Watershed - Bass Creek (LR03)
Bass Creek Watershed

Details

This 109-square miles watershed lies within Rock County west of and adjacent to the Rock River, and stretching from the state line at Beloit to just above Janesville. While predominately agricultural, there are significant urban areas at Janesville and Beloit. We know little about the water quality and use potential of the tributaries to Bass Creek and to the Rock River in this watershed. Stevens Creek may have potential for trout. Habitat surveys of portions of the watershed were conducted in May 1996. Two reaches of Bass Creek were surveyed and two portions of Stevens Creek were evaluated. The surveys indicated fair to poor streambank habitat with moderate to severe erosion in some areas, possibly due to streambank pasturing and degradation of water quantity and quality in upstream reaches. This watershed ranked high for funding under the state's priority watershed program. This watershed is ranked as a second priority for soil loss in Rock County. Rock County Land Conservation Department staff estimate about 3.4 miles of streambank are eroding. In the watershed, more than 59% of the cropland exceeds an average soil loss of about 7.5-8 tons/acre/year. There are 37 barnyards ranked high and 74 barnyards ranked medium by the barnyard ranking criteria used in the Turtle Creek priority watershed. Most of the problematic barnyards are located along Bass Creek and tributary headwaters in the north and west portions of the watershed. Bass Creek Land Conservation staff believe that this source of sediment and nutrients (barnyard and streambank pasturing) could be reduced through implementation of a priority watershed project. About 68% of the watershed's 63,198 acres are in cropland. This watershed has a high participation level in the Farmland Preservation Program; about 72% of eligible land is enrolled in the program. This watershed has a high susceptibility for groundwater contamination based on WDNR groundwater susceptibility mapping. Bass Creek watershed was selected as an Environmental Quality Improvement Program (EQIP) project. This program, funded by the U.S. Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS), targets critical watersheds for implementation of agricultural best management practices that will also protect water resources.

Date  2002

Population, Land Use

Agriculture is the dominant land use in the watershed, encompassing 76% of the landscape (Figure 1). Other land uses and coverage in the watershed include urban/ suburban (8%), forests (7%), open water/ open space (5%), and wetlands (3%). The remaining 1% (approximately) is barren and grasslands. While predominately agricultural, there are significant urban areas at Janesville and Beloit. The western side of the city of Beloit is at the mouth of this watershed. In the past the city of Beloit has experienced flooding problems on its west side and has recently designed and installed a stormwater detention wetland system to abate this problem. Cropland soil loss and barnyard runoff contribute to water quality issues. The Bass Creek watershed was designated a priority area for USDA-Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP) and the state’s Priority Watershed Program. Both programs have since closed. USDA provided funding to landowners interested in the implementation of water quality projects, such as barnyard and streambank improvements. Recently, the city and town of Beloit, and other surrounding towns, updated the Beloit Sewer Service Area Plan. This plan provides a guideline for locating sewered development for the next 20 years. Population projections used in the update indicated that while residential growth would be steady and perhaps declining during that time period, land was allocated to commercial and industrial development along I-90 to attract new business and spur residential growth, particularly in the Turtle Creek Watershed.

Date  2010

Nonpoint and Point Sources

There are no point source discharges to either Stevens Creek or Markham Creek. Sedimentation from stream bank erosion and runoff from agricultural practices within the watersheds are the suspected cause of habitat degradation in Stevens Creek and Markham Creek. Fine sediments covering the stream substrate reduce suitable habitat for fish and other biologi­cal communities by filling in pools and reducing available cover for juvenile and adult fish. Sedimentation of riffle areas compromises reproductive success of fish communities by covering gravel substrate necessary for spawning conditions. The filling in of riffle areas also affects the fish communities’ food source, macroinvertebrates, which have difficulty thriv­ing in areas with predominantly sand substrate as opposed to a substrate composed of gravel, cobble/rubble, and sand mixture. In addition, sedimentation can increase turbidity in the water column, causing reduced light penetration nec­essary for photosynthesis in aquatic plants, and reduced feeding capacity of aquatic macroinvertebrates due to clogged gill surfaces. Sedimentation of the substrate can also cause an increase in other contaminant levels, which are attached to sediment particles and transported into the stream during runoff events.

