Watershed - Shioc River (WR13)
Shioc River Watershed

Details

The Shioc River is a tributary to the Wolf River, having its headwaters in Shawano County and flowing south and west to meet the Wolf River in Outagamie County, north of the City of Shiocton. This watershed holds the East, West and Mainstem Shioc River and is approximately 53 miles in its entirety. The West Branch of the Shioc River begins in a cedar swamp just north of the Village of Bonduel. Groundwater input in the Village supports a Class 1 Brook Trout fishery- the only known brook trout fishery in the eastern part of the Wolf River Basin. Habitat enhancement (1998) and removal of the sewage treatment plant discharge (2000) should allow for expansion of the population and expansion of suitable water for brook trout.

Date  2001

Ecological Landscapes for Shioc River Watershed

Ecological Landscapes

The Shioc River Watershed spans two ecological landscapes: the Central Lake Michigan Coast Ecological Landscape along its western third and the Northern Lake Michigan Coastal Ecological Landscape in the eastern two-thirds of the watershed. The Central Lake Michigan Coastal Ecological Landscape stretches from southern Door County west across Green Bay to the Wolf River drainage, then southward in a narrowing strip along the Lake Michigan shore to central Milwaukee County. Owing to the influence of Lake Michigan in the eastern part of this landscape, summers there are cooler, winters warmer, and precipitation levels greater than at locations farther inland. Dolomites and shales underlie the glacial deposits that blanket virtually all of the Central Lake Michigan Coastal Ecological Landscape. The dolomite Niagara Escarpment is the major bedrock feature, running across the entire landscape from northeast to southwest. Series of dolomite cliffs provide critical habitat for rare terrestrial snails, bats, and specialized plants. The primary glacial landforms are ground moraine, outwash, and lakeplain. The topography is generally rolling where the surface is underlain by ground moraine, variable over areas of outwash, and nearly level where lacustrine deposits are present. Important soils include clays, loams, sands, and gravels. Certain landforms, such as sand spits, clay bluffs, beach and dune complexes, and ridge and swale systems, are associated only with the shorelines of Lake Michigan and Green Bay. Historically, most of this landscape was vegetated with mesic hardwood forest composed primarily of sugar maple, basswood, and beech. Hemlock and white pine were locally important, but hemlock was generally restricted to cool moist sites near Lake Michigan. Areas of poorly drained glacial lakeplain supported wet forests of tamarack, white cedar, black ash, red maple, and elm, while the Wolf and Embarrass Rivers flowed through extensive floodplain forests of silver maple, green ash, and swamp white oak. Emergent marshes and wet meadows were common in and adjacent to lower Green Bay, while Lake Michigan shoreline areas featured beaches, dunes, interdunal wetlands, marshes, and highly diverse ridge and swale vegetation. Small patches of prairie and oak savanna were present in the southwestern portion of this landscape. The Northern Lake Michigan Coastal Ecological Landscape is located in northeastern Wisconsin, and includes Green Bay and the northern part of the Door Peninsula. Its landforms consist of the Niagara escarpment, a prominent dolomite outcropping along the east side of Green Bay, a lacustrine plain along the west side of Green Bay, and ground moraine elsewhere. Low sand dunes and beach ridges that support Great Lakes endemics and many other rare species are found along the Great Lakes shoreline. The influence of Lake Michigan moderates extreme temperatures. Soils are very diverse; in some areas, lacustrine sands are found overlying clays or bedrock within only a few feet of the surface. In the Door Peninsula, soils are typically stony loamy sands to loams. Poorly drained sands are common in the lake plain or in depressions between dunes and beach ridges. On the western side of Green Bay, the ground moraine is composed mostly of moderately well drained, rocky sandy loams, interspersed with lacustrine sands and clays, and peat and muck also common. Historic vegetation included maple-basswood-beech forest, hemlock-hardwood forest, northern white cedar swamp, hardwood-conifer swamp, wet meadows, and coastal marshes. Conifer dominated upland forests that resemble the boreal forest were present along Lake Michigan; they contain a significant component of white spruce and balsam fir. Cliffs, sinkholes, and dolomite ledges are associated with the Niagara Escarpment. Current vegetation consists of more than 60% non-forested land, most of which is in agricultural crops, with smaller amounts of grassland, wetland, shrubland, and urbanized areas. Forested lands are dominated by maple-basswood, with smaller amounts of lowland hardwoods, aspen-birch, and lowland conifers. High quality areas of exposed alkaline bedrock beach occur on the northern Door Peninsula, providing habitat for many rare plants. Several islands lie off the Door Peninsula and these also provide critical habitat for rare species and colonially nesting birds.

