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Rare animals
Find rare and non-game animals.
Rare plants
Learn about plants on the Natural Heritage Working List.
Rare lichens
Discover Wisconsin's lichens.
Natural communities
Explore Wisconsin's natural communities.
Other features
Discover unique resources.
Contact information
For information on the native plants, contact:
Amy Staffen
Conservation Biologist
608-261-0747

Plant native plants to help nature

Help nature banner

Is your yard feeding nature? By planting native plants, you can support the entire food web by providing food for insects. Insects feed other insects, birds, bats, small mammals, fish and other wildlife.

Making sure insects have the food they need is particularly important now that scientists are documenting global declines in insect populations. If insects decline, so does everything else.

Native plants have evolved along with the insects that eat them; they are able to detoxify and digest native plants. Most insects lack the enzymes necessary to eat nonnative plants, like the ornamental trees and other plants so common in landscaping.

Even adding a few native plants to your backyard or balcony can help wildlife by feeding them and providing shelter. Get started with these basic resources or find more in-depth guides at the links below.

Help nature. Plant Natives.

Planting basics

Buying native plants

Garden Tour Videos

Take a garden tour with DNR Conservation Biologist, Amy Staffen as she showcases her own native plants and provides a few tips and tricks for maximizing your yard for Wisconsin wildlife.

Dig deeper

Interested in more detailed guides offering more plant selections? Try these other resources and partners.

Contact information
For information on the native plants, contact:
Amy Staffen
Conservation Biologist
608-261-0747
Last revised: Wednesday June 19 2019