Waubesa Wetland Study (2017)

Purpose

DNR committed to collaborate with other interested and affected parties to conduct a comprehensive study of the watershed upstream of the Waubesa Wetlands within 3 years. The DNR has asked the Capital Area Regional Planning Commission to begin this process, as part of our water quality planning contract with the DNR, by organizing a steering committee to develop a detailed plan and budget for this study.

Objective

An effort that involves evaluating groundwater flow and surface and groundwater interactions between streams, springs, groundwater, and Lake Waubesa, using the 2014 Dane County Regional Groundwater Model update developed by WGNHS,including the development of a new inset model for the Waubesa Wetlands, if warranted. This project recommends utilizing updated rainfall data from NOAA Atlas 14 and include considerations for changing climatic conditions. 1. Evaluate nutrient loadings, including nitrogen and phosphorus in both particulate and dissolved forms, in streams, springs, groundwater, and Lake Waubesa. 2. Document the assessment of the health of the watershed’s biological communities (plants, wildlife, fish, invertebrates, etc.), and how changes in surface and ground water quantity, quality, and flow may affect those biological communities. 3. Document evaluation of current and potential future municipal water supply well placement. 4. Provide recommendations for source water protection of areas that feed the perched fen located in the southwest portion of Lake Waubesa. 5. Provide recommendations for management actions to mitigate the cone of depression resulting from current and future municipal water well pumping.

Study Design

Lake Waubesa: 803700

Related Reports

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Water Quality Planning
Water Quality Management Plans
WaubesaWetlandsStudy
2016
Final Report Needed
 
Reports and Documents
Waubesa Wetlands Initial team formation and study design
What’s New in Adaptive Management and Restoration of Coasts and Estuaries? Joy B. Zedler Estuaries and Coasts DOI 10.1007/s12237-016-0162-5
Seasonal shifts in the relative importance of local versus upstream sources of phosphorus to individual lakes in a chain Cory P. McDonald and Richard C. Lathrop
Draft Framework for Wetland Resources
National Academy of Sciences.The rapid conversion of land to urban and suburban areas has profoundly altered how water flows during and following storm events, putting higher volumes of water and more pollutants into the nation's rivers, lakes, and estuaries. These changes have degraded water quality and habitat in virtually every urban stream system. The Clean Water Act regulatory framework for addressing sewage and industrial wastes is not well suited to the more difficult problem of stormwater discharges. This book calls for an entirely new permitting structure that would put authority and accountability for stormwater discharges at the municipal level. A number of additional actions, such as conserving natural areas, reducing hard surface cover (e.g., roads and parking lots), and retrofitting urban areas with features that hold and treat stormwater, are recommended.
Water Quality, Hydrology, and Response to Changes in Phosphorous Loading of Nagawicka Lake, a Calcareous Lake in Waukesha County, Wisconsin
Hydrology and history: land use changes and ecological responses in an urban wetland C.R. Owen Wetlands Ecology and Management 6: 209–219, 1999.
 
Activities & Recommendations
Urban Growth Planning
Document evaluation of current and potential future municipal water supply well placement.
Protect Headwaters and Springs
Provide recommendations for management actions to mitigate the cone of depression resulting from current and future municipal water well pumping.
Protect Headwaters and Springs
Provide recommendations for source water protection of areas that feed the perched fen located in the southwest portion of Lake Waubesa.
Watershed Mapping or Assessment
Document the assessment of the health of the watershed’s biological communities (plants, wildlife, fish, invertebrates, etc.), and how changes in surface and ground water quantity, quality, and flow may affect those biological communities.
Watershed Mapping or Assessment
Waubesa Wetlands Study with other interested and affected parties to conduct a comprehensive study of the watershed upstream of the Waubesa Wetlands within 3 years.
Monitor Wetlands
Evaluate nutrient loadings, including nitrogen and phosphorus in both particulate and dissolved forms, in streams, springs, groundwater, and Lake Waubesa.
 
Watershed
 
Waters