Watershed - Reads and Tainter Creeks (LW03)
Reads and Tainter Creeks Watershed

Details

The Reads and Tainter Creeks watershed includes the main stem of the Kickapoo River from its confluence with the West Fork of the Kickapoo downstream to Gays Mills. The tributary streams to the Kickapoo have high gradients. Most of the wetlands found in the watershed are in the floodplain of the Kickapoo River. Many of these have been degraded due to grazing or cultivation. Land use in the watershed is agricultural mixed with woodlands. The erosion control plan for the Vernon County portion of the watershed estimates a soil loss of 7.3 tons per acre per year. The Tainter Creek portion of the watershed in Crawford County had the highest proportion of nonpoint source water pollution due to animal waste in the county according to the county's animal waste management plan. It also garnered the highest priority watershed ranking for the need to control soil erosion, according to the county's soil erosion control plan. Many of the streams in this watershed have a good potential for improvement if nonpoint source water pollution is controlled. Many of the Class II trout streams have the potential to become Class I trout streams.

Date  1994

Population, Land Use

The Gays Mills - Soldiers Grove area is the center of apple production in southwest Wisconsin. The only municipal dischargers to surface water in the watershed are Readstom and Soldiers Grove.

Date  1994

Ecological Landscapes for Reads and Tainter Creeks Watershed

Ecological Landscapes

The Western Coulee and Ridges Ecological Landscape in southwestern and west central Wisconsin is characterized by its highly eroded, driftless topography and relatively extensive forested landscape. Soils are silt loams (loess) and sandy loams over sandstone residuum over dolomite. Several large rivers including the Wisconsin, Mississippi, Chippewa, Kickapoo and Black flow through or border the Ecological Landscape. Historical vegetation consisted of southern hardwood forests, oak savanna, scattered prairies, and floodplain forests and marshes along the major rivers. With Euro-American settlement, most of the land on ridgetops and valley bottoms was cleared of oak savanna, prairie, and level forest for agriculture. The steep slopes between valley bottom and ridgetop, unsuitable for raising crops, grew into oak-dominated forests after the ubiquitous presettlement wildfires were suppressed. Current vegetation is a mix of forest (40%), agriculture, and grassland with some wetlands in the river valleys. The primary forest cover is oak-hickory (51%) dominated by oak species and shagbark hickory. Maple-basswood forests (28%), dominated by sugar maple, basswood and red maple, are common in areas that were not subjected to repeated presettlement wildfires. Bottomland hardwoods (10%) are common in the valley bottoms of major rivers and are dominated by silver maple, ashes, elms, cottonwood, and red maple. Relict conifer forests including white pine, hemlock and yellow birch are a rarer natural community in the cooler, steep, north slope microclimates.

Date  2010

Watershed Documents
Watershed Grants
Grant Details
Lake Protection Grant
Date
9/1/2010
Waters Involved
Kickapoo River
Status
Complete

Crawford County: Lco-Shoreland Ordinance Rev.: Crawford County proposes to amend or create a shoreland zoning ordinance that complies with the requirements of NR 115, Wisconsin Administrative Code (as revised effective February 1, 2010) and retain existing regulations that exceed the water resource protections of NR 115 or are specific or unique to local needs.

Project deliverables include: 1. Copies of any fact sheets or handouts created for public hearings. 2. A summary of the comments received at public hearings. 3. A certified copy of the County Board-approved updated shoreland ordinance or ordinance language (if integrated into other codes). 4. Any GIS maps of the shoreland zone or shoreland condition surveys related to the project.

Specific conditions for this Project: 1. The WDNR will be provided electronic and hard copies of all data and or reports or surveys generated as a result of this project.


Grant Details
Lake Protection Grant
Date
9/1/2010
Waters Involved
Unnamed
Status
Complete

Crawford County: Lco-Shoreland Ordinance Rev.: Crawford County proposes to amend or create a shoreland zoning ordinance that complies with the requirements of NR 115, Wisconsin Administrative Code (as revised effective February 1, 2010) and retain existing regulations that exceed the water resource protections of NR 115 or are specific or unique to local needs.

Project deliverables include: 1. Copies of any fact sheets or handouts created for public hearings. 2. A summary of the comments received at public hearings. 3. A certified copy of the County Board-approved updated shoreland ordinance or ordinance language (if integrated into other codes). 4. Any GIS maps of the shoreland zone or shoreland condition surveys related to the project.

Specific conditions for this Project: 1. The WDNR will be provided electronic and hard copies of all data and or reports or surveys generated as a result of this project.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
4/1/1997
Waters Involved
Unnamed
Status
Complete

Village Of Soldiers Grove: Myrtle Lake Water Quality And Sediment Plan: The village of soldiers Grove proposes to conduct the following lake management activities on Myrtle Lake: 1) Map the lake to determine the water volume and area to be dredged. 2) Prepare a cross section to identify volume and exact location of sediment to be dredged. 3) Plan for use of dredged material. 4) Prepare barnyard management plan to eliminate runoff to the lake. 5) Develop stormwater runoff plan for County Highway C near Myrtle Lake.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2004
Waters Involved
Kickapoo River
Status
Complete

The Valley Stewardship Network: Kickapoo Study-Outreach: The Valley Stewardship Network seeks to improve water quality data on the Kickapoo River in Monroe, Richland and Crawford counties, and enhance public understanding of potential impacts associated with development within the watershed. Major project elements to include: 1) water quality monitoring, 2) establishment of a GIS based bio-inventory, 3) outreach to recreational uses, property owners and developers.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2006
Waters Involved
Kickapoo River
Status
Complete

The Valley Stewardship Network: Kickapoo E.Coli 2: Valley Stewardship Network proposes to continue its outreach to and involvement of the public through continuation of it E.coli monitoring associated with the Kickapoo River watershed in Vernon, Crawford, Monroe and Richland counties. Major project elements to include: 1) water quality testing, 2) information and education, 3) final report.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2010
Waters Involved
Kickapoo River
Status
Complete

Valley Stewardship Network: Vsn Data And Access: The Valley Stewardship Network proposes to standardize and improve the availability of 10 years worth of watershed monitoring data on the Kickapoo River; to create an analysis plan and a strategic plan for future monitoring; to inventory public access sites on the Kickapoo; to update its organizational assessment; and to communicate with local governments, cooperating agencies and the general public through its website, coordinating efforts and events.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2011
Waters Involved
Kickapoo River
Status
Complete

Valley Stewardship Network: Vsn Outreach, Monitoring: The Valley Stewardship Network proposes to prepare an assessment of the Kickapoo River Watershed addressing historic watershed conditions, identifying gaps in monitoring data and forming the basis for future monitoring and outreach planning. Key project elements to include:
1) Draft and print Watershed Assessment, 2) Public and school presentations, 3) Web site enhancement, 4) Recruit, assist and train citizen monitors, 5) Water quality sampling and non-SLOH analysis, 6) Partner coordination.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
2/15/2016
Waters Involved
Tainter Creek
Status
Proposed

Valley Stewardship Network: Kickapoo Farmer-Led: The Valley Stewarship Network is sponsoring a project to initiate two farmer-led watershed councils to identify and cooperatively solve nutrient runnoff issues with conservation practices fundable though the Mississippi River Basin Healthy Watersheds Initiative (MRBI). Project activities and deliverables include: 1) mailings, meetings, and events to identify leaders and goals within Tainter and Knapp Creek watersheds, 2) establishment and facilitation of councils, 3) sociological surveys, 4) outreach and training re: MRBI conservation practices including water quality sampling, 5) data summarization with annual reports and mapping, 6) development of outreach materials for field day events, 7) pre and post-practice water quality samping and data entry (SWIMS), and 8) final report. This scope summarizes the project detail provided in the application and does not negate tasks/deliverables described therein. Data, records, and reports, including GIS-based maps and digital images must be submitted to the Department in a format specified by the regional Lake Planner. If consultant is to provide final report, it is recommended that Grantee provide the Lake Planner with a draft for comment on report adequacy prior to making final payment to the consultant. DNR to receive both paper and electronic .pdf copies of the final report along with, or prior to submission of the grantee's final payment request.


Reads and Tainter Creeks Watershed
Watershed Recommendations
Citizen-Based Stream Monitoring
Citizen Stream Monitoring
Date
Status
Collect chemical, physical, and/or biological water quality data to assess the current overall stream health. The data can inform management decisions and may be used to identify impaired waters for biennial lists.
1/1/2012
In Progress
Projects
 
Citizen-Based Stream Monitoring
Citizen Stream Monitoring
Date
Status
Collect chemical, physical, and/or biological water quality data to assess the current overall stream health. The data can inform management decisions and may be used to identify impaired waters for biennial lists.
1/1/2012
In Progress
Projects
 
Citizen-Based Stream Monitoring
Citizen Stream Monitoring
Date
Status
Collect chemical, physical, and/or biological water quality data to assess the current overall stream health. The data can inform management decisions and may be used to identify impaired waters for biennial lists.
1/1/2012
In Progress
Projects
 
Citizen-Based Stream Monitoring
Citizen Stream Monitoring
Date
Status
Collect chemical, physical, and/or biological water quality data to assess the current overall stream health. The data can inform management decisions and may be used to identify impaired waters for biennial lists.
1/1/2012
In Progress
Projects
 
Citizen-Based Stream Monitoring
Citizen Stream Monitoring
Date
Status
Collect chemical, physical, and/or biological water quality data to assess the current overall stream health. The data can inform management decisions and may be used to identify impaired waters for biennial lists.
1/1/2012
In Progress
Projects
 
Monitor Fish Tissue
 
Date
Status
WRM should monitor fish for the presence of toxic substances in the Kickapoo River above the Gays Mills dam (Type B).
1/1/2010
Proposed
 
Monitor Water Quality or Sediment
Kickapoo River TP
Date
Status
Category 3. 2018 TP Results: May Exceed. Station: 10029649. AU: 887133.
1/1/2018
Proposed
Projects
 
Rivers Management Grant
 
Date
Status
Water Resources Management should consider the Reads and Tainter Creeks Watershed a priority for selection as a priority watershed under the Wisconsin Nonpoint Source Water Pollution Abatement Program (Type B).
1/1/2010
Proposed
 
Reads and Tainter Creeks WatershedWatershed History Note

The Village of Soldiers Grove, located in the Reads and Tainter Creeks Watershed, drains to the Kickapoo River in Crawford County. Soldiers Grove was first settled in 1856 by Joseph H. Brightman, who began a sawmill at the site to process logs rafted down the Kickapoo River. The village, which sprang up near the sawmill, was initially named "Pine Grove" because of the abundance of Eastern White Pine in the vicinity. In 1867, the name of the village was changed to "Soldiers Grove" to commemorate the troops who had camped in the area during the Black Hawk War. In its early years, Soldiers Grove depended upon the Kickapoo River for timber rafting and hydropower for flour and lumber mills. The village's proximity to the river became a liability in the early twentieth century, however, when major floods began to afflict the settlement. Significant flooding occurred in 1907, 1912, 1917, and 1935. Following the last of these incidents, Soldiers Grove and other area communities petitioned the United States Congress to provide funds for a flood control project. Despite another major flood in 1951, Congress did not agree to a flood control plan until 1962, when it authorized a project that included levees and a flood control dam on the Kickapoo River upstream of Soldiers Grove near La Farge, Wisconsin. Owing largely to environmental concerns, however, construction of the proposed dam was halted partway through construction in 1975 and never finished. In the meantime, a 1974 floodplain zoning ordinance had already taken effect in Soldiers Grove, prohibiting new construction and severely limiting maintenance options near the river and crippling the village's downtown area. Rather than building and maintaining a levee, village leaders proposed that the federal funds already appropriated for levee construction be used instead to relocate the business district away from the floodplain. Federal agencies repeatedly denied this request, however. Even so, in 1977 the village used its own funds to purchase land on nearby high ground onto which the business district could eventually be relocated. In 1978, flooding again inundated the Soldiers Grove area. In the aftermath of the disaster, $900,000 in federal funds were finally provided to assist in relocating the village's business district to higher ground. Construction of the new business district began in 1979 and was completed by 1983. A park replaced the old downtown area along the river. Although major flooding occurred along the Kickapoo River again in 2007 and 2008, the village escaped major damage by virtue of the relocation. When Soldiers Grove began its relocation project in 1979, the United States was suffering from its second oil crisis in six years. In response to high energy costs, an energy task force for the Soldiers Grove relocation recommended that the new business district make use of solar heating as studies had demonstrated that it was feasible for new buildings to achieve a majority of their heat from solar energy. Consequently, the village enacted an unprecedented ordinance requiring that all new commercial buildings obtain at least 50% of their heat from the sun. Another law prohibited any new structure from blocking sunlight to another building. To meet the solar energy requirements, buildings in the new business district were constructed with heavy insulation and earth-berming to supply thermal mass. South facing roof slopes and windows were built to capture maximum sunlight, and blowers and hydronic systems were installed to circulate the collected heat. Over twenty solar heated businesses were eventually built in the small community.

Date  2010