Date  2010

Watershed Grants
Grant Details
Lake Protection Grant
Date
4/15/2015
Waters Involved
Grass Lake
Status
Complete

Town Of Belle Plaine: Hlk-Clover Leaf Healthy Lakes: The Town of Belle Plaine will implement best practices described in Wisconsin\2019s 2014-2017 Healthy Lakes Implementation Plan on the Cloverleaf Lakes. Practices include: fish sticks, 350 ft2 native plantings, and rain gardens on at least 12 properties, including the Gibson Island and Round Lake Park demonstration sites.
The best practices require a contract to remain in effect for 10 years and must include minimum operation and maintenance requirements and data collection as described in grant condition #16. If best practice(s) are implemented on land owned by the grant Sponsor, this Lake Protection Grant Agreement serves as the contract. If best practice(s) are implemented on land other than the sponsor\2019s, a contract between the sponsor and landowner that abides by grant condition #16 is required.
The Department may require re-payment of project installation costs if the best practice is disturbed or removed. The Sponsor and/or the Department may perform site inspections and/or monitoring to ensure project success.
Deliverables: Best practice location and design information, if not included in the application; signed 10-year landowner contract; pre and post project installation photographs; summary of education activities and publicity/promotion of Healthy Lakes initiative, if applicable.
Special conditions: The state share of each best practice cannot exceed $1,000. The state share of grant administration and technical assistance costs may not exceed 10% of the grant award; technical assistance does not include implementation labor. Funding cannot be used for mitigation or regulatory compliance activities. Water regulation and/or county zoning permits must be issued before construction. The Healthy Lakes logo should be used for promotion and publicity, and DNR recognized as a funding source.


Grant Details
Lake Protection Grant
Date
2/27/1996
Waters Involved
Loon Lake
Status
Complete

Loon Lake Management District: Acq-Loon Lake Land Acquisition - Bertrand Property: The Loon Lake Wescott Management District will acquire 89.25 acres of primarily lowland with approximately 1/2 mile of frontage on Loon Lake. The district will maintain the land in a wild and natural condition to protect the water quality of Loon Lake. Eligible costs include acuqisition of the parcel, appraisal, and recording fees.


Grant Details
Lake Protection Grant
Date
9/1/1998
Waters Involved
Loon Lake
Status
Complete

Loon Lake Management District: Acq-Loon Lake Land Acquisition: The Loon Lake Wescott Management District proposes to purchase 32.1 acres of vacantland with approximately 1/4 mile of frontage on Loon Lake. The Management District will keep it in its naturally landscaped state for conservancy purposes.


Grant Details
Lake Protection Grant
Date
4/15/2015
Waters Involved
Pine Lake
Status
Complete

Town Of Belle Plaine: Hlk-Clover Leaf Healthy Lakes: The Town of Belle Plaine will implement best practices described in Wisconsin\2019s 2014-2017 Healthy Lakes Implementation Plan on the Cloverleaf Lakes. Practices include: fish sticks, 350 ft2 native plantings, and rain gardens on at least 12 properties, including the Gibson Island and Round Lake Park demonstration sites.
The best practices require a contract to remain in effect for 10 years and must include minimum operation and maintenance requirements and data collection as described in grant condition #16. If best practice(s) are implemented on land owned by the grant Sponsor, this Lake Protection Grant Agreement serves as the contract. If best practice(s) are implemented on land other than the sponsor\2019s, a contract between the sponsor and landowner that abides by grant condition #16 is required.
The Department may require re-payment of project installation costs if the best practice is disturbed or removed. The Sponsor and/or the Department may perform site inspections and/or monitoring to ensure project success.
Deliverables: Best practice location and design information, if not included in the application; signed 10-year landowner contract; pre and post project installation photographs; summary of education activities and publicity/promotion of Healthy Lakes initiative, if applicable.
Special conditions: The state share of each best practice cannot exceed $1,000. The state share of grant administration and technical assistance costs may not exceed 10% of the grant award; technical assistance does not include implementation labor. Funding cannot be used for mitigation or regulatory compliance activities. Water regulation and/or county zoning permits must be issued before construction. The Healthy Lakes logo should be used for promotion and publicity, and DNR recognized as a funding source.


