Watershed - Springbrook Creek (CW21)
Springbrook Creek Watershed

Details

The Springbrook Creek Watershed, 69.8 square miles in size in Marathon and Langlade Counties, has 99.5 stream miles , 65.9 lake acres, and 977.95 wetland acres. This groundwater fed region is rich in springs and natural coldwater fisheries. Portions of the watershed have changed over time due to land uses that have modified the regional hydrography. The watershed is a mix of agriculture (62%) and forest (25%) as the dominant land uses. Spring Brook flows in a generally southwesterly direction to its confluence with the Eau Claire River in Marathon County. Spring Brook Watershed is divided into four smaller drainage areas. With Spring Brook Creek being the only main source of surface water throughout the watershed and almost 50 percent of this creek is classified as ERW trout waters, maintaining a high water quality is very important to this valuable resource. The watershed was ranked per the Nonpoint Source Priority Watershed Selection Criteria. Based on surface and ground water data, the overall ranking is high, establishing a high priority for future grant eligibility through the Nonpoint Source Program. In 1997, a nonpoint source control plan was approved for the Spring Brook Creek Watershed. The anticipated completion date was December 2008 (Tollard, 1997).

Date  2010

Population, Land Use

Agriculture is important to the area economy, as agriculture comprises over 60 percent of the overall land use in the watershed. There are about 51 active farmers in the watershed and about 30 landowners that rent their land to farmers. The number of farms in both Langlade and Marathon counties has decreased steadily since 1980, however, the average farm size has increased. Over the last 20 years, total farmland acreage has decreased by about 7 percent in Langlade County and by 14 percent in Marathon County. There is currently one confined area feeding operation (CAFO) in the watershed. Following an incident in 2005, where manure was spread from this farm on frozen soil and subsequently was washed into Spring Brook, an adequate manure storage facility was installed. Approximately 80% of the manure from this farm is spread onto lands within the Spring Brook Watershed.

Date  2010

Nonpoint and Point Sources

Prior to building the city of Antigo’s Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP), Spring Brook was classified as a non-trout water below the city. Since that time, water quality in Spring Brook has improved dramatically, allowing for the reestablishment of trout in the 12 mile reach below Antigo (Class I). However, a 2.5- mile stretch of the creek near Antigo is still non-trout water. Warmer waters due to Antigo Lake and urban runoff prevent establishment of trout in this stretch. Biotic index sampling conducted in 1987 showed very poor, very poor and good water quality conditions in Spring Brook. Spring Brook also experiences excessive growths of filamentous algae and aquatic plants downstream of Antigo WWTP, indicating nutrient problems. Monitoring in 2009 and 2010 indicated nutrient levels are elevated below the WWTP when compared to background levels upstream. This is believed to accentuate the excessive algae and macrophyte growth found downstream of the discharge. Extreme diurnal dissolved oxygen swings have been recorded downstream, all the wayto the Eau Claire River. In the 1990s, the watershed was ranked per Wisconsin’s DNR Nonpoint Source Priority Watershed selection criteria. Based on surface and groundwater data and land use characteristics, the overall ranking is high, establishing a high priority for future grant eligibility through the DNR Nonpoint Source Program. In 1997, a nonpoint source control plan was approved for the Spring Brook Watershed; the plan completion date was December 2008.

