Lake Ripley PWS Plan - Nine Key Element Plan

Purpose

The Lake Ripley Priority Lake Project plan assesses the nonpoint sources of pollution in the Lake Ripley Watershed and guides the implementation of nonpoint source control measures. These control measures are needed to meet specific water resource objectives for Lake Ripley and its tributary. The primary objective of the project is to reduce nonpoint source pollution to the lake. A watershed management plan was prepared by the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (DNR), the Department of Agriculture, Trade, and Consumer Protection (DATCP), the Lake Ripley Management District, and the Jefferson County Land Conservation Department. The DNR selected the Lake Ripley Priority Lake Project through the Wisconsin Nonpoint Source Water Pollution Abatement Program in 1992. It joined approximately 67 similar watershed projects statewide in which nonpoint source control measures are being planned and implemented. The Nonpoint Source Water Pollution Abatement Program was created in 1978 by the Wisconsin State Legislature. The program provides financial and technical assistance to landowners and local governments to reduce nonpoint source pollution.

Objective

Lake Ripley is the major surface water feature in the watershed. It is a 418-acre marl lake with a maximum depth of 44 feet (13.2 meters). It is a drainage lake with one inlet on the southeast corner of the lake and one outlet on the northwest corner. Since it is less than a two hour drive from Madison, Milwaukee and Chicago, the lake is an important recreational resource to the area, and is heavily used by boaters, swimmers, and anglers. The water quality of Lake Ripley has deteriorated since humans settled in the area in the mid-1800s. Clearing land for agriculture increased the loading of sediment and nutrients to the lake, resulting in an increase in algae and a decrease in water clarity. This decline continued until the 1960s when erosion rates slowed and the water quality began to improve. However, the erosion rate increased again in the 1970s, most likely from increased residential development. Even though agricultural activity in the watershed historically contributed most of the sediment and nutrients to the lake, it appears that development is contributing a significant share of phosphorus. Water quality records indicate that the present water quality of the !alee is worse now than at any other time in the last 250 years. The Trophic State Index of the lake, a measure of the biological condition of the lake, hovers around 50, which is borderline mesotrophic/eutrophic. This means the !alee suffers from excessive nutrients. Nuisance algae blooms and excessive weed growth, particularly Eurasian mi1foil, are common occurrences in Lake Ripley.

Outcome

The goals of the Lake Ripley Priority Lake Project are based on achieving realistic biological and recreational uses in the lake and its tributary stream. Pollutant load reductions are developed according to activities needed to achieve the water quality objectives. The following is a summary of reductions to be targeted for the entire watershed.

Study Design

http://dnr.wi.gov/topic/nonpoint/documents/9kep/expired/Lake_Ripley-Plan.pdf

Related Reports

Run Project Summary Report
View Umbrella-Projects
View Related-Projects

Watershed Planning
Priority Watershed Plan
NKE13
1995
Active
 
Reports and Documents
Shoreline rehabilitation on Lake Ripley, Jefferson Co.
Lake Ripley PWS Plan - Nine Key Element Plan Plan Approved February, 1995 Publication Revised October, 1998
 
Activities & Recommendations
Nine Key Element Plan
Lake Ripley PWS Plan - Nine Key Element Plan - The Lake Ripley Priority Lake Project plan assesses the nonpoint sources of pollution in the Lake Ripley Watershed and guides the implementation of nonpoint source control measures. These control measures are needed to meet specific water resource objectives for Lake Ripley and its tributary. The primary objective of the project is to reduce nonpoint source pollution to the lake.
ATTAINS Alternative Restoration Approach
Lake Ripley PWS Plan - Nine Key Element Plan - The Lake Ripley Priority Lake Project plan assesses the nonpoint sources of pollution in the Lake Ripley Watershed and guides the implementation of nonpoint source control measures. These control measures are needed to meet specific water resource objectives for Lake Ripley and its tributary. The primary objective of the project is to reduce nonpoint source pollution to the lake.
 
Watershed
 
Waters