ADAMS COUNTY: RES-Camelot Lake Restoration

Purpose

Adams Co. proposes to establish four shoreline protection/restoration sites for demonstration purposes on Camelot Lake, and to cost share on similar practices on 27 privately owned parcels. Major project elements include: 1) riprap and anchored log shoreline stabalization, 2) establishment and maintenance of 35' vegetated buffer strips, 3) stormwater management planning and implementation for structures.

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Lakes Grant
Lake Protection Grant
LPT-285-06
2005
Complete
 
Reports and Documents
Camelot LMP for Adams County.
An updated aquatic macrophytes (plants) field study of Lower Camelot Lake was conducted during July 2013 by staff from the Adams County Land and Water Conservatism Department and the Tri-Lakes Management District. Prior quantitative vegetation studies using the transect method were performed by Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources staff in 2000 and staff of Adams County Land & Water Conservation Department in 2006. Two methods were used in 2009: the transect method (t) and the point intercept method (pi). The 2013 survey used the PI method.
The Camelot Lakes are located in the Town of Rome, Adams County, WI (T20N, R6E), in the south central part of Wisconsin. They are part of a series of lakes commonly called “Tri-Lakes”. Lower Camelot Lake is the first lake in the series, where Fourteen Mile Creek enters. Lower Camelot Lake is 260 surface acres, with a maximum depth is 24 feet and an average depth of 8 feet. Spring Branch Creek enters Upper Camelot Lake. Upper Camelot Lake has 191 surface acres, with a maximum depth of about 25 feet and an average depth of 8 feet. A channel connects Lower Camelot Lake to Upper Camelot Lake. There is a public boat ramp located on southwest side of Lower Camelot Lake owned by The Adams County Parks Department. The dams that impound these streams & form the lakes are owned and maintained by Adams County. The lake shores on both lakes are heavily developed. The primary soil type in the both the ground and surface watersheds is sand. However, directly around the two Camelot Lakes, the soil is mostly sand. Sandy soil tends to be excessively drained, no matter what the slope. Water, air and nutrients move through sandy soils at a rapid rate, so that little runoff occurs unless the soil becomes saturated. Although water erosion can be a problem, wind erosion may be more of a hazard with sandy soils, especially since these soils dry out so quickly. There are also draught hazards with sandy soils. Getting vegetation started in sandy soils is often difficult due to the low available water capacity, as well as low natural fertility and organic material. Onsite waste disposal in sandy soils is also a problem because of slope and seepage; mound systems are usually required. Loamy sands tend to be well-drained, with water, air and nutrients moving through them at a rapid rate. Runoff, when it occurs, tends to be slow. Loamy sands have little water-holding capacity and low natural fertility, although they usually have more organic matter present than do sandy soils. Both wind and water erosion are potential hazards with loamy sands, as is drought. There are difficulties with waste disposal and vegetation establishment because of slope and seepage.
 
Activities & Recommendations
Grant Awarded
Adams Co. proposes to establish four shoreline protection/restoration sites for demonstration purposes on Camelot Lake, and to cost share on similar practices on 27 privately owned parcels. Major project elements include: 1) riprap and anchored log shoreline stabalization, 2) establishment and maintenance of 35' vegetated buffer strips, 3) stormwater management planning and implementation for structures.
Habitat Restoration - Shoreland
10099477
Grant Awarded
Adams Co. proposes to establish four shoreline protection/restoration sites for demonstration purposes on Camelot Lake, and to cost share on similar practices on 27 privately owned parcels. Major project elements include: 1) riprap and anchored log shoreline stabalization, 2) establishment and maintenance of 35' vegetated buffer strips, 3) stormwater management planning and implementation for structures.
ATTAINS Alternative Restoration Approach
Adams Co. established four shoreline protection/restoration sites for demonstration purposes on Camelot Lake, and to cost share on similar practices on 27 privately owned parcels. Major project elements include: 1) riprap and anchored log shoreline stabalization, 2) establishment and maintenance of 35' vegetated buffer strips, 3) stormwater management planning and implementation for structures.Project to protect waters in the grant area
 
Watershed
 
Waters