Watershed - Plum and Kankapot Creeks (LF03)
Plum and Kankapot Creeks Watershed

Details

Historical data indicates water quality problems in the Plum Creek Watershed. Problems with low dissolved oxygen, high nutrient levels and sediment levels which were attributed primarily to nonpoint pollution. Poor land practices in the Plum Creek Watershed (84 square miles, 102 square kilometers), cause nonpoint source pollution that degrades water quality in the upper reaches of the Plum Creek. The headwaters are intensively farmed and cropland erosion, streambank pasturing and barnyard runoff are common. The lower reaches have very steep banks which prohibit pasturing and cropping. In 1992 a watershed assessment was conducted by WDNR to determine the impacts of nonpoint source pollution on water quality. A predominately agricultural watershed, the Plum Creek Watershed was ranked "High" for streams. The watershed is now eligible for selection as a priority watershed under the Wisconsin Nonpoint Source Pollution Abatement Program. Refer to the 1994 Plum Creek Watershed Nonpoint Source Assessment Report by Mary Gansberg for more information. There is one municipal point source discharger and five industrial point source dischargers in the Plum Creek Watershed: Holland Town Sanitary District No. 1, Appleton Papers Inc Locksmill, Interlake papers, Kerwin Paper Co. Div. Riverside Corp., White Clover Dairy Co Inc. and White Clover Dairy Inc Sherwood.

Date  1998

Ecological Landscapes for Plum and Kankapot Creeks Watershed

Ecological Landscapes

The Plum and Kankapot Creeks Watershed lies primarily within the Central Lake Michigan Coastal Ecological Landscape which stretches from southern Door County west across Green Bay to the Wolf River drainage, then southward in a narrowing strip along the Lake Michigan shore to central Milwaukee County. Owing to the influence of Lake Michigan in the eastern part of this landscape, summers there are cooler, winters warmer, and precipitation levels greater than at locations farther inland. Dolomites and shales underlie the glacial deposits that blanket virtually all of the Central Lake Michigan Coastal Ecological Landscape. The dolomite Niagara Escarpment is the major bedrock feature, running across the entire landscape from northeast to southwest. Series of dolomite cliffs provide critical habitat for rare terrestrial snails, bats, and specialized plants. The primary glacial landforms are ground moraine, outwash, and lakeplain. The topography is generally rolling where the surface is underlain by ground moraine, variable over areas of outwash, and nearly level where lacustrine deposits are present. Important soils include clays, loams, sands, and gravels. Certain landforms, such as sand spits, clay bluffs, beach and dune complexes, and ridge and swale systems, are associated only with the shorelines of Lake Michigan and Green Bay. Historically, most of this landscape was vegetated with mesic hardwood forest composed primarily of sugar maple, basswood, and beech. Hemlock and white pine were locally important, but hemlock was generally restricted to cool moist sites near Lake Michigan. Areas of poorly drained glacial lakeplain supported wet forests of tamarack, white cedar, black ash, red maple, and elm, while the Wolf and Embarrass Rivers flowed through extensive floodplain forests of silver maple, green ash, and swamp white oak. Emergent marshes and wet meadows were common in and adjacent to lower Green Bay, while Lake Michigan shoreline areas featured beaches, dunes, interdunal wetlands, marshes, and highly diverse ridge and swale vegetation. Small patches of prairie and oak savanna were present in the southwestern portion of this landscape.

Date  2010

Watershed Documents
Watershed Grants
Grant Details
Small Scale Lake Planning
Date
4/1/2011
Waters Involved
Fox River
Status
Complete

Fox Wolf Watershed Alliance: Traveling Education Kiosk: The sponsor will create a traveling educational kiosk designed to be used at Farmer's Markets, conferences, county fairs and other public venues. Booth costs at the Valley Home Builders Association, the WBAY Home and Garden Show and the Brown County Home Builder's Expo are reflected in the request.


Grant Details
Targeted Runoff - Urban Construction
Date
1/1/2001
Waters Involved
Fox River
Status
Complete

City Of Appleton: Red Oak Ravine: construction and easement purchases to install BMPs in Red Oak Ravine


Grant Details
Targeted Runoff - Urban Construction
Date
1/1/2002
Waters Involved
Unnamed
Status
Complete

City Of Kaukauna: Company Woods Drainage Channel: to cost-share @70% construction of a wet pond & streambank stabilization practice in the 1000 Islands Conservancy Area of the Company Woods site


Grant Details
Urban Nonpoint - Stormwater Construction
Date
1/1/2008
Waters Involved
Unnamed
Status
Complete

Village Of Kimberly: Sunset Park Detention Pond: To cost-share construction retrofit of a regional detention pond in Sunset Point Park to assist the Village in meeting the pollutant reduction goals of its Municipal Storm Water permit.


