Impaired Water - Carpenter Creek (Carpenter Creek)
Waushara County, Wisconsin
WR02
248800
0.00 - 6.06
6.06
Water is impaired due to one or more pollutants and associated quality impacts.
Notes
The Carpenter Creek TMDL restoration plan was approved in 2004 and covers the 2002 sediment and degraded habitat listings. There is a lot of ditching by headwaters.

This portion of Carpenter Creek was evaluated for temperature in 2016, 2018, and 2020. Elevated temperature was found in 2016, but this is not seen in 2020. The temperature listing is proposed for deletion in the 2020 cycle.
Listing Details
Pollutant
Unknown Pollutant
Listed For
Fish and Aquatic Life
Impairments
Elevated Water Temperature
Current Use
Coldwater - stocked, reproduction
Listing Status
Deletion
Attainable Use
Coldwater - stocked, reproduction
Priority
Not Applicable
Designated Use
Coldwater - stocked, reproduction
303(d) ID
2016-047
Listing Date
4/1/2016
Impaired Water Notes
This water was assessed during the 2016 listing cycle; temperature data exceeded 2016 WisCALM listing thresholds for the Fish and Aquatic Life use.
Date
8/30/2015

Impaired Water Notes
This water was assessed during the 2020 listing cycle; new temperature sample data were clearly below 2020 WisCALM listing thresholds for the Aquatic Life use. Removal of this listing is proposed.
Date
8/13/2019

 
Pollutant
Sediment/Total Suspended Solids
Listed For
Fish and Aquatic Life
Impairments
Degraded Habitat
Current Use
Coldwater - stocked, reproduction
Listing Status
TMDL Approved
Attainable Use
Coldwater - stocked, reproduction
Priority
Not Applicable
Designated Use
Coldwater - stocked, reproduction
303(d) ID
651
Listing Date
4/1/2002
Impaired Water Notes
Carpenter Creek is 6.0 miles in length. This stream flows in a southerly direction before emptying into the Pine River. The creek and its watershed are entirely in Waushara County. Carpenter Creek is located within the Carpenter Creek subwatershed, one of 12 subwatersheds that make up the Pine River Willow Creek Watershed of the Wolf River Basin. The 12.7 square mile drainage area to Carpenter Creek is 42% of the area of Carpenter Creek subwatershed as described in the Pine River/ Willow Creek Priority Watershed Project.

The lack of exposed gravel substrate greatly limits the spawning in Carpenter Creek. The filling-in of riffle areas (measured as embeddedness) reduces reproductive success of trout by reducing inter-gravel flow which is necessary to maintain suitable temperature and oxygen conditions for eggs and fry. Sedimentation of riffle areas also reduces suitable habitat for macroinvertebrates and other fish food organisms. Fillingin of pools reduces the amount of available cover for juvenile and adult fish. The sand
substrate reduces the amount of suitable habitat for fish, and fish food organisms. Macroinvertebrate biomass is generally lower in areas with a predominantly sand substrate with a mix of gravel, rubble and sand. There is extensive drainage of riparian wetlands adjacent to Carpenter Creek. Several lateral ditches appear to contribute both sediment and warmer water to the stream.

A description of the population, soils, topography, geology and other physical
characteristics of the Pine River/ Willow Creek Priority Watershed is contained in Chapter 2 of A Nonpoint Source Control Plan for the Pine River/ Willow Creek Priority Watershed Project. For a map of Carpenter Creek Subwatershed, please see Map 2-3 in Chapter 2 of the Plan.
Date
3/20/2011

Impaired Water Notes
Critical Condition The extensive sedimentation is a year-round situation. As such, there is no “critical condition”. This is not to say that there is not variation on the sediment carried in runoff to a stream. (See section on Seasonal Variation below).

Water Quality Standards
Carpenter Creek for its entire length is not currently meeting applicable narrative water quality criterion as defined in NR 102.04 (1); Wis. Adm. Code:
“To preserve and enhance the quality of waters, standards are established to
govern water management decisions. Practices attributable to municipal,
industrial, commercial, domestic, agricultural, land development or other
activities shall be controlled so that all waters including the mixing zone and
effluent channel meet the following conditions at all times and under all flow
conditions: (a) Substances that will cause objectionable deposits on the shore or in the bed of a water, shall not be present in such amounts as to interfere with public rights in waters of the state.”

