Watershed - Beaver Creek - Juneau (LW28)
Beaver Creek - Juneau Watershed

Details

All streams in the Beaver Creek Watershed, located in Juneau, Monroe, and Jackson Counties, ultimately drain to the Lemonweir River. Numerous impoundments are found throughout the watershed, some of which are used for cranberry production and others are managed for wildlife production or fishing. Land adjacent to many flowages is county, state or federally owned. The Beaver Creek Watershed is located in the driftless region of the state, which was covered at one time by glacial melt water, also known as Glacial Lake Wisconsin. Evidence of the ancient lakebed in this watershed is found in the extensive acreage of wetlands (122 square miles). Forests also account for a large portion of land cover in the watershed. Since over three-fourths of the Beaver Creek Watershed is either forested, wetland, or open water, nonpoint sources of pollution are not as pervasive as in other watersheds where agriculture prevails. The nonpoint source ranking of the watershed for lakes and groundwater is low.

Date  2002

Population, Land Use

Population in the watershed for the year 2000 was estimated at 3,956. Population pressure in the watershed is low and the two incorporated municipalities have seen negative population growth over the last decade. There are also three unincorporated municipalities, Mather, Norway Ridge, and Valley Junction in the Beaver Creek Watershed. County, state or federal agencies manage much of the land in the watershed. More cranberry bogs are found in the Beaver Creek Watershed than throughout the entire Lower Wisconsin River Basin. As a result, the main nonpoint source concern in this watershed is the result of the diversion of water from trout streams and the flooding of high quality wetlands for cranberry production. Poor forest harvesting practices in the watershed also have an impact on surface waters.

Date  2002

Nonpoint and Point Sources

Elevated levels of atrazine, a herbicide used on corn, has been found in some tested private water wells in the town of La Grange along Mill Creek. Soils are permeable, which allows atrazine to reach groundwater in some locations. Warrens is the only permitted municipal wastewater treatment plant in the Beaver Creek Watershed. Ocean Spray Cranberries, Inc. is the only permitted industrial discharge. Both facilities discharge treated wastewater to groundwater.

Date  2002

Ecological Landscapes for Beaver Creek - Juneau Watershed

Ecological Landscapes

The Beaver Creek Watershed is primarily located in the Central Sand Plains Ecological Landscape which is located in central Wisconsin, occurs on a flat, sandy lake plain, and supports agriculture, forestry, recreation, and wildlife management. The Ecological Landscape formed in and around what was once Glacial Lake Wisconsin, which contained glacial meltwater extending over 1.1 million acres at its highest stage. Soils are primarily sandy lake deposits, some with silt-loam loess caps. Sandstone buttes carved by rapid drainage of the glacial lake, or by wave action when they existed as islands in the lake, are distinctive features of this landscape. The historic vegetation of the area included extensive wetlands of many types, including open bogs, shrub swamps, and sedge meadows. Prairies, oak forests, savannas and barrens also occurred in the Ecological Landscape. An area of more mesic forest with white pine and hemlock was found in the northwest portion, including a significant pinery in eastern Jackson County. Today, nearly half of the Ecological Landscape is nonforested, in agriculture and grassland. Most of the historic wetlands were drained early in the 1900s and are now used for vegetable cropping. The forested portion is mostly oak-dominated forest, followed by aspen and pines. A minor portion is maple-basswood forest and lowland hardwoods. The Beaver Creek Watershed has a variety of good quality habitats and rare plant communities that are listed on the state's Natural Heritage Inventory, (NHI), kept by the Bureau of Endangered Resources. These communities include: central sands pine-oak forest, floodplain forest, dry prairie, hardwood swamp, northern dry forest, northern sedge meadow, northern dry-mesic forest, northern wet forest, pine barrens, open bog, southern dry forest, southern sedge meadow, southern dry-mesic forest, stream-slow, soft, cold, central poor fen, tamarack swamp, emergent aquatic, and white pine-red maple.

Date  2002

Recreational Opportunities

The 44,000-acre Necedah National Wildlife Refuge, located in northwestern Juneau County, consists of woodlands, prairie and wetlands. Information regarding hiking, hunting, fishing and cross-county skiing in the refuge is found at the visitors center located just west of the Village of Necedah on Highway 21. The 90 square mile Meadow Valley State Wildlife Area is another large tract of land in this watershed that is leased to the state by the federal government for public use. This wildlife area is located along both sides of Highway 173 from Babcock to Valley Junction, with small plots of private land scattered throughout. Wetlands with several open water flowages and forest are the predominant land cover in the wildlife area. Several flowages are fully or partially set aside as waterfowl refuges used for nesting and feeding. The Meadow Valley State Wildlife Area can be used for hiking, fishing, hunting, and canoeing.

