EPA National Lakes Survey 2012

Purpose

During the summer of 2012, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), states, tribes and other partners will conduct the second nationwide survey of the condition of the nation’s lakes. The National Lakes Assessment (NLA) will help citizens and governments measure the health of our waters, take actions to prevent pollution, and evaluate the effectiveness of protection and restoration efforts. The NLA 2012 is one in a series of national surveys of the condition of the nation’s waters (see www.epa.gov/aquaticsurveys). Designed to estimate the percentage of lakes that are in good, fair, or poor condition, the survey will serve as a scientific report card on America’s lakes. It will examine ecological, water quality, and recreational indicators, and assess how widespread key stressors (such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and acidification) are across the country. The survey is a collaborative effort that involves dozens of state environmental and natural resource agencies, federal agencies, universities and other organizations. In most states, state water quality staff will conduct the water quality sampling and habitat assessments.

Objective

The 2012 National Lakes Assessment has just completed its field sampling season. In the spring, EPA and its partners held 9 field training sessions and trained 89 sampling crews. This sampling season will lead to the second national report on the condition of the nation's lakes, ponds, and reservoirs. Next steps in the process include: lab sample processing, data cleanup, and data analysis.

Outcome

EPA and its state and tribal partners conducted a survey of the nation's lakes, ponds and reservoirs in 2007 and began a second survey in 2012. This National Lakes Assessment is designed to provide statistically valid regional and national estimates of the condition of lakes. It uses a probability-based sampling design to represent the condition of all lakes in similar regions sharing similar ecological characteristics. Consistent sampling and analytical procedures ensure that the results can be compared across the country. The National Lakes Assessment helps build state and tribal capacity for monitoring and assessment and promotes collaboration across jurisdictional boundaries in the assessment of water quality.

Study Design

NLA 2012 •Number of Sample Sites: 904 •Revisit Sites: 96 Types of Sites: The following map displays the base, oversample, and state supplemental sites that may be sampled during the 2012 NLA Field Season. •Base - The original 904 sites selected to be surveyed •Oversample - Sites that will substitute for the base sites if determined unsuitable for the survey (not in design, not reachable, not sampleable) •State Supplemental - some states had the ability to add on additional sample sites for state-scale surveys, these are the additional sites.

Related Reports

Run Project Summary Report
View Umbrella-Projects
View Related-Projects

Baseline Monitoring
Data Gathering
EPA_LAKES_12-13
2012
Complete
 
Reports and Documents
 
Activities & Recommendations
Monitor Water Quality or Sediment
Lakes assessment Silver Lake 67400
Monitor Water Quality or Sediment
During the summer of 2012, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), states, tribes and other partners will conduct the second nationwide survey of the condition of the nation’s lakes. The National Lakes Assessment (NLA) will help citizens and governments measure the health of our waters, take actions to prevent pollution, and evaluate the effectiveness of protection and restoration efforts. The NLA 2012 is one in a series of national surveys of the condition of the nation’s waters (see www.epa.gov/aquaticsurveys). Designed to estimate the percentage of lakes that are in good, fair, or poor condition, the survey will serve as a scientific report card on America’s lakes. It will examine ecological, water quality, and recreational indicators, and assess how widespread key stressors (such as nitrogen, phosphorus, and acidification) are across the country. The survey is a collaborative effort that involves dozens of state environmental and natural resource agencies, federal agencies, universities and other organizations. In most states, state water quality staff will conduct the water quality sampling and habitat assessments.
 
Watershed
 
Waters