Grant Details
Lake Protection Grant
Date
9/1/2004
Waters Involved
Round Lake
Status
Complete

Town Of Belle Plaine: Acq-Town Of Belle Plaine Land Acquisition (Stieg): The Town of Belle Plaine proposes to purchase 10 acres of land known as the Stieg parcel.


Grant Details
Lake Protection Grant
Date
4/15/2015
Waters Involved
Round Lake
Status
Complete

Town Of Belle Plaine: Hlk-Clover Leaf Healthy Lakes: The Town of Belle Plaine will implement best practices described in Wisconsin\2019s 2014-2017 Healthy Lakes Implementation Plan on the Cloverleaf Lakes. Practices include: fish sticks, 350 ft2 native plantings, and rain gardens on at least 12 properties, including the Gibson Island and Round Lake Park demonstration sites.
The best practices require a contract to remain in effect for 10 years and must include minimum operation and maintenance requirements and data collection as described in grant condition #16. If best practice(s) are implemented on land owned by the grant Sponsor, this Lake Protection Grant Agreement serves as the contract. If best practice(s) are implemented on land other than the sponsor\2019s, a contract between the sponsor and landowner that abides by grant condition #16 is required.
The Department may require re-payment of project installation costs if the best practice is disturbed or removed. The Sponsor and/or the Department may perform site inspections and/or monitoring to ensure project success.
Deliverables: Best practice location and design information, if not included in the application; signed 10-year landowner contract; pre and post project installation photographs; summary of education activities and publicity/promotion of Healthy Lakes initiative, if applicable.
Special conditions: The state share of each best practice cannot exceed $1,000. The state share of grant administration and technical assistance costs may not exceed 10% of the grant award; technical assistance does not include implementation labor. Funding cannot be used for mitigation or regulatory compliance activities. Water regulation and/or county zoning permits must be issued before construction. The Healthy Lakes logo should be used for promotion and publicity, and DNR recognized as a funding source.


Grant Details
Lake Protection Grant
Date
7/1/2005
Waters Involved
Shawano Lake
Status
Complete

Shawano County: Lmi-Shawano Lake Diagnostic Feasibility Study: Shawano County proposes to conduct a diagnostic and feasibility study to better understand the ecosystem of Shawano Lake and its watershed, to educate and inform the public about this ecosystem, to establish a management partnership to identify appropriate management options, and to implement a management strategy. The objectives of the study include: determine the current water quality in Shawano Lake, understand how/where watershed land uses impact water quality, identify the importance of internal sources of phosphorus, assess the influence of aquatic plants on lake water quality, foster a cooperative and active community focused on Shawano Lake and its watershed, develop community and agency agreement on effective management options, and implement the management strategy. The project elements and deliverables will be completed as described in the project proposal submitted to the Department and dated April 28, 2005.


Grant Details
Lake Protection Grant
Date
9/1/2001
Waters Involved
Wilson Lake
Status
Complete

Shawano County: Acq-Kluck Land Acquisition On Wilson Lake: Shawano County proposes to purchase 71 acres of land known as the Kluck parcel on Wilson Lake for conservancy purposes.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
5/5/1995
Waters Involved
White Lake
Status
Complete

Town Of Lessor: White Lake Watershed Land Use Inventory & Analysis: Complete a land use plan and map for the White Lake Watershed. Prepare an inventory of land resources in the watershed. Evaluate how development may affect the quality of the lake environment.Complete an implementation plan for the towns, addressing zoning and subdivision ordinances, acquisitions, and other strategies. Disseminate information to the public by newsletter mailings, public meetings, summary report mailings, and local newspaperarticles.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
10/1/1996
Waters Involved
Wolf River
Status
Complete

Wolf River Preservation Association: Wolf River Watershed Management Planning - Phase 2: The Wolf River Preservation Association proposes to continue watershed management planning activities. Phase 2 project activities include continuing water quality monitoring, conducting a recreational use survey, continuing to assess erosional areas, continuing to identify exotic species, and preparation of a report summarizing the data collected and analyses performed. The sponsor will provide the Department of Natural Resources with both a paper copy and an electronic copy of the report. Information about the results of phase 2 activities will be disseminated to the public by newsletter, fact sheet, public meeting, and local newspaper article.