Date  2010

Ecological Landscapes for Bass Creek Watershed

Ecological Landscapes

The Southeast Glacial Plains Ecological Landscape makes up the bulk of the non-coastal land area in southeast Wisconsin. This Ecological Landscape is made up of glacial till plains and moraines. Most of this Ecological Landscape is composed of glacial materials deposited during the Wisconsin Ice Age, but the southwest portion consists of older, pre-Wisconsin till with a more dissected topography. Soils are lime-rich tills overlain in most areas by a silt-loam loess cap. Agricultural and residential interests throughout the landscape have significantly altered the historical vegetation. Most of the rare natural communities that remain are associated with large moraines or in areas where the Niagara Escarpment occurs close to the surface. Historically, vegetation in the Southeast Glacial Plains consisted of a mix of prairie, oak forests and savanna, and maple-basswood forests. Wet-mesic prairies, southern sedge meadows, emergent marshes, and calcareous fens were found in lower portions of the Landscape. End moraines and drumlins supported savannas and forests. Agricultural and urban land use practices have drastically changed the land cover of the Southeast Glacial Plains since Euro-American settlement. The current vegetation is primarily agricultural cropland. Remaining forests occupy only about 10% of the land area and consist of maple-basswood, lowland hardwoods, and oak. No large mesic forests exist today except on the Kettle Interlobate Moraine which has topography too rugged for agriculture. Some existing forest patches that were formerly savannas have succeeded to hardwood forest due to fire suppression.

Date  2010

Hydrologic Features

The Bass Creek Watershed is a small tributary dominant feature is Shawano Lake, which is interconnected to a series of inlet and outlet tributaries. The streams are differentiated by model results depicting flow and temperature, resulting in an estimate of 4.7 miles of cold-water streams, 1.8 miles of cool (cold transition) headwaters, 14.7 miles of cool (warm transition) headwaters, 2.48 miles of cool (warm transition) mainstem streams, 11.5 miles of macroinvertebrate streams, 4.2 miles of warm headwaters, 3 miles of Warm mainstem streams, and 30 miles where no classification is determined (likely due to the small size of the waters).

Date  2010

Bass Creek Watershed At-a-Glance

Impaired Water in Bass Creek Watershed
River and Stream QualityAll Waters in Watershed

Bass Creek, Stevens Creek, Markham Creek, and Fisher Creek are the only named streams in this watershed. Land use in the watershed is dominated by two primary agricultural practices: row cropping and grass pasture. In many cases, these agricultural practices occur adjacent to the stream banks, causing immediate runoff to the stream. This is es­pecially evident during high precipitation or snowmelt events. In upcoming years more residential land use is expected as recent development from the city of Janesville is expanding into the south east corner of the watershed.

Date  2010

Watershed Trout Streams
Watershed Outstanding & Exceptional Resources

Lakes and Impoundments

There are 14 lakes (13 unnamed, 1 named) in the watershed, for a total of 91 lake acres. The named lake is Afton Gravel Pit, which supports a fishery of bass, pike, and pan fish.

Date  2010

Wetland Health

There is little to no data on Bass Creek’s wetlands; however, wetland data does exist for the Rock River Basin (that which Bass Creek is part of). The following information comes from the Rock River Basin: Mapping its Potentially Restorable Wetlands report (2008). Historically, the Rock River Basin had about 632,297 acres of wetlands in presettlement times. Of those, 270,667 acres, or 42.8%, have been lost due to agricultural, residential and transportation development. This coarse analysis shows that 87.6% of the lost wetland acres in the Rock River Basin have some potential to be restored. Poten­tially Restorable Wetlands (PRWs) emerge as areas that have favorable soil conditions, compatible land uses, and are not existing wetlands.

Date  2010

Impaired Waters

The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources (WDNR) placed the entire lengths of Stevens Creek and Markham Creek on the state of Wisconsin’s 2004 303(d) impaired waters list due to degraded habitat caused by excessive sedimentation. Stevens Creek and Markham Creek are not supporting their codified uses. The existing use for both Stevens and Markham Creeks is a warm water forage fish community (WWFF). Biotic integrity scores for fish and macroinvertebrate commu­nities are expected to increase as measures are taken to reduce sedimentation and embeddedness of the substrate in Stevens Creek and Markham Creek.

Date  2010

List of Impaired Waters
Watershed Grants
Grant Details
Urban Nonpoint - Stormwater Planning
Date
9/18/2003
Waters Involved
Rock River
Status
Complete

City Of Beloit: Utility District Evaluation & Implementation: to cost-share @70% analysis, development & implementation of a stormwater management utility district


Grant Details
Urban Nonpoint - Stormwater Planning
Date
1/1/2007
Waters Involved
Unnamed
Status
Complete

Town Of Beloit: Rock Co Towns Joint Planning: To cost-share development of storm water plans for the Rock County towns of Beloit, Janesville, Harmony, Rock & Turtle.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
4/1/2000
Waters Involved
Rock River
Status
Complete

Rock River Coalition, Inc: Corporate Outreach: Forming New Partnerships In The Rock River Basin: The Rock River Colition, Inc. will generate a strategy for developing business and corporate involvement with the Coalition to protect river quality and increase cooperation with businesses and industries. It will include: develop promotional materials for this strategy, develop a business needs assessment survey and a business contact strategy, work with UWEX CNRED staff begin implementing this stategy on a pilot basis.

A full description of the project scope and deliverables is available in the grant application, which is a part of this agreement. The DNR will be provided with both a paper copy and an electronic copy of the final report. Information will be disseminated to the public as described in the grant application.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
10/18/2000
Waters Involved
Rock River
Status
Complete

Rock River Coalition, Inc: Rock River Corporate Outreach: New Partnership Implementation: The Rock River Coalition will implement the business outreach strategic plan that was developed in phase one of this project. Specifically: 1) hire a project coordinator, 2) activate the business outreach plan, 3) develop a Power Point and/or other presentations for businesses and industries, 4) develop a menu of activities for business involvement and protocols for implementing them, 5) contact 20 businesses per month, 6) establish 5, on the ground environmental protection projects with at least one on an ERW or ORW, 7) host roundtables or training workshops for basin businesses and business associations with potential broadcast over local cable channels, 8) increase corporate sponsorship of the Rock River Coalition by 70%.

A full description of the project scope and deliverables is available in the grant application, which is part of this agreement. The DNR will be provided with both a paper copy and an electronic copy of the final report. Information will be disseminated to the public as described in the grant application.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2001
Waters Involved
Rock River
Status
Complete

Rock River Headwaters, Inc: Organization Development & Outreach Coordinator: Rock River Headwaters will increase organizational development along with creating effective community-based regional watershed planning and management. Project deliverables: include a fund raising strategy, a public information and education plan, and a public engagement plan.

A full description of project scope and deliverables is available in the grant application, which is part of this agreement. The DNR will be provided with both a paper copy and an electronic copy of the final report. Information will be disseminated to the public as described in the grant application.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2003
Waters Involved
Rock River
Status
Complete

Rock River Coalition, Inc: Citizen Monitoring: Rock River Coalition will continue the expansion and institutionalization of the Rock River Basin Citizen Monitoring Program so that the program can increase and train the number of individual monitors, schools and youth groups. Project deliverables include the annual 'Confluence 'conference, interenet database with the collect river data, and quality assurance and quality control techniques.

A full description of project scope and deliverables is available in the grant application, which is part of this agreement. The DNR will be provided with both a paper copy and an electronic copy of the final report. Information will be disseminated to the public as described in the grant application.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2003
Waters Involved
Rock River
Status
Complete

Rock River Coalition, Inc: Rock River Basin Shoreline Restoration Project: The Rock River Coalition will provide assistance and direction to local municipalities in order to stabilize and restore 12 critical shoreline areas within the Rock River Basin.. Project deliverables include: restoring a native shoreline to provide a natural habitat for wildlife, controling errosion due to fluctuating water levels, creating a buffer strip along the parkland, education outreach, including local residents with hands on involvement for river protection, creating additional green space, minimizing soil loss, and controling surface water runoff.

A full description of project scope and deliverables is available in the grant application, which is part of this agreement. The DNR will be provided with both a paper copy and an electronic copy of the final report. Information will be disseminated to the public as described in the grant application.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2005
Waters Involved
Rock River
Status
Complete

Rock River Coalition, Inc: Rain Garden In Every Community: We anticipate working primarily in areas where rain garden and storm water education has not yet occurred. Rain gardens will be installed at schools or other community locations in eight basin communities and will be highly visible. Students and community groups will develop the rain gardens. The rain gardens are expected to increase public involvement in local community decision- making by raising awareness of environmental issues facing the Rock River Basin.

A full description of the project goal and objectives are in the grant application, which is a part of this application.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2005
Waters Involved
Rock River
Status
Complete

Rock River Coalition, Inc: River Friendly Cities: The project goal is to improve/protect water quality by promoting urban stormwater management through a program to recognize communities that conduct a stormwater management program that meets performance standards. The objectives are to: organize a partnership of stakeholders; explore what has been and is being done currently to promote urban stormwater management; assess interest and value for developing such a project; and, develop a project proposal and seek funding through grants to implement the program.

A full description of the project goal and objectives are in the grant application, which is a part of the application.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2008
Waters Involved
Rock River
Status
Complete

Rock River Coalition, Inc: Rock River Basin-Finalizing The Water Star Community Program: The Rock River Coalition, Inc will conduct a project to finalize the design and to implement statewide the Water Star Community Program. This incentive-based program will work with municipalities to perserve and improve their local water quality. Project deliverables include 1) use of feedback from pilot communities to develop the final program plan for the Water Star Community program; 2) finalize all incentives as suggested by the pilot communities/steering committee; 3) develop a long-range plan for program implementation; 4) develop and publish a final program manual; 5) promote the Water Star program across the State.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2009
Waters Involved
Rock River
Status
Complete

Rock River Coalition, Inc: Rock River Basin--Beginning Implementation Of The Water Star Community Program: The Rock River Coalition, Inc. will begin statewide implementation of the Water Star Community Program. The goal of this project is to recognize communities that meet performance standards and conduct activities to enhance stormwater management, groundwater protection, habitat protection and human health. Along with a final report, project deliverables include: 1) Conduct Water Star Community presentations to at least 10 groups; 2) improve the web-based application process; and 3) design and produce Water Star Community signs.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2011
Waters Involved
Rock River
Status
Complete

Rock River Coalition, Inc: Rock River/Horicon Marsh Sampling Project Pt. 3: The Rock River Coalition, Inc. will sponsor a River Planning project to collect data and to provide information that demonstrate that the installation of conservation practices in the watershed results in improved water quality. Project deliverables include: 1.) summary of water quality findings, 2.) compare concentration and loads of suspended sediments and nutrients between sites and data collected in 1998-2000. The data that is being collected will be used to compare with previous data. The water quality data, along with future biological data, will be used to determine if the impaired waters have improved and if so to an extent where the water bodies can be removed from the 303d list. 3.) Summary of implemented point and nonpoint practices. The project includes a tracking component using GIS mapping that tracks all practices implemented in the watershed. These maps, along with the data comparison information will show where practices have been installed and whether or not the project has been successful. 4.) The project includes an education effort to inform landowners and other stakeholders that the installation of ag nonpoint practices to reduce nutrient and sediment inputs to the Horicon marsh watershed does improve water quality and the quality of the River. The improved water quality data that is collected will be presented through various meetings and media to show that practices installed were successful.


Monitoring & Projects

Projects including grants, restoration work and studies shown below have occurred in this watershed. Click the links below to read through the text. While these are not an exhaustive list of activities, they provide insight into the management activities happening in this watershed.

Monitoring Studies

The Citizen Lake Monitoring Network, the core of the Wisconsin Lakes Partnership, involves over 1000 citizen vol­unteers statewide. The goals are to collect high quality data, to educate and empower volunteers, and to share this data and knowledge. Volunteers measure water clarity, using the Secchi Disk method, as an indicator of water qual­ity. This information is then used to determine the lakes trophic state. Volunteers may also collect chemistry, tem­perature, and dissolved oxygen data, as well as identify and map plants, watch for the first appearance of Eurasian Water Milfoil near boat landings, or or alert officials about zebra mussel invasions on Wisconsin lakes. Stream water quality monitoring, covering primarily biological, chemical, and habitat related monitoring, has been completed (2006) to determine ambient conditions at “pour point” locations for the south central region watersheds. TMDL monitoring has been conducted and completed on Markham Creek and Stevens Creek. Monitoring on Markham Creek was completed in 2004; monitoring on Stevens Creek was completed in 2006. The WDNR intends to monitor Stevens Creek and Markham Creek based on the rate of implementation of the TMDLs. Monitoring for Total Suspended Solids will continue until it is deemed that the streams have responded to the point where they are meeting their potential uses or until funding for these studies are discontinued. In addi­tion, the streams will be monitored on a five-to six-year interval as part of a baseline monitoring strategy to assess temporary conditions and note trends in overall stream quality. The monitoring will consist of metrics contained in WDNR’s baseline protocol for wadeable streams, such as the Index of Biotic Integrity (IBI), the Hilsenhoff Biotic Index (HBI), the current habitat assessment tool, and sampling of water quality parameters at a subset of sites.

Date  2010

Bass Creek Watershed

Goals

9/21/2010
Increase Conservation Easements for Farmland Preservation a. Increase the awareness of farmland preservation needs through educational programs, partnerships and the development and distribution of educational factsheets. b. Promote current farmland preservation programs and develop a long-range plan to protect prime farmland.
9/21/2010
Improve and Protect Groundwater Quality a. Increase public awareness of groundwater quality b.Increase the use of nutrient management planning through training programs for farmers c.Include well abandonment as part of a groundwater education program
9/21/2010
Improve and Protect Habitat Quality a. Increase awareness of the importance of preservation and restoration of habitat areas, including use of wetlands b.Provide educational programs that promote tree and prairie planting and sustainable woodlands management c. Promote programs related to the restoration of in-stream habitat, stream corridor restoration and the use of buf­fers to improve wildlife habitat. d. Provide informational materials to the public on threatened and endangered species and promote programs for restoring and preserving habitat in critical areas e. Provide informational materials to the public on invasive species f. Provide informational materials to the public on native species of grasses, forbs, shrubs and trees and promote the restoration of native plant and grassland communities. Promote correct placement of communities on the land­scape to improve habitat and travel corridors for wildlife.
9/21/2010
Improve and Protect Surface Water Quality a.Develop and foster partnerships to deliver surface-water related educational programs, including Agricultural and Household Clean Sweep Programs and promoting CREP. b.Implement a nutrient management training program for farmers. c. Develop and conduct educational programs aimed at reducing polluted runoff and sediment delivery to surface waters, including promoting implementation of NR 151 and understanding and using local policies and regulations
9/21/2010
Improve and Protect Soil Quality a. Develop and conduct a soil quality and soil erosion public education program to increase the use of conservation tillage and grassed waterways, and incease implementation of NR 151 and other policies and regulations. b. Reduce soil erosion on construction sites through the development and implementation of a training program on proper installation of conservation practices for prospective homeowners, builders, contractors, and developers c. Promote programs and practices that control soil erosion on stream banks

Priorities

9/21/2010
Priority issues for this watershed include the quantity and quality of agricultural runoff reaching surface waters and groundwater, and its impact on drinking water and surface water quality. Additional issues for this watershed include invasion by non-native invasive species, loss of wetlands and the need for riparian vegetation buffers, runoff from urban areas, and the lack of water quality and biological assessment data.
Watershed Recommendations
Citizen-Based Stream Monitoring
Citizen Stream Monitoring
Date
Status
Collect chemical, physical, and/or biological water quality data to assess the current overall stream health. The data can inform management decisions and may be used to identify impaired waters for biennial lists.
1/1/2012
In Progress
Projects
 
Citizen-Based Stream Monitoring
Citizen Stream Monitoring
Date
Status
Collect chemical, physical, and/or biological water quality data to assess the current overall stream health. The data can inform management decisions and may be used to identify impaired waters for biennial lists.
1/1/2012
In Progress
Projects
 
Citizen-Based Stream Monitoring
Citizen Stream Monitoring
Date
Status
Collect chemical, physical, and/or biological water quality data to assess the current overall stream health. The data can inform management decisions and may be used to identify impaired waters for biennial lists.
1/1/2012
In Progress
Projects
 
Cost-Share Agreement
 
Date
Status
The Environmental Quality Incentive Program (EQIP) is another option available to landowners. EQIP is a fedcost-share program administered by the Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) that provides farmers with technical and financial assistance. Farmers may receive up to seventy five percent reimbursement for installing and implementing runoff management practices. Eligible projects can include: terraces, waterways, diversions, and contour strips to manage agricultural waste, promote stream buffers, and control erosion on agricultural lands.
8/4/2010
Proposed
 
Hire County Aquatic Invasives Coordinator
 
Date
Status
Hire Aquatic Invasives (AIS) County Coordinator - Rock
1/1/2011
Not Proposed
Projects
 
Master Planning
 
Date
Status
Farmers may enroll in the Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) or similar programs to establish vegetated buffers on cropland and marginal pastures. Riparian buffers assist in making CREP a viable program for this impaired stream. A similar program available is the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), which takes highly erodible land out of agricultural use. As of May 2005, 394 acres in the Markham Creek and Stevens Creek watersheds were enrolled in CRP and CREP. Of the 394 enrolled acres, 118 acres are within 20 feet of a stream or major drainage way. Of these, 82 acres are filter strips and the other 36 acres are enrolled as wetland restorations or scrape ponds for wildlife.
8/4/2010
Proposed
 
Monitor Watershed (Status,Sources,Impairments)
 
Date
Status
Watershed Planning
6/30/2009
In Progress
 
Runoff Grant
 
Date
Status
The Rock County LCD may also apply for a Targeted Runoff Management (TRM) grant through WDNR. TRM grants are competitive financial awards to support small-scale, short term projects (24 months) completed by governmental units to reduce runoff pollution. Both urban and agricultural projects can be funded through a TRM grant; however, the grants require a local contribution to the project. The state share is capped at $150,000.
10/5/2010
Proposed
 
TMDL Implementatoin
Stevens Creek &Markham Creek TMDL
Date
Status
To reach the TMDLs in the Stevens Creek and Markham Creek watersheds best management practices such as riparian buffers and conservation tillage are encouraged in agricultural land use settings to reduce loading during high flow events. In addition to the implementation of enforceable non-point source performance standards, there are a number of voluntary programs that will assist in implementing these TMDLs.
8/4/2010
Proposed
 
Water Quality Planning
 
Date
Status
Future enforcement of non-point source performance standards and prohibitions will likely take place in Stevens Creek and Markham Creek watersheds. It is also anticipated that regulatory agricultural and non-agricultural performance standards called for in Wisconsin Statutes will be implemented in the watersheds of impaired waters. Currently, enforcement is based on the opportunity to provide cost-share dollars. If money is offered to landowners violating performance standards, they are obligated to comply. Administrative rules passed by the Natural Resources Board identify that watersheds with impaired waters will have the highest priority for enforcement.
8/4/2010
Proposed
 
Bass Creek WatershedWater Plans and PartnershipsRead the Watershed Plan

A watershed plan has been updated for this watershed in 2010 and is now available for review.

Date  2010

Watershed History Note

The Village of Footville is located in the Bass Creek watershed in Rock County. Ezra Foot, founder of Footville, came to the area as an agent for Eastern land speculators in 1845. A local farmer and school teacher, Julius Gilbert, helped Foot plat the village in 1854 in anticipation of the arrival of the Beloit-Madison Railroad. Because of financial difficulties, the line terminated for several years at Footville, making it the transportation link with area farmers for grain exports to Chicago and Milwaukee. The Madison stage brought travelers going south from Madison, Evansville and Magnolia to the depot, until the rail advanced to Madison in 1864. This transportation link provided the impetus for development of farm related enterprises in Footville, culminating in the growth of the dairy industry from small "cottage industries" in cheese and butter making to the building of the condensery in 1912. A market was created for 300,000 pounds of milk per day for the area farmers. In 1927, the Pet Milk Company purchased the condenser and enlarged the operation to over 100 employees. The plant closed in 1957 and in 1963 the Triangle Conduit & Cable Company purchased the building for truck and rail service. The Footville Bank was constructed in 1909, and was the first bank in Footville. The bank was famous for giving out suckers to all 'good' kids. The first bank robbery occurred in 1965, but the robber was caught in a cornfield after a car chase that ran out of gas. The bank was closed in 1975 after 65 years at the same location and was relocated into a bigger building closer to Hwy 11. The Mid America Bank resides there now and still has a box of suckers for kids of all ages to help themselves. The Old Footville Bank building is now a historical site and is where the historical society is located.

Date  2010