Watershed - Middle Wolf River (WR14)
Middle Wolf River Watershed

Details

The 128-square-mile Middle Wolf River Watershed is in Shawano, Waupaca and Outagamie Counties. The watershed extends from the Shawano Dam to where the Shioc River meets the Wolf River north of Shiocton and holds 47 miles of the Wolf River. The Winnebago Comprehensive Management Plan ranked the Middle Wolf River watershed a high priority due to animal waste problems and soil erosion rates of 3.1 tons/acre/year. The data search for the Wolf River Basin Plan found that streams of this watershed, including the mainstem Wolf River, are suffering from streambank erosion and animal waste problems. Groundwater concerns were ranked as medium under the priority watershed selection process. The northern 20 percent of the watershed are of highest concern for groundwater contamination due to poor land use practices. The remaining 80 percent of the land is of medium susceptibility (WDNR and WGNHS, 1987).

Date  2001

Ecological Landscapes for Middle Wolf River Watershed

Ecological Landscapes

The Middle Wolf River Watershed lies in two ecological landscapes: The Central Lake Michigan Coastal Landscape in the south and the Northern Lake Michigan Coastal Landscape in the north. The Central Lake Michigan Coastal Ecological Landscape stretches from southern Door County west across Green Bay to the Wolf River drainage, then southward in a narrowing strip along the Lake Michigan shore to central Milwaukee County. Owing to the influence of Lake Michigan in the eastern part of this landscape, summers there are cooler, winters warmer, and precipitation levels greater than at locations farther inland. Dolomites and shales underlie the glacial deposits that blanket virtually all of the Central Lake Michigan Coastal Ecological Landscape. The dolomite Niagara Escarpment is the major bedrock feature, running across the entire landscape from northeast to southwest. Series of dolomite cliffs provide critical habitat for rare terrestrial snails, bats, and specialized plants. The primary glacial landforms are ground moraine, outwash, and lakeplain. The topography is generally rolling where the surface is underlain by ground moraine, variable over areas of outwash, and nearly level where lacustrine deposits are present. Important soils include clays, loams, sands, and gravels. Certain landforms, such as sand spits, clay bluffs, beach and dune complexes, and ridge and swale systems, are associated only with the shorelines of Lake Michigan and Green Bay. Historically, most of this landscape was vegetated with mesic hardwood forest composed primarily of sugar maple, basswood, and beech. Hemlock and white pine were locally important, but hemlock was generally restricted to cool moist sites near Lake Michigan. Areas of poorly drained glacial lakeplain supported wet forests of tamarack, white cedar, black ash, red maple, and elm, while the Wolf and Embarrass Rivers flowed through extensive floodplain forests of silver maple, green ash, and swamp white oak. Emergent marshes and wet meadows were common in and adjacent to lower Green Bay, while Lake Michigan shoreline areas featured beaches, dunes, interdunal wetlands, marshes, and highly diverse ridge and swale vegetation. Small patches of prairie and oak savanna were present in the southwestern portion of this landscape. The Northern Lake Michigan Coastal Ecological Landscape is located in northeastern Wisconsin, and includes Green Bay and the northern part of the Door Peninsula. Its landforms consist of the Niagara escarpment, a prominent dolomite outcropping along the east side of Green Bay, a lacustrine plain along the west side of Green Bay, and ground moraine elsewhere. Low sand dunes and beach ridges that support Great Lakes endemics and many other rare species are found along the Great Lakes shoreline. The influence of Lake Michigan moderates extreme temperatures. Soils are very diverse; in some areas, lacustrine sands are found overlying clays or bedrock within only a few feet of the surface. In the Door Peninsula, soils are typically stony loamy sands to loams. Poorly drained sands are common in the lake plain or in depressions between dunes and beach ridges. On the western side of Green Bay, the ground moraine is composed mostly of moderately well drained, rocky sandy loams, interspersed with lacustrine sands and clays, and peat and muck also common. Historic vegetation included maple-basswood-beech forest, hemlock-hardwood forest, northern white cedar swamp, hardwood-conifer swamp, wet meadows, and coastal marshes. Conifer dominated upland forests that resemble the boreal forest were present along Lake Michigan; they contain a significant component of white spruce and balsam fir. Cliffs, sinkholes, and dolomite ledges are associated with the Niagara Escarpment. Current vegetation consists of more than 60% non-forested land, most of which is in agricultural crops, with smaller amounts of grassland, wetland, shrubland, and urbanized areas. Forested lands are dominated by maple-basswood, with smaller amounts of lowland hardwoods, aspen-birch, and lowland conifers. High quality areas of exposed alkaline bedrock beach occur on the northern Door Peninsula, providing habitat for many rare plants. Several islands lie off the Door Peninsula and these also provide critical habitat for rare species and colonially nesting birds.