Grant Details
Targeted Runoff - Rural Construction
Date
1/1/2015
Waters Involved
Unnamed
Status
Complete

Outagamie County: Wagenson Farms: This grant provides funding and authorizes cost-share reimbursement by the department for the above named project as described in the grant application submitted for calendar year 2015 for the eligible best management practices listed below to address nonpoint sources of pollution. The cost-share reimbursement rate will be up to 70 % of the actual eligible installation costs, to the maximum amount contained in Part 2. Cost-share agreements (CSAs), with the appropriate operation and maintenance requirements, must be signed with any landowner involved if work is to be performed on privately owned land.


Grant Details
Urban Nonpoint - Stormwater Planning
Date
1/1/2004
Waters Involved
West Branch Shioc River
Status
Complete

Village Of Bonduel: Stormwater Management Plan: to cost-share @ 70% development of stormwater management plan


Monitoring & Projects

Projects including grants, restoration work and studies shown below have occurred in this watershed. Click the links below to read through the text. While these are not an exhaustive list of activities, they provide insight into the management activities happening in this watershed.

Grants and Management Projects
Shioc River Watershed
Watershed Recommendations
Best Management Practices, Implement
Apple Creek Watershed Large-scale TRM
Date
Status
This project promotes nonpoint source best management practices to contribute to the restoration of the Apple Creek Watershed and was funded by the 319 grant.
1/1/2018
In Progress
Projects
 
Best Management Practices, Implement
Outagamie County Nonpoint Source Pollution Reduction BMPs
Date
Status
This project is a landowner installation of nonpoint source best management practices to contribute to the restoration of Wisconsin's waters and was funded by the 319 grant. Specifically, the grantee will implement: a manure storage system; heavy use area protection; roof runoff systems; subsurface drains; and wastewater treatment strips.
1/1/2018
In Progress
Projects
 
Best Management Practices, Implement
Shawano County Nonpoint Source BMPs
Date
Status
This project is an installation of nonpoint source best management practices to contribute to the restoration of Wisconsin?s waters and was funded by the 319 grant.
11/10/2017
In Progress
Projects
Documents
 
Best Management Practices, Implement
Outagamie County - Upper Duck Creek TMDL Implementation
Date
Status
This project is an installation of nonpoint source best management practices to contribute to the restoration of Wisconsin?s waters and was funded by the 319 grant. Specifically, the grantee will implement: critical area stabilization, filter strips, grade stabilization, cover and green manure cropping, residue management, riparian buffers, waterway systems, and water and sediment control systems to remedy discharges of manure, sediment and phosphorus in runoff entering waters of the state and address the following NR 151 Agricultural Performance Standards and Prohibitions:sheet, rill, and wind erosion; tillage setback; and phosphorus index.
1/1/2017
In Progress
Projects
 
Best Management Practices, Implement
Outagamie County Farm BMPs
Date
Status
This project is a landowner installation of nonpoint source best management practices to contribute to the restoration of Wisconsin's waters and was funded by the 319 grant. Specifically, the grantee will implement: a manure storage system and a waste transfer system to remedy discharges of manure, sediment and phosphorus in runoff.
1/1/2017
In Progress
Projects
 
Best Management Practices, Implement
Outagamie County Nonpoint Source Pollution Reduction BMPs
Date
Status
Outagamie County Nonpoint Source Pollution Reduction BMPs
1/1/2017
In Progress
Projects
Documents
 
Best Management Practices, Implement
Outagamie County Nonpoint Source Pollution Reduction BMPs
Date
Status
This project is a landowner installation of nonpoint source best management practices to contribute to the restoration of Wisconsin's waters and was funded by the 319 grant. Specifically, the grantee will implement: a manure storage system, a waste transfer system, and a milking center waste control system to remedy discharges of manure, sediment and phosphorus in runoff.
1/1/2017
In Progress
Projects
 
