Watershed - Eau Galle River (LC03)
Eau Galle River Watershed

Details

The Eau Galle River watershed is approximately 171,440 acres in size and consists of 519 miles of streams and rivers, 252 acres of lakes and 3,943 acres of wetlands. The watershed is dominated by agriculture (40%), forest (34%) and grassland (23%) and is ranked high for nonpoint source issues affecting streams and groundwater.

Date  1996

Ecological Landscapes for Eau Galle River Watershed

Ecological Landscapes

The Eau Galle River Watershed is located in two Ecological Landscapes: the Western Coolee and Ridges and the Western Prairie. The Western Coulee and Ridges Ecological Landscape in southwestern and west central Wisconsin is characterized by its highly eroded, driftless topography and relatively extensive forested landscape. Soils are silt loams (loess) and sandy loams over sandstone residuum over dolomite. Several large rivers including the Wisconsin, Mississippi, Chippewa, Kickapoo and Black flow through or border the Ecological Landscape. Historical vegetation consisted of southern hardwood forests, oak savanna, scattered prairies, and floodplain forests and marshes along the major rivers. With Euro-American settlement, most of the land on ridgetops and valley bottoms was cleared of oak savanna, prairie, and level forest for agriculture. The steep slopes between valley bottom and ridgetop, unsuitable for raising crops, grew into oak-dominated forests after the ubiquitous presettlement wildfires were suppressed. Current vegetation is a mix of forest (40%), agriculture, and grassland with some wetlands in the river valleys. The primary forest cover is oak-hickory (51%) dominated by oak species and shagbark hickory. Maple-basswood forests (28%), dominated by sugar maple, basswood and red maple, are common in areas that were not subjected to repeated presettlement wildfires. Bottomland hardwoods (10%) are common in the valley bottoms of major rivers and are dominated by silver maple, ashes, elms, cottonwood, and red maple. Relict conifer forests including white pine, hemlock and yellow birch are a rarer natural community in the cooler, steep, north slope microclimates. The Western Prairie Ecological Landscape is located on the far western edge of the state just south of the Tension Zone; it contains the only true representative prairie potholes in the state. It is characterized by its glaciated, rolling topography and a primarily open landscape with rich prairie soils and pothole lakes, ponds, and wet depressions, except for forested areas along the St. Croix River. The climate and growing season are favorable for agricultural crops. Sandstone underlies a mosaic of soils. Silty loams that can be shallow and stony cover most of the area. Alluvial sands and peats are found in stream valleys. Historic vegetation was comprised of dry to mesic prairie grasses in the rolling areas and wet prairies in the broad depressions. Open oak savannas and barrens were found on the hilly topography, with small inclusions of sugar maple-basswood forest in small steep sites. Prairie pothole type wetlands were mainly found in St. Croix and Polk counties. Barrens were found along the river terraces of the St. Croix River. Almost half of the current vegetation is agricultural crops and almost a third of the area is grasslands, with smaller areas of open water, open wetlands, and urban areas. The major forest types are maple-basswood and oak-hickory, with smaller amounts of lowland hardwoods and lowland conifer.

Date  2010

Eau Galle River Watershed At-a-Glance

Impaired Water in Eau Galle River Watershed
River and Stream QualityAll Waters in Watershed

The many trout streams in the Eau Galle River watershed are threatened by the effects of polluted runoff from barnyards and feedlots, streambank grazing, and flooding. Ths combination of pollutants decreases the habitat aquatic organisms need for food and cover. When the streams flood, large amounts of sediment are moved and the high flows scour the streambeds. The change in land use from almost entirely forested to 82 percent agricultural is a key to determining what best management practices would improve the water quality and in-stream habitat. The forested watershed likely had much hgher infiltration rates than the current agricultural uses. Best management practices that reduce the total volume of runoff by increasing infiltration would benefit the streams of this watershed.

Date  1996

Watershed Trout Streams
Watershed Outstanding & Exceptional Resources

Lakes and Impoundments

Impaired Waters

List of Impaired Waters
Watershed Documents
Watershed Grants
Grant Details
Aquatic Invasives Education
Date
2/15/2015
Waters Involved
Chippewa River
Status
Complete

Friends Of Beaver Creek Reserve, Inc.: Lower Chip. Ais Coord.: The Friends of Beaver Creek Reserve proposes to fund positons to coordinate AIS control outreach, training, monitoring and rapid response efforts in the Lower Chippewa River. Major project elements to include: 1) Volunteer training and coordination, 2) AIS monitoring, mapping, and SWIMS data entry 3) Development of AIS control plan, 3) Outreach and events.