Date  2010

Watershed Documents
Watershed Grants
Grant Details
Aquatic Invasives Early Detection and Response
Date
2/22/2006
Waters Involved
Long Lake
Status
Complete

Long Lake Association - Shawano County, Inc.: Long Lake Ais Rapid Response Project: The Long Lake Property Owners Association proposes to manage Eurasian water-milfoil (EWM) in Long Lake by implementing control and prevention measures during the period 2006 - 2007. The project elements and deliverables are specified in the Long Lake Property Owners Association Aquatic Invasive Species Control Grant application, dated February 1, 2006. The project includes conducting pre- and post-treatment surveys and mapping the extent of EWM; controlling EWM with aquatic herbicide treatments and through hand-pulling; training volunteers to conduct post-treatment assessments and conducting those assessments to determine treatment efficacy; training volunteers to monitor for aquatic invasive species (AIS) and conducting those surveys; educating volunteers about AIS prevention measures through the "Clean Boats, Clean Waters" program; and educating residents about AIS prevention measures through newsletters, mailings and/or meetings. Annual progress reports and a final report summarizing the two-year project will be provided to DNR.

If consultant is to provide the final report, it is recommended the Grantee provide the DNR Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator with a draft for comment on report adequacy prior to making final payment to the consultant. DNR to receive both paper and electronic .pdf copies of the final report along with, or prior to, submission of grantee's final payment request.


Grant Details
Aquatic Invasives Early Detection and Response
Date
9/15/2011
Waters Involved
Long Lake
Status
Complete

Long Lake Association - Shawano County, Inc.: Long Lake Clp Rapid Response: Long Lake Property Owners Assoc. proposes to control Curly-leaf Pondweed (CLP) in Long Lake by implementing control measures duing the period of 2011-2015. The project elements and deliverables are specified in the Long Lake Aquatic Invasive Emergency Response Grant application dated 9/15/11. The project includes conducting pre- and post-treatment moinitoring; controlling CLP with aquatic herbicide treatments if determined necessary and hand pulling where applicable. At least one Long Lake Association Member or lake resident will be trained and will conduct Citizen Lake Monitoring (CLMN) following department protocols during the duration of the project. CLMN data will be submitted to the department annually. Prior to the 2012 spring treatment, preferably following iceout, a treatment map will be submitted to the department as a requirement of the permit application.

Annual progress reports and a final report summarizing the project will be providedd to DNR. Any publications produced as part of the project will incorporate the "Stop Aquatic Hitchihikers!" brand (partnership details can be found at: http://www.protectyour waters.org). If a consultant is to provide the final report, it is recommended that the Grantee rpovide the DNR Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator with a dreaft for comment on report adequacy prior to making final payment to theconsultant. DNR will be provided both paper and electronic .pdf copies of the final report along with, or prior to, submission of grantee's final payment request.

Amendment #1 - The project has been amended to include construction of a DASH unit and handpulling. A map identifying the DASH locations will be submitted to the Department as a requirement of the permit application.


Grant Details
Aquatic Invasives Early Detection and Response
Date
2/22/2006
Waters Involved
Schoenick Creek
Status
Complete

Long Lake Association - Shawano County, Inc.: Long Lake Ais Rapid Response Project: The Long Lake Property Owners Association proposes to manage Eurasian water-milfoil (EWM) in Long Lake by implementing control and prevention measures during the period 2006 - 2007. The project elements and deliverables are specified in the Long Lake Property Owners Association Aquatic Invasive Species Control Grant application, dated February 1, 2006. The project includes conducting pre- and post-treatment surveys and mapping the extent of EWM; controlling EWM with aquatic herbicide treatments and through hand-pulling; training volunteers to conduct post-treatment assessments and conducting those assessments to determine treatment efficacy; training volunteers to monitor for aquatic invasive species (AIS) and conducting those surveys; educating volunteers about AIS prevention measures through the "Clean Boats, Clean Waters" program; and educating residents about AIS prevention measures through newsletters, mailings and/or meetings. Annual progress reports and a final report summarizing the two-year project will be provided to DNR.

If consultant is to provide the final report, it is recommended the Grantee provide the DNR Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator with a draft for comment on report adequacy prior to making final payment to the consultant. DNR to receive both paper and electronic .pdf copies of the final report along with, or prior to, submission of grantee's final payment request.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
10/24/1991
Waters Involved
Long Lake
Status
Complete

Long Lake Property Owners Association: Long Lake Management Planning: ASSEMBLE AND REVIEW DATA, IDENTIFY GAPS IN DATA, INITIATE WATER MONITORING PROGRAM, MONITOR AGRICULTURE-RELATED NONPOINT SOURCE LOADS. PREPARE AN EVALUATION OF LAKE'S WATER QUALITY. PREPARE A BASE MAP OF THE LAKE AND ITS WATERSHED. DESIGN AND DISTRIBUTE A SURVEY TO LAKESURE RESIDENTS. ASSESSMENT OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR FUTURE PUBLIC ACCESS. DRAFT FINAL REPORT.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
10/1/1996
Waters Involved
Long Lake
Status
Complete

Long Lake Property Owners Association, Inc.: Long Lake Hydrologic And Watershed Pollution Sources Study: The Long Lake Property Owners Association proposes to study the lake's hydrology and pollution sources within the lake's watershed. The project will result in a final report detailing the study's results. The Department of Natural Resources will be provided with a paper copy and an electronic copy of the final report. Information about the project will be disseminated to the public by public meeting.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
10/1/1996
Waters Involved
Wolf River
Status
Complete

Wolf River Preservation Association: Wolf River Watershed Management Planning - Phase 2: The Wolf River Preservation Association proposes to continue watershed management planning activities. Phase 2 project activities include continuing water quality monitoring, conducting a recreational use survey, continuing to assess erosional areas, continuing to identify exotic species, and preparation of a report summarizing the data collected and analyses performed. The sponsor will provide the Department of Natural Resources with both a paper copy and an electronic copy of the report. Information about the results of phase 2 activities will be disseminated to the public by newsletter, fact sheet, public meeting, and local newspaper article.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2002
Waters Involved
Schoenick Creek
Status
Complete

Fox Wolf Watershed Alliance: Schoenick Creek Watershed Improvement Project Phase I: Fox-Wolf 2000 proposes to work with the Schoenick Creek Task Force and the UW-Stevens Point Environmental Task Force to conduct surface water quality assessments of Schoenick Creek. The sampling will consist of base flow and event sampling at 7 sites. The assessment will be used to determine if the water quality problems are associated with groundwater or runoff issues. A second component will be the establishment of a long-term volunteer monitoring team to continue monitoring water quality within the Schoenick Creek watershed. The third component will be watershed landowner education of the project by sending out a letter explaining the sampling and a public meeting.

The Department of Natural Resources will be provided with both a paper copy and electronic copy of the surface water quality assessment.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2002
Waters Involved
Schoenick Creek
Status
Complete

Fox Wolf Watershed Alliance: Schoenick Creek Watershed Improvement Project Phase Ii: Fox-Wolf 2000 proposes to work with the Schoenick Creek Task Force and the UW-Stevens Point Environmental Task Force to conduct surface water quality monitoring on Long and Schoenick Lakes. Groundwater sampling will be done at inflow and outflow locations of Long Lake. As a result of the sampling, a nutrient budget will be developed for both Long and Schoenick Lakes. The final product of Phase II will be a final report of the current water quality of the Schoenick Creek watershed. A public meeting will be held to disseminate the results and as a result of the study and landowner input, a water quality improvement plan will be developed.

The Department of Natural Resources will be provided with both a paper copy and an electronic copy of all assessments and plans.


Monitoring & Projects

Projects including grants, restoration work and studies shown below have occurred in this watershed. Click the links below to read through the text. While these are not an exhaustive list of activities, they provide insight into the management activities happening in this watershed.

Grants and Management Projects
Middle Wolf River Watershed
Watershed Recommendations
Hire County Aquatic Invasives Coordinator
 
Date
Status
Aquatic Invasives County Coordinator - Shawano County
1/1/2011
Not Proposed
Projects
 
Hire County Aquatic Invasives Coordinator
 
Date
Status
Hire Aquatic Invasives (AIS) County Coordinator - Outagamie
1/1/2011
Not Proposed
Projects
 
Monitor Fish Tissue
Confirm FCA: IW listed from pre-year 2000 FCA data
Date
Status
241300 name Wolf River-Main Stem TMDL ID 617 Start Mile 65.58 End Mile 85.58
11/21/2011
Proposed
 
Monitor Water Quality or Sediment
Unnamed W Trib to Schoenick Cr TP
Date
Status
New 303(d) Listing for Biology (5A). 2018 TP Results: May Exceed. Station: 10016411. AU: 3997977.
1/1/2018
Proposed
 
Monitor Water Quality or Sediment
Schoenick Creek TP
Date
Status
New Category 2 based on mIBI. 2018 TP Results: May Exceed. Station: 10042835. AU: 9814.
1/1/2018
Proposed
 
Middle Wolf River WatershedWatershed History Note