Best Management Practices, Implement
Outagamie County Notice of Discharge
Date
Status
This project is a landowner installation of nonpoint source best management practices to contribute to the restoration of Wisconsin's waters and was funded by the 319 grant. Specifically, the grantee will provide 70% cost-sharing to the grantee to assist landowner(s) / operator(s) in addressing the sources of direct runoff to an unnamed tributary of the Black River, as cited in the Notice of Discharge.
5/23/2016
In Progress
Projects
 
Best Management Practices, Implement
Outagamie County Beef Farm BMPs
Date
Status
This project is a landowner installation of nonpoint source best management practices to contribute to the restoration of Wisconsin's waters and was funded by the 319 grant. Specifically, the grantee will implement: a manure storage system, a barnyard runoff control system, roof runoff systems, underground outlets, a waste transfer system, and wastewater treatment strips.
1/1/2016
In Progress
Projects
Documents
 
Best Management Practices, Implement
Greenville - Rain Garden Retrofits
Date
Status
This project is an installation of nonpoint source best management practices to contribute to the restoration of Wisconsin?s waters and was funded by the 319 grant. Specifically, the grantee will implement: rain garden retrofits.
1/1/2015
In Progress
Projects
Documents
 
Best Management Practices, Implement
Outagamie County - Plum & Kankapot Creeks
Date
Status
This project is an installation of nonpoint source best management practices to contribute to the restoration of Wisconsin's waters and was funded by the 319 grant.
1/1/2015
In Progress
Projects
Documents
 
Control Streambank Erosion
Garners Creek - Buchanan Road Stream Restoration
Date
Status
Garners Creek - Buchanan Road Stream Restoration
1/1/2017
In Progress
Projects
Documents
 
Monitor Aquatic Biology
Monitor biology on WBIC: 317200
Date
Status
Conduct biological (mIBI or fIBI) monitoring on Unnamed, WBIC: 317200, AU:5735836
5/21/2016
Proposed
Projects
 
Monitor Aquatic Biology
Monitor biology on WBIC: 317100
Date
Status
Conduct biological (mIBI or fIBI) monitoring on Black Creek, WBIC: 317100, AU:337848
5/21/2016
Proposed
Projects
 
Stormwater Planning, Implementation
Harrison - Stormwater Planning
Date
Status
This project promotes nonpoint source best management practices to contribute to the restoration of Wisconsin?s waters and was funded by the 319 grant. Storm water planning activities will be undertaken by the municipality and will result in the following products: other new ordinances that affect runoff from the developed urban area; development and implementation of a new financing mechanism for funding the storm water program; updated storm water management plan for the entire developed urban area; and a new storm water management plan for new development.
1/1/2018
In Progress
Projects
 
Shioc River WatershedWatershed History Note

The City of Seymour in the Shioc River Watershed was founded in 1868 and named after Governor Horatio Seymour of the state of New York. Seymour is said to have once been called Squeedunk, which means "little settlement" or "village". William and John Ausbourne were the first settlers in Seymour. They had traveled from western Outagamie County on the Wolf River during the summer of 1857 and made their way to the mouth of the Shioc River. They then moved to a spot where the Black Creek flows into the Shioc. After finding that there were no longer any roads to follow, the Ausbournes finally settled in the present location of Seymour, which was occupied by Native Americans at the time. There they built a log house, the only residence in Seymour for two years. Over the years more settlers came to Seymour. As the population of the area grew, more villages were established in the Seymour area. On March 1, 1877 Seymour became a recognized town, along with the towns of Osborn and Freedom. During the early 1880s, construction of the Green Bay and Lake Pepin Railroad was completed. In 1883 a station was built in Seymour, and soon Seymour was recognized as the smallest incorporated city in the nation. The Seymour resident, Charlie Nagreen, at the age of 15, served the world's first hamburger at the Seymour Fair of 1885. He did this by flattening a meatball and placing it between two pieces of bread, to increase its portability. He became known as Hamburger Charlie and later sold hamburgers at the Brown and Outagamie county fairs. In 2007, the Wisconsin State Legislature declared Seymour, Wisconsin, the original Home of the Hamburger.

Date  2011