Date  2010

Ecological Landscapes for Springbrook Creek Watershed

Ecological Landscapes

The Springbrook Creek watershed is located primarily in the Forest Transition Ecological Landscape which lies along the northern border of Wisconsin's Tension Zone, through the central and western part of the state, and supports both northern forests and agricultural areas. The central portion of the Forest Transition lies primarily on a glacial till plain deposited by glaciation between 25,000 and 790,000 years ago. The eastern and western portions are on moraines of the Wisconsin glaciation. The growing season in this part of the state is long enough that agriculture is viable, although climatic conditions are not as favorable as in southern Wisconsin. Soils are diverse, ranging from sandy loam to loam or shallow silt loam, and from poorly drained to well drained. The historic vegetation of the Forest Transition was primarily northern hardwood forest. These northern hardwoods were dominated by sugar maple and hemlock, and contained some yellow birch, red pine and white pine. Currently, over 60% of this Ecological Landscape is non-forested. Forested areas consist primarily of northern hardwoods and aspen, with smaller amounts of oak and lowland hardwoods. The eastern portion of the Ecological Landscape differs from the rest of the area in that it remains primarily forested, and includes some ecologically significant areas. Throughout the Ecological Landscape, small areas of conifer swamp are found near the headwaters of streams, and associated with lakes in kettle depressions on moraines. Ground flora show characteristics of both northern and southern Wisconsin, as this Ecological Landscape lies along the Tension Zone.

Date  2010

Hydrologic Features

Spring Brook flows in a generally southwesterly direction to its confluence with the Eau Claire River in Marathon County. The watershed is divided into three sub-watersheds, with Spring Brook being the only source of surface water. Maintaining high water quality is very important since the entire creek is classified as an Exceptional Resource Waters (ERW) and a Class I trout water.

Date  2010

Springbrook Creek Watershed At-a-Glance

Impaired Water in Springbrook Creek Watershed
River and Stream QualityAll Waters in Watershed

Originating approximately three miles northeast of the City of Antigo, Spring Brook is miles long and flows southwesterly through Antigo before joining the Eau Claire River in northeast Marathon County. The stream is intermittent in the headwaters and spring-fed in the Antigo Flats area. There are no perennial feeder streams associated with Spring Brook. Spring Brook is classified as a Class I trout stream for of its miles. Trout waters are located between CTH V and onehalf mile below North Avenue, and from CTH X to the confluence with the Eau Claire River. These stretches of the stream are also listed in NR as Exceptional Resource Waters (ERW). The segment of stream flowing through the City of Antigo, from one-half mile below North Avenue to CTH X lacks quality habitat, experiences warmer water temperatures, and exhibits poor dissolved oxygen conditions. This stretch of stream is currently classified as a warmwater sport and forage fishery with forage minnows being the dominant fish. Stretches of Spring Brook, especially downstream of the City of Antigo, are overrun with infestations of reed canary grass and, to a lesser degree, Japanese knotweed and purple loosestrife. Spring Brook is not reaching is highest potential use due to pollution from nonpoint sources including eroding croplands, fertilizer, herbicide, and pesticide use in the watershed, improperly managed livestock operations, lack of water due to drought, and possibly cumulative impacts of all the high capacity irrigation wells on the agricultural land surrounding the City of Antigo. The headwaters area of Spring Brook watershed has no perennial streams and is instead made up of a network of intermittent drainage ditches. Spring snow melt and rain are efficiently drained from agriculture fields via these ditches to Skinner Dam, which was built in the s to reduce impacts of flooding to the City of Antigo. Floodwaters from spring storm events and snow melt carry sediment and fertilizer from the headwaters area, impacting the rest of Spring Brook. Potato farming and dairy farming are the dominant agricultural uses in this area. Between Skinner Dam and the City of Antigo, in-stream habitat is severely impacted due to heavy runoff deposits of silt due primarily to agricultural practices. In some cases in this area, Spring Brook has been altered to the point that it no longer flows in its original channel. The fairgrounds racetrack discharges fine clay sediment to the stream during spring runoff and summer rain events. Below the WWTP in Antigo, Spring Brook has exhibited higher phosphorus levels than immediately above the treatment plant. Further below the City of Antigo, Spring Brook is wide and shallow in areas due to historic and the present day practice of allowing livestock free access to the stream. A reconnaissance field visit by DNR Water Resources and Remediation and Redevelopment (R&R) Program personnel in the fall of found free petroleum product entering Spring Brook adjacent to the old coal gas plant just downstream from U.S. Highway . In the city of Anitgo, clean-up of contaminated soils is being addressed through the R&R Program.