Excessive sedimentation is considered as an objectionable deposit.
The designated uses applicable to Carpenter Creek are as follows:
S. NR 102.04(3) intro, (a) and (b), Wis. Adm. Code: "FISH AND OTHER AQUATIC LIFE USES. The department shall classify all surface waters into one of the fish and other aquatic life subcategories described in this subsection. Only those use subcategories identified in pars. (a) to (c)
shall be considered suitable for the protection and propagation of a balanced fish and other aquatic life community as provided in the federal water pollution control act amendments of 1972, P.L. 92-500; 33 USC 1251 et.seq.
"(a) Cold water communities. This subcategory includes surface waters
capable of supporting a community of cold water fish and aquatic life, or
serving as a spawning area for cold water fish species. This subcategory
includes, but is not restricted to, surface waters identified as trout water
by the department of natural resources (Wisconsin Trout Streams,
publication 6-3600 (80)).

“(b) Warm water sport fish communities. This subcategory includes
surface waters capable of supporting a community of warm water sport
fish or serving as a spawning area for warm water sport fish.

“ (c) Warm water forage fish communities. This subcategory includes
surface waters capable of supporting an abundant diverse community of
forage fish and other aquatic life.” Presently, Carpenter Creek is classified as Class II cold water. It received fair aquatic life habitat ratings both in the upper and lower reaches. Carpenter Creek has the potential to improve with the reduction in sediment and phosphorus loading and the enhancement of wetlands. A reduction would stabilize dissolved oxygen levels, decrease sediment accumulation in the streambed, and decrease overall loading to the
Pine River. Stream channelization, the shifting sand substrate, beaver activity and increased water temperature, and the dam on the Pine River also have a negative impact on the coldwater fish communities and water quality of this subwatershed. Sediment inhibits the spawning and limits the habitat for aquatic insects, reducing the food source.

Existing Sediment Loads
Glacial features largely dictate the relief in the region. Much of the Pine River/ Willow Creek watershed, including the Carpenter Creek subwatershed, is located within the Central Plains Geographic Province of Wisconsin. The land to the east of the villages of Wild Rose and Wautoma gradually flatten into a gently rolling lake plain.
Date
3/21/2011

Impaired Water Notes
Carpenter Creek is 6.0 miles in length. This stream flows in a southerly direction before emptying into the Pine River. The creek and its watershed are entirely in Waushara County. Carpenter Creek is located within the Carpenter Creek subwatershed, one of 12 subwatersheds that make up the Pine River Willow Creek Watershed of the Wolf River Basin. The 12.7 square mile drainage area to Carpenter Creek is 42% of the area of Carpenter Creek subwatershed as described in the Pine River/ Willow Creek Priority Watershed Project.

The lack of exposed gravel substrate greatly limits the spawning in Carpenter Creek. The filling-in of riffle areas (measured as embeddedness) reduces reproductive success of trout by reducing inter-gravel flow which is necessary to maintain suitable temperature and oxygen conditions for eggs and fry. Sedimentation of riffle areas also reduces suitable habitat for macroinvertebrates and other fish food organisms. Fillingin of pools reduces the amount of available cover for juvenile and adult fish. The sand substrate reduces the amount of suitable habitat for fish, and fish food organisms. Macroinvertebrate biomass is generally lower in areas with a predominantly sand substrate with a mix of gravel, rubble and sand. There is extensive drainage of riparian wetlands adjacent to Carpenter Creek. Several lateral ditches appear to contribute both sediment and warmer water to the stream.
Date
11/12/2004

Impaired Water Notes
One more year to make a decision on the status of Carpenter Creek -- waiting for comprehensive thermal data that is being collected this year, 2010.
Date
10/24/2009

Impaired Water Notes
Carpenter Creek sediment TMDL was approved December 13, 2004.
Date
5/8/2012