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Wisconsin Natural Resources magazine

Wisconsin Natural Resources magazine

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Black bears like large forested areas with swamps and streams mixed in, similar to the landscape in the northern two-thirds of Wisconsin. © Herbert Lang

October 2004

Project timeline

Looking toward the future

Karl Martin, Natasha Kassulke and Tony Rinaldi


Black bears like large forested areas with swamps and streams mixed in, similar to the landscape in the northern two-thirds of Wisconsin.

© Herbert Lang

The timeline below is tentative for the DNR study on the Argonne, Northern Highland-American Legion and Flambeau. This is due to the extended period it covers and because the study is highly dependent on locating research sites and available funding. Assessments will include treatments on both state and USDA Forest Service lands.

Contents
  • 2001-2003 – Select study sites and locate grid points within each stand; collect vegetation data as time permits. Evaluate and characterize sites and vegetation. Develop techniques and information needed to evaluate economic alternatives of the various treatments.

  • 2004 – Collect first year of pretreatment data. Inventory avian populations. Quantify vegetation, coarse woody debris and snags at each site. Begin installing deer exclosures.

  • 2005 – Conduct second year of pretreatment data collection and quantify vegetation, coarse woody debris, and snags at each test site. Complete installation of deer exclosures.

  • 2005-2006 – Begin treatments in fall and continue through the winter--ideally complete all treatments within six months. Calculate operating costs of each treatment. Develop and erect signs for the demonstration areas.

  • 2006 – Finish treatments in winter. Conduct first year of post-treatment. Quantify and map each stand and compare to proposed treatments. Sample birds, small mammals, vegetation, coarse woody debris and snags. Develop technical report on treatment types and an economic analysis of each treatment.

  • 2007 – Continue post-treatment data collection, analysis of data and report writing.

  • 2008 – Conduct third and final year of post-treatment data collection and produce reports and articles on the effectiveness of treatments, economics of the various treatments, and impact of treatments on understory and overstory vegetation, small mammals, birds, and amphibians.

  • 2013 – Begin long-term monitoring of these sites (vegetation and vertebrates) to be conducted every three to five years. Propose additional treatments as part of a long-term management approach. Potential future treatments include thinning/harvesting, creating gaps and managing reserve trees, coarse woody debris and snags.

Natasha Kassulke is the associate editor of Wisconsin Natural Resources magazine.