Date  2010

Watershed Trout Streams
Watershed Outstanding & Exceptional Resources

Lakes and Impoundments

Antigo Lake, the only lake in the watershed is 32 acres in size and is comprised of a series of four interconnected impoundments. Maximum depth is 16 feet, and the average depth is 7 feet. The drainage area of Antigo Lake is approximately 34.3 square miles. The lake supports a limited fishery. Fish species found in order of abundance during a summer 2008 electrofishing survey were: bluegill, black crappie, largemouth bass, white sucker, yellow perch, pumpkinseed, common shiner, northern pike, and golden shiner. Brook trout in limited numbers are likely present at least part of the year. A spot check of dissolved oxygen conditions in the lake during algal blooms show super saturated levels above 20 mg/L at the water’s surface and under 3 mg/L only a few feet below the surface. These dissolved oxygen levels reveal that the summer algal blooms are having adverse chemical effects on the lake, which in turn affects the lake’s fish population. Antigo Lake acts as a sediment settling basin for agricultural and urban runoff. Curly-leaf pondweed and rusty crayfish have been found in Antigo Lake. Curly-leaf pondweed and cattails are managed within Antigo Lake. Antigo Lake offers a diverse recreational resource including boating and fishing, but has a history of water quality problems including algae blooms, and excess levels of sediment, nutrients and organic matter which limit its use.

Date  2010

Wetland Health

Wetland Status Roughly 1% of the current land uses in the watershed are wetlands. Only 71% of the original wetlands are estimated to exist. Of these wetlands, the majority are forested or shrub wetlands. Wetland Condition Little is known about the condition of the remaining wetlands but estimates of reed canary grass infestations, an opportunistic aquatic invasive wetland plant, into different wetland types has been estimated based on satellite imagery. This information shows that reed canary grass dominates 46% of the existing shrub wetlands and 40% of the remaining emergent wetlands. Reed Canary Grass domination inhibits successful establishment of native wetland species. Wetland Restorability Of the 2682 acres of estimated lost wetlands in the watershed, approximately 99% are considered potentially restorable based on modeled data, including soil types, land use and land cover (Chris Smith, DNR, 2009).

Date  2010

Impaired Waters

There are two impaired segments of Spring Brook. Collectivly, these segments run from mile 10.27 to 14.59 - the stretch in the middle of the stream - where there have been hydrologic modifications, excess nutrients, and historic contaminant deposits that have resulted in low dissolved oxygen readings and aquatic toxicity. The quality of the upstream portion is designated an exceptional resource water and Class I stream but it has been degraded.

Date  2010

List of Impaired Waters

Groundwater

Groundwater is the main source of drinking water. Groundwater quality is generally considered good, however groundwater can be susceptible to contamination by human activity. Groundwater is held in thick, permeable layers of soil and rock. The principal aquifer of the Spring Brook Watershed is the sand-gravel aquifer. A few wells reach the deeper Precambrian basement complex, but generally only where the sand and gravel aquifer is very thin or absent, or otherwise, for use as sumps. Wells that reach the deeper complex are generally located where the sand and gravel aquifer is very thin or absent, or otherwise, used as sumps. A sampling of private wells in the watershed found some with elevated nitrate levels. Elevated nitrate has been linked to agricultural practices, septage spreading, and faulty septic systems.

Date  2010

Watershed Grants
Grant Details
Aquatic Invasives Education
Date
4/1/2013
Waters Involved
Antigo Lake (Kellog Pond)
Status
Complete

Antigo Lake District: Antigo Lakes Ais Control & Prevention Project: Phase 1 2013-2016: The Antigo Lakes Inland Lakes Protection & Rehabilitation District is sponsoring a project which focuses on the control and monitoring of the Curly-leaf Pondweed (CLP) infestation within Antigo Lake. Treatment strategies will be implemented over the next two years.

The project includes the following goals: 1) Pretreatment confirmation and refinement Survey (Spring 2013, 2014); 2) Quantitative CLP Monitoring (sub-sample PI survey)(Summer 2013, 2014); 3) Early season AIS survey (2013, 2014); 4) Pre/Post evaluation monitoring (2013, 2014); 5) Treatment letter report and future treatment planning (2013, 2014); 5) Informational meeting (winter 2014).

Project deliverables include: 1) A final report will be completed discussing the results of the surveys and recommended treatment strategies for 2014; 2) Antigo Lake Aquatic Plant Management Plan update.

Specific conditions for this Project: 1) The WDNR will be provided electronic and hard copies of all data and or reports/plans generated as a result of this project; 2) Make sure lake association members are informed about this project; 3) Provide hard copy of point intercept data in proper spreadsheet format.


Grant Details
Aquatic Invasives Education
Date
4/1/2013
Waters Involved
Spring Brook
Status
Complete

Antigo Lake District: Antigo Lakes Ais Control & Prevention Project: Phase 1 2013-2016: The Antigo Lakes Inland Lakes Protection & Rehabilitation District is sponsoring a project which focuses on the control and monitoring of the Curly-leaf Pondweed (CLP) infestation within Antigo Lake. Treatment strategies will be implemented over the next two years.

The project includes the following goals: 1) Pretreatment confirmation and refinement Survey (Spring 2013, 2014); 2) Quantitative CLP Monitoring (sub-sample PI survey)(Summer 2013, 2014); 3) Early season AIS survey (2013, 2014); 4) Pre/Post evaluation monitoring (2013, 2014); 5) Treatment letter report and future treatment planning (2013, 2014); 5) Informational meeting (winter 2014).

Project deliverables include: 1) A final report will be completed discussing the results of the surveys and recommended treatment strategies for 2014; 2) Antigo Lake Aquatic Plant Management Plan update.

Specific conditions for this Project: 1) The WDNR will be provided electronic and hard copies of all data and or reports/plans generated as a result of this project; 2) Make sure lake association members are informed about this project; 3) Provide hard copy of point intercept data in proper spreadsheet format.


Grant Details
Aquatic Invasives Education
Date
5/1/2004
Waters Involved
Unnamed
Status
Complete

Post Lakes P & R District: Aquatic Invasive Education - Langlade Co. Waterways: The Post Lake P&R District, in cooperation with the Langlade County Waterways Association (LCWA) will sponsor an aquatic invasive species education project which will create a flyer as an insert in the local papers that cover Langlade County. This flyer will be given to local lake associations for distribution to their members. Also, the flyer will go in the Shoreline Friends packets. This project is an expansion of a previous purple loosestrife education project, which will now be expanded to include all aquatic invasives. This project also covers the cost of booth rental for county fair and Post Lake Fair. Volunteers will donate their time to man the booths. The project also includes a Langlade County Youth Fair and Adopt-A-Lake programs in the White Lake and Elcho School districts.

A final report shall be provided to the Department at the end of the grant period, which will include copies of the flyer and any adds developed as a part of the project in addition to a summary of all activities accomplished through the project.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
4/1/1998
Waters Involved
Antigo Lake (Kellog Pond)
Status
Complete

Antigo Lake District: Antigo Lake District Water Quality Management Plan: The Antigo Lake District proposes to collect samples of stormwater outfalls under normal and storm water runoff conditions. They will also create maps of stormwater inlets, outlets, and associated drainage areas. Their final plan will include a section on the recommended preventative, remedial, and rehabilitation measures to minimize stormwater impacts, as well as a section focusing strictly on the future growth areas within the district. The Department of Natural Resources will be provided with both a paper copy and an electronic copy of the final report. The project results will be disseminated to the public by a summary reporting mailing, a public meeting, fact sheet distