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NEWS ARCHIVE:     Age: 538 days

Even adding a few native plants to your yard or balcony can benefit wildlife

Contact(s): Amy Staffen, 608-261-0747, Amy.Staffen@wisconsin.gov or Kelly Kearns, 608-267-5066, Kelly.Kearns@wisconsin.gov
April 30, 2019



Plant lists, list of native plant nurseries and sales available on DNR website

MADISON - With monarchs and many other butterflies and bees in decline, homeowners can do their part to help conserve these and other wildlife they love by adding native plants to their backyards or balconies. Even adding a few native plant species, or a single "wildlife workhorse," can help feed and shelter wildlife.

Native plant lists, lists of native plant nurseries and sales, and more information can be found on the Department of Natural Resources website, dnr.wi.gov, by searching "native plants."

Wild bergamont is a "wildlife workhorse," a single species you can plant to benefit an array of wildlife. Here, an endangered rusty patched bumble bee collects nectar and pollen. - Photo credit: Jay Watson
Wild bergamont is a "wildlife workhorse," a single species you can plant to benefit an array of wildlife. Here, an endangered rusty patched bumble bee collects nectar and pollen.Photo credit: Jay Watson

"Native plants are the best choice for backyard habitat," says Amy Staffen, a DNR conservation biologist with an expertise in native plants. "They are hardy, low maintenance, and there are native plants to suit every purpose, whether it's for formal landscaping or providing habitat."

Adding native plants can help for reasons including:

Native plants also are ideal shelters for native animals to breed and to hide from predators and weather, and they also can help keep Wisconsin lakes and rivers and drinking water clean, Staffen says. Their deep and complex root systems filter pollutants from runoff and slow it down.

DNR Conservation Biologist Amy Staffen admires native rue-anemone in her yard. - Photo credit: DNR
DNR Conservation Biologist Amy Staffen admires native rue-anemone in her yard.Photo credit: DNR

Read Amy Staffen's story of turning her urban lawn into a native plant garden and rain garden, and her "Four ways to incorporate native plants into your home landscape" in the DNR Natural Heritage Conservation Program landowner newsletter [PDF].

Add one or two "wildlife workhorse" species, or more to bloom across the seasons

Homeowners wanting to start small can add a single "wildlife workhorse" species like American hazelnut (Corylus americana) or wild bergamont (Monarda fistulosa) to their backyard and help a variety of wildlife, Staffen says. Both of these attractive plants grow statewide in a wide variety of conditions from sun to shade.

Homeowners interested in diving a little deeper can plant specifically for monarchs, pollinators, birds and other wildlife. A variety of lists provide a selection of plants that bloom from spring to fall so homeowners can help wildlife across the seasons while having a colorful garden.

"Be sure to plant species native to Wisconsin and to your specific area," Staffen says. For the best chance of success with the plants, buy native plants sourced from within 50 miles north or south and from within 100 miles east or west of your property.

Native plant nurseries and native plant sales part of growing options for buying native plants

Options for buying native plants in 2019 include the growing number of Wisconsin native plant nurseries [PDF] and native plant sales [PDF] put on by conservation organizations and nature centers. These are the native plant sales DNR is aware of that are sponsored by nature centers and conservation organizations.

Last Revised: Tuesday, April 30, 2019

Contact information

Need an expert? Contact the Office of Communications.

The Office of Communications connects journalists with DNR experts on a wide range of topics. For the fastest response, please email DNRPress@Wisconsin.gov and the first available Communications Specialist will respond to you.