Grant Details
Urban Nonpoint - Stormwater Planning
Date
8/10/2005
Waters Involved
Garners Creek
Status
Cancelled

Village Of Combined Locks: Storm Water Planning: To develop municipal runoff ordinances in compliance with Chapter NR151, map the area's drainage systems, develop a stormwater management plan, provide for public involvement & education, and examine options for dedicated revenue sources.


Grant Details
Urban Nonpoint - Stormwater Planning
Date
8/10/2005
Waters Involved
Kankapot Creek
Status
Complete

Town Of Harrison: Storm Water Planning: To develop municipal runoff ordinances, map the area's drainage systems, develop a stormwater management plan, provide for public involvement & education, and examine options for dedicated revenue sources.


Grant Details
Urban Nonpoint - Stormwater Planning
Date
1/1/2005
Waters Involved
Plum Creek
Status
Complete

Village Of Wrightstown: Stormwater Plan: development of a storm water management plan, to include creation of stormwater, erosion & illicit discharge control ordinances, mapping, and assessment of alternative practice installations.


Grant Details
Urban Nonpoint - Stormwater Planning
Date
1/1/2005
Waters Involved
Unnamed
Status
Complete

Village Of Sherwood: Stormwater Planning Projects: development of a storm water management plan, to include creation of stormwater, erosion & illicit discharge control ordinances, mapping, assessment of alternative practice installations, and creation of a municipal storm water utility.


Grant Details
River Planning Grant
Date
7/1/2004
Waters Involved
Fox River
Status
Complete

Fox Wolf Watershed Alliance: Fox Wolf Water Quality Summit Implementation Project: The Fox Wolf Watershed alliance proposes to implement recommendations from a February 2004 water quality summit. Phase 2 of the project calls for five tasks to be implemented. They are:

1. State of the Basin report to be done by Lawrence University intern to coordinate and condense existing information/reports. The information will be presented in a final document prepared professionally similar to the State of The Bay report for Green Bay.
2. Website update - update the Fox Wolf Alliance website to function as a n information clearinghouse for information produced by this group.
3. Agricultural Meeting and Task Force- the goal is to develop a task force to produce at least one initiative to address phosphorus and sediment loading to the basin from Agricultural sources.
4. Research Coordination - the goal of this task is to expand the existing research workshop. Identify basin research gaps, and identify collaborative research projects.
5. Phosphorus Outreach and Education- the goal of this task is to plan and expand the content and marketing for a Phosphorus Workshop in the basin.


Monitoring & Projects

Projects including grants, restoration work and studies shown below have occurred in this watershed. Click the links below to read through the text. While these are not an exhaustive list of activities, they provide insight into the management activities happening in this watershed.

Grants and Management Projects
Plum and Kankapot Creeks Watershed
Watershed Recommendations
Hire County Aquatic Invasives Coordinator
 
Date
Status
Hire Aquatic Invasives (AIS) County Coordinator - Winnebago
1/1/2011
Not Proposed
Projects
 
Hire County Aquatic Invasives Coordinator
 
Date
Status
Hire Aquatic Invasives (AIS) County Coordinator - Brown
1/1/2011
Not Proposed
Projects
 
Hire County Aquatic Invasives Coordinator
 
Date
Status
Hire Aquatic Invasives (AIS) County Coordinator - Outagamie
1/1/2011
Not Proposed
Projects
 
Monitor Fish Tissue
Confirm FCA: IW listed from pre-year 2000 FCA data
Date
Status
117900 name Lower Fox River (Depere Dam To Middle Appleton Dam) TMDL ID 150 Start Mile 7.39 End Mile 32.18
11/21/2011
Proposed
 
Plum and Kankapot Creeks WatershedWatershed History Note

The land in the vicinity of the Village of Combined Locks in the Plum and Kankapot Creeks watershed was home to Native Americans prior to the arrival of fur traders and missionaries. It was a fertile land covered in forests full of game for hunting and rivers and lakes filled with fish. In the 17th century, the Black Robes, as the Native Americans called the French missionaries, were welcomed into their villages. Eventually, the landmark bay on the south shore of the Fox River beckoned to its first settler and got its first name - Garner's Landing. Roland Garner (or Gardner), according to pioneer records, cleared and worked his farm on the hill in the 1830's and 1840's at the time the French from Canada were establishing homesteads in the present Town of Buchanan. Then 10 German families plus a few bachelors came to the Landing to settle as a group in 1842. The first Hollanders arrived in 1848, brought to the new country by the Reverend Theodore VandenBroek, missionary priest at La Petite Chute (Little Chute). He had worked among the Menominee people since 1836 and returned to his native land to recruit workers for the building of the canals on the river. While in Holland, the priest wrote so eloquently of his wilderness that instead of one boatload of families ready to emigrate he found he had recruited two. The third large group of settlers, most of whom came as canal workers, were the Irish. Some married here and settled down; others sent for the families they had left back east while they worked to earn enough for a homestead and a new start. Together these people of different culture backgrounds worked to build a strong farming community. Today, descendants of these sturdy pioneers still live in the village.

Date  2010