CLEAN LAKES ALLIANCE: Near Shore Water Quality Monitoring

Purpose

Clean Lakes Alliance will run a program to increase near-shore water quality monitoring in the Madison Lakes in 2015 to help with beach closure timeliness, and improve ability of the public to make decisions about swimming. They will recruit, train and equip lifeguards or volunteers monitor a minimum of 6 and up to a maximum of 16 public beaches, with a focus on once per week E. coli sampling. In addition, up to 44 citizen volunteers will do weekly end-of-pier assessments of turbidity, temperature and blue green algae presence. Samples will be collected and delivered to the city-county health lab. Data will be analyzed and shared with researchers at UW Madison who are interested in modeling algae blooms within near-shore areas, and made available to the public on a mobile-ready website. Also, a community presentation will be given at the end of the season to discuss findings and recommendations, and a final report, including raw data, will be submitted to the department.

Related Reports

Run Project Summary Report
View Umbrella-Projects
View Related-Projects

Lakes Grant
Small Scale Lake Planning
SPL-352-15
2015
Complete
 
Reports and Documents
Spreadsheet of CLA beach samples collected in 2015. Spreadsheet lists sample number, site, collection date and time, and E. coli results and units.
Yahara Lakes 101 Presentation on what the Clean Lakes Alliance does, how to use MIOsoft, and updates for 2015.
Website that allows for viewing of the citizen lake monitoring data from sites around Lakes Mendota, Monona, Kegonsa, Waubesa, and Wingra. It is updated as soon as citizen monitoring data is uploaded to the website by monitors who sample at beaches and piers around the lakes.
The goal of the Clean Lakes Alliance’s (CLA) citizen monitoring program is to use citizen science to investigate the near-shore environment, use this information to improve lake user satisfaction and safety, and also generate interest and engagement with the lakes. Though several agencies conduct regular water sampling on the Madison-area lakes, most monitoring occurs far from shore, away from the beaches and access points where citizens interact with the lakes.
List of sites and locations to go along with sites map (separate document)
Results of weekly E. coli sampling throughout the Yahara Chain
Map of sites where measurements were taken. Information on site locations can be found in Site Locations [Yahara Chain]
Spreadsheet recording algal blooms and water information (temperature, turbidity, etc.)
 
Activities & Recommendations
Grant Awarded
Clean Lakes Alliance will run a program to increase near-shore water quality monitoring in the Madison Lakes in 2015 to help with beach closure timeliness, and improve ability of the public to make decisions about swimming. They will recruit, train and equip lifeguards or volunteers monitor a minimum of 6 and up to a maximum of 16 public beaches, with a focus on once per week E. coli sampling. In addition, up to 44 citizen volunteers will do weekly end-of-pier assessments of turbidity, temperature and blue green algae presence. Samples will be collected and delivered to the city-county health lab. Data will be analyzed and shared with researchers at UW Madison who are interested in modeling algae blooms within near-shore areas, and made available to the public on a mobile-ready website. Also, a community presentation will be given at the end of the season to discuss findings and recommendations, and a final report, including raw data, will be submitted to the department.
Grant Awarded
Clean Lakes Alliance will run a program to increase near-shore water quality monitoring in the Madison Lakes in 2015 to help with beach closure timeliness, and improve ability of the public to make decisions about swimming. They will recruit, train and equip lifeguards or volunteers monitor a minimum of 6 and up to a maximum of 16 public beaches, with a focus on once per week E. coli sampling. In addition, up to 44 citizen volunteers will do weekly end-of-pier assessments of turbidity, temperature and blue green algae presence. Samples will be collected and delivered to the city-county health lab. Data will be analyzed and shared with researchers at UW Madison who are interested in modeling algae blooms within near-shore areas, and made available to the public on a mobile-ready website. Also, a community presentation will be given at the end of the season to discuss findings and recommendations, and a final report, including raw data, will be submitted to the department.
Grant Awarded
Clean Lakes Alliance will run a program to increase near-shore water quality monitoring in the Madison Lakes in 2015 to help with beach closure timeliness, and improve ability of the public to make decisions about swimming. They will recruit, train and equip lifeguards or volunteers monitor a minimum of 6 and up to a maximum of 16 public beaches, with a focus on once per week E. coli sampling. In addition, up to 44 citizen volunteers will do weekly end-of-pier assessments of turbidity, temperature and blue green algae presence. Samples will be collected and delivered to the city-county health lab. Data will be analyzed and shared with researchers at UW Madison who are interested in modeling algae blooms within near-shore areas, and made available to the public on a mobile-ready website. Also, a community presentation will be given at the end of the season to discuss findings and recommendations, and a final report, including raw data, will be submitted to the department.
Grant Awarded
Clean Lakes Alliance will run a program to increase near-shore water quality monitoring in the Madison Lakes in 2015 to help with beach closure timeliness, and improve ability of the public to make decisions about swimming. They will recruit, train and equip lifeguards or volunteers monitor a minimum of 6 and up to a maximum of 16 public beaches, with a focus on once per week E. coli sampling. In addition, up to 44 citizen volunteers will do weekly end-of-pier assessments of turbidity, temperature and blue green algae presence. Samples will be collected and delivered to the city-county health lab. Data will be analyzed and shared with researchers at UW Madison who are interested in modeling algae blooms within near-shore areas, and made available to the public on a mobile-ready website. Also, a community presentation will be given at the end of the season to discuss findings and recommendations, and a final report, including raw data, will be submitted to the department.
 
Watershed
 
Waters