Date  2002

Wildlife and Habitat

The watershed is also home for a variety of rare plant and animal species including; 3 species of beetle, 15 species of birds, 10 species of dragonflies, 2 species of fish, 1 species of mussel, 22 plant species, 2 species of mammal, 6 species of butterflies, 1 species of lizard, 2 species of moth, 1 species of snake, 1 species of bug and 2 species of rasshoppers. These plants and animals are also listed on the state's Natural Heritage Inventory.

Date  2002

Watershed Grants
Grant Details
Aquatic Invasives Education
Date
3/12/2008
Waters Involved
Lemonweir River
Status
Complete

Golden Sands Rc&D: Cbcw Volunteer Supplies: The Golden Sands RC&D Council, Inc. proposes to purchase and administer distribution of handbooks and other materials associated with the monitoring for and promotion of Clean Boats, Clean Water practices at public boat landings throughout the state. Major project elements include: 1) Purchase and distribution of materials, 2) Conducting workshops, 3) Project administration.


Grant Details
Aquatic Invasives Education
Date
3/12/2008
Waters Involved
New Lisbon Lake
Status
Complete

Golden Sands Rc&D: Cbcw Volunteer Supplies: The Golden Sands RC&D Council, Inc. proposes to purchase and administer distribution of handbooks and other materials associated with the monitoring for and promotion of Clean Boats, Clean Water practices at public boat landings throughout the state. Major project elements include: 1) Purchase and distribution of materials, 2) Conducting workshops, 3) Project administration.


Grant Details
Lake Protection Grant
Date
9/1/2010
Waters Involved
Lemonweir River
Status
Complete

Juneau County: Lco-Shoreland Ordinance Rev.: Juneau County proposes to amend or create a shoreland zoning ordinance that complies with the requirements of NR 115, Wisconsin Administrative Code (as revised effective February 1, 2010) and retain existing regulations that exceed the water resource protections of NR 115 or are specific or unique to local needs.

Project deliverables include: 1. Copies of any fact sheets or handouts created for public hearings. 2. A summary of the comments received at public hearings. 3. A certified copy of the County Board-approved updated shoreland ordinance or ordinance language (if integrated into other codes). 4. Any GIS maps of the shoreland zone or shoreland condition surveys related to the project.

Specific conditions for this Project: The WDNR will be provided electronic and hard copies of all data and or reports or surveys generated as a result of this project.


Grant Details
Lake Protection Grant
Date
9/1/2010
Waters Involved
Lemonweir River -Un Oxbow
Status
Complete

Juneau County: Lco-Shoreland Ordinance Rev.: Juneau County proposes to amend or create a shoreland zoning ordinance that complies with the requirements of NR 115, Wisconsin Administrative Code (as revised effective February 1, 2010) and retain existing regulations that exceed the water resource protections of NR 115 or are specific or unique to local needs.

Project deliverables include: 1. Copies of any fact sheets or handouts created for public hearings. 2. A summary of the comments received at public hearings. 3. A certified copy of the County Board-approved updated shoreland ordinance or ordinance language (if integrated into other codes). 4. Any GIS maps of the shoreland zone or shoreland condition surveys related to the project.

Specific conditions for this Project: The WDNR will be provided electronic and hard copies of all data and or reports or surveys generated as a result of this project.


Grant Details
Lake Protection Grant
Date
3/7/1997
Waters Involved
New Lisbon Lake
Status
Complete

City Of New Lisbon: Res- New Lisbon Lake Water Flow Restoration: The City of New Lisbon proposes to restore the historical water flows from the Lemonweir River under I-94 to New Lisbon lake by realigning the culverts under I-94. 2/26/97 Variance approved to accept costs incurred from DOT the previous year.


Grant Details
Lake Protection Grant
Date
9/1/2010
Waters Involved
Unnamed
Status
Complete

Juneau County: Lco-Shoreland Ordinance Rev.: Juneau County proposes to amend or create a shoreland zoning ordinance that complies with the requirements of NR 115, Wisconsin Administrative Code (as revised effective February 1, 2010) and retain existing regulations that exceed the water resource protections of NR 115 or are specific or unique to local needs.

Project deliverables include: 1. Copies of any fact sheets or handouts created for public hearings. 2. A summary of the comments received at public hearings. 3. A certified copy of the County Board-approved updated shoreland ordinance or ordinance language (if integrated into other codes). 4. Any GIS maps of the shoreland zone or shoreland condition surveys related to the project.