Grant Details
Aquatic Invasives Education
Date
2/15/2015
Waters Involved
Dells Pond
Status
Complete

Friends Of Beaver Creek Reserve, Inc.: Lower Chip. Ais Coord.: The Friends of Beaver Creek Reserve proposes to fund positons to coordinate AIS control outreach, training, monitoring and rapid response efforts in the Lower Chippewa River. Major project elements to include: 1) Volunteer training and coordination, 2) AIS monitoring, mapping, and SWIMS data entry 3) Development of AIS control plan, 3) Outreach and events.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
4/1/1999
Waters Involved
Lake Eau Galle
Status
Complete

Dunn County Land Conservation Department: Lake Eau Galle Sedimentation Study: The Dunn Co. Land Conservation Department proposes to study sedimentation in Lake Eau Galle. Major project elements include: 1) sediment survey, 2) sediment core analysis, 3) streambank erosion inventory, and 4) dredging plan design. The Department of Natural Resources will be provided with both paper and electronic copies of the report. Study findings will be shared with the public through local news paper articles and public meetings, and will be available to the public at local government office buildings and the public library.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
10/1/2012
Waters Involved
Lake Eau Galle
Status
Complete

Dunn County: Dunn Shoreland Zone Implementation: Dunn County proposes to inventory riparian property ownership, compliance with county buffer standards, and sites providing public access to Lake Eau Galle, Lake Tainter, the Red Cedar River and unincorporated areas on Lake Menomin. Major project elements to include: a) Inventory of shoreline properties and water access points, and b) education and outreach.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
11/1/1994
Waters Involved
Lake George
Status
Complete

City Of River Falls: Lake George Restoration/Sediment Reduction Feasibility Study: Development of design concepts which equally consider lake restoration (dredging) and stream restoration. Choose a workable design solution that overall best promotes the following criteria: a) stormwater management/sediment reduction, b) improvement offish and wildlife habitat, c) integrates goals of downtown Master Plan, and d) elevates public awareness of riverine ecology and management. Formulate a strategy for successful implementation which included the following: a) build public support throughcitizen input/education, b) build support of elected and appointed officials, c) formulate realistic construction budget for inclusion in capital improvements project list/timing, d) identify sources of funding, public and private, e) formulate a plan forphysical implementation, and f)integrate plan with UW-River Falls and the River Falls Public school systems environmental family science program. The grantee will disseminate information to the public by entire report mailings, public meetings, localnewspaper articles, a comprehensive management plan and TV and/or radio spots. Project results will be reposited at City Hall, City library, and UW-River Fall library.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
10/1/2001
Waters Involved
Lake George
Status
Complete

Pierce County: Watershed Analysis- Eau Galle River Watershed: Pierce County proposes to study the influence of various watershed characteristics (topography, land use/land cover, etc.) on Eau Galle River watershed. Activites to include: 1) hydrologic model of the Eau Galle River watershed, 2) Identification of land use practices and sub-watershed areas that are sources of sediment and plant nutrient loading, 3) Analysis of alternative best management practices and projects. The Department of Natural Resources will be provided with a paper copy and an electronic copy of the final report. Project results will be diseminated to the public through...


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
4/1/2002
Waters Involved
Lake George
Status
Complete

Pierce County: Spring Valley Watershed- Water Quality: Pierce County proposes to continue a study of the influence of various watershed characteristics on Eau Galle River watershed. Project activities for the second phase of this study include continued work on the hydrological model of the Eau Galle River. The Department will be provided with a paper copy and an electronic copy of the final report. Project results will be diseminated to the public as described in the grant application.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
4/1/2003
Waters Involved
Lake George
Status
Complete

Pierce County: Eau Galle River Watershed Analysis - Phase 3: Project will provide funding for watershed modeling and planning study components. This project is Phase III of a four phase project. A progress report from the ACOE to Pierce County LCD describing status of the watershed modeling and planning should be considered the project deliverable.

The DNR will be provided with both a paper copy and an electronic copy of the final report. Information will be disseminated to the public as described in the grant application.


Grant Details
Targeted Runoff - Urban Construction
Date
4/3/2000
Waters Involved
Burkhart Creek
Status
Complete

Village Of Spring Valley: Eau Galle River Trm: provide 70% cost-sharing for construction of streambank protection BMPs


Grant Details
Targeted Runoff - Urban Construction
Date
1/1/2002
Waters Involved
Carr Creek
Status
Complete

Village Of Woodville: Carr Creek Wq Trm: to c-s @70% eligible grantee-installed practices


Grant Details
Urban Nonpoint - Stormwater Planning
Date
1/1/2005
Waters Involved
Carr Creek
Status
Complete

Village Of Woodville: Stormwater Plan & Utility: development of a storm water management plan, to include creation of stormwater, erosion & illicit discharge control ordinances, mapping, assessment of alternative practice installations, and creation of a municipal storm water utility.


Grant Details
River Protection Grant
Date
7/1/2005
Waters Involved
Chippewa River
Status
Complete

Durand Sportsman'S Club: Chippewa Restoration #2: The Durand Sportsman Club proposes to stabilize the stream bank at two sites on the Lower Chippewa River between Ella and Meridean in Dunn and Pepin counties. Major project elements to include: 1) rip rap placement, 2) incorporation of woody structure, 3) seeding and planting of associated upland areas to enhance wildlife habitat. Seeding of upland areas to be done using species from the geographic area as well as with ecotypes from within the region to ensure that intergrity (including genetic) of existing species and habitat is maintained. See Atlas of the WI Prairie and Savanna Flora (Tech. Bulletin No. 191) for geographic location of species. Contact Armund Bartz, 608-785-9019, with questions.