Specific conditions for this Project: The WDNR will be provided electronic and hard copies of all data and or reports or surveys generated as a result of this project.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
9/29/1995
Waters Involved
New Lisbon Lake
Status
Complete

City Of New Lisbon: New Lisbon Lake Culvert Install. Feasibility Study: Perform a feasibility study to determine the impact of installing five 60 inch culverts on New Lisbon Lake as part of the interstate reconstruction.
1. Conduct an hydrology evaluation to predict flow patterns before and after installation of culverts.
2. Perform a water quality analysis.
3. Predict impact of water characteristics in the lake section to be reconnected as it flushes into the main boty of the lake.
4. Study will be conducted on a mass balance basis and consider the effects on algal populations, sedimentation , and recreational uses.
5. Prepare a final report on the results of the above tasks.
6. Disseminate information on the project results to the public by fact sheet, public meeting, and newspaper article.


Grant Details
Small Scale Lake Planning
Date
10/1/2007
Waters Involved
Lemonweir River
Status
Complete

City Of New Lisbon: New Lisbon Map: The City of New Lisbon proposes to produce a bathymetric map of New Lisbon Lake in Juneau County. Major project elements to include: a) lake survey, b) map production, c) printing.


Grant Details
Small Scale Lake Planning
Date
10/1/2010
Waters Involved
Lemonweir River
Status
Complete

City Of New Lisbon: New Lisbon Map 2: The City of New Lisbon proposes to order the printing of 6000 copies of its new map of New Lisbon Lake in Juneau County.


Grant Details
Small Scale Lake Planning
Date
10/1/2007
Waters Involved
New Lisbon Lake
Status
Complete

City Of New Lisbon: New Lisbon Map: The City of New Lisbon proposes to produce a bathymetric map of New Lisbon Lake in Juneau County. Major project elements to include: a) lake survey, b) map production, c) printing.


Grant Details
Small Scale Lake Planning
Date
10/1/2010
Waters Involved
New Lisbon Lake
Status
Complete

City Of New Lisbon: New Lisbon Map 2: The City of New Lisbon proposes to order the printing of 6000 copies of its new map of New Lisbon Lake in Juneau County.


Monitoring & Projects

Projects including grants, restoration work and studies shown below have occurred in this watershed. Click the links below to read through the text. While these are not an exhaustive list of activities, they provide insight into the management activities happening in this watershed.

Beaver Creek - Juneau Watershed
Watershed Recommendations
Hire County Aquatic Invasives Coordinator
 
Date
Status
Hire Aquatic Invasives (AIS) County Coordinator - Juneau
1/1/2011
Not Proposed
Projects
 
Hire County Aquatic Invasives Coordinator
 
Date
Status
Hire Aquatic Invasives (AIS) County Coordinator - Jackson
1/1/2011
Not Proposed
Projects
 
Hire County Aquatic Invasives Coordinator
 
Date
Status
Hire Aquatic Invasives (AIS) County Coordinator - Monroe
1/1/2011
Not Proposed
Projects
 
Monitor Fish Community
 
Date
Status
The Lemonweir River should be assessed to determine if rare aquatic elements previously found are still present.
1/1/2010
Proposed
 
Beaver Creek - Juneau WatershedWatershed History Note

The Beaver Creek-Juneau Watershed is home to hundreds of acres of cranberry bogs. As one of the few fruits native to North America, Native Americans used the cranberries as a staple as early as 1550. They ate cranberries fresh, ground, or mashed with cornmeal and baked it into bread. They also mixed berries with wild game and melted fat to form pemmican, a survival ration for the winter months. Maple sugar or honey was used to sweeten the berry's tangy flavor. By 1620, Pilgrims learned how to use cranberries from the Native Americans. There are several theories of how the berry was named. Germany and Dutch settlers named the berry "crane-berry" because it appeared to be the favorite food of cranes or the blossom resembles the head and neck of an English crane. Eventually craneberry was shortened to cranberry. By 1683, cranberry juice was made by the settlers. The uses of cranberries are extensive — American whalers and mariners carried cranberries on-board to prevent scurvy while Indians brewed cranberry poultices to draw poison from arrow wounds and in tea to calm nerves as well as using the juice as a dye. Today commercial cranberry growers use a system of wetlands, uplands, ditches, flumes, ponds and other water bodies that provide a natural habitat for a variety of plant and animal life. Cranberry growers preserve almost 40,000 acres of open space which provide refuge for many plant and wildlife species. Cranberry wetlands filter groundwater, recharge aquifers and control flooding by retaining water runoff. Cranberries grow on low lying vines (not underwater) in impermeable beds layered with sand, peat, gravel and clay. These beds are known as "bogs" or "marshes" and were originally created by glacial deposits. Wisconsin grows almost 57% of the cranberries in the US.

Date  2011