Grant Details
River Protection Grant
Date
7/1/2012
Waters Involved
Chippewa River
Status
Complete

Durand Sportsman'S Club: Chippewa Restore '12: The Durand Sportsmans Club proposes to continue with riverbank restoration on three private properties on the Chippewa River in Pepin County. Project to restore 300 ft. of riverbank on the Polzer property,700 ft. on the Hagness property, and 807 ft. on the Bauer property. Major project elements to include: 1) installation of rip-rap, and 2) re-vegetation of upland banks.


Eau Galle River Watershed
Watershed Recommendations
Hire County Aquatic Invasives Coordinator
 
Date
Status
Hire Aquatic Invasives (AIS) County Coordinator - Pierce
1/1/2011
Not Proposed
Projects
 
Monitor Aquatic Biology
Monitor biology on WBIC: 2055000
Date
Status
Conduct biological (mIBI or fIBI) monitoring on Eau Galle River, WBIC: 2055000, AU:888381
5/21/2016
Proposed
Projects
 
Monitor Fish Tissue
Confirm FCA: IW pre-2000 data
Date
Status
2050000 name Chippewa River TMDL ID 80 Start Mile 20.73 End Mile 37.58
11/21/2011
Proposed
 
Monitor Water Quality or Sediment
Eau Galle River TP
Date
Status
2012 was a drought year and last two years were generally wetter than normal...I'd prefer getting samples during a normal year. AU: 15609; Station ID: 10009391
5/1/2018
Proposed
Projects
 
Monitor Water Quality or Sediment
Knights Creek TP
Date
Status
Category 2. 2018 TP Results: May Exceed. Station: 10028742. Au: 15625.
1/1/2018
Proposed
Projects
 
Monitor Water Quality or Sediment
Eau Galle River TP
Date
Status
Category 2. 2018 TP Results: May Exceed. Station: 483019. AU: 18771.
1/1/2018
Proposed
Projects
 
Monitor Water Quality or Sediment
Eau Galle River TP
Date
Status
Category 3. Limited sampling show concentrations are below the standard. I'd prefer getting samples during a normal year and assess other assessment units at the same time to put the pieces together. 2018 TP Results: May Exceed. Station: 10009391. AU: 15609.
1/1/2018
Proposed
Projects
 
Water Quality Planning
Bear Creek Watershed Planning
Date
Status
The Bear Creek Watershed covers 76.5 square miles in Buffalo and Pepin counties. Bear, Little Bear, and Spring creeks are the three primary sub-watersheds within the Bear Creek Watershed. The watershed drains rolling agricultural and wooded areas with many of the tributaries originating in steep coulees. The watershed also drains one urban area, the City of Durand. All streams within the Bear Creek Watershed drain the eastern slope of the Chippewa River Valley. The Bear Creek Watershed contains typical steep topography characteristic of the driftless or un-glaciated area of the state. Because the most productive and level land is on the valley floor, most farming takes place immediately adjacent to streams. Former prairie and a portion of the forested lands have been converted to agricultural uses. The quality of trout streams in this watershed have improved or degraded as agricultural uses have diminished or increased. Earlier editions of the Lower Chippewa River Water Quality Management Plan indicated the Nelson wastewater treatment plant and Nelson Cheese actory discharged to the Lower Chippewa Basin. Due to a basin oundary change, both are in the Buffalo- Trempealeau River Basin. The majority of the wetlands in the watershed are adjacent to the Chippewa and Mississippi Rivers.
7/1/2010
In Progress
Projects
 
Eau Galle River WatershedWatershed History Note

The Village of Woodville is located in St. Croix County in the Eau Galle River Watershed. As late as 1870, the portion of St. Croix County in the Woodville area was so heavily forested that it was known as the Big Woods. The forests, in conjunction with the west branch of the Eau Galle River, known as Carr Creek, set the stage for lumbering, and the birth of Woodville. The earliest settlers came here as hunters, lumber mill workers and wood choppers. Woodville's first permanent settler was J. M. S. Anderson who arrived in Woodville in 1870 and in 1874 erected a steam saw mill. In 1872, the West Wisconsin Railroad was constructed and later became the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis, and Omaha. A. A. Kelly established a switching station in Woodville and for a time the locality became known as "Kelly's Switch". Anderson also built the first dwelling house and became Woodville's first postmaster in 1875. He kept the mail, which came twice a week, in an old-style milk safe in the center of the room. In 1877, a new mill was built and the company cut up to 36,000 feet of lumber per day. The company store did about $40,000 worth of business a day. The first church was the Methodist Episcopal, built in 1879. In 1907, Woodville had two blacksmith shops, a restaurant, butter maker, butcher, and also a shoemaker. The school then had two years of high school. Woodville was incorporated in 1911. Lights came in 1914 and a water system in 1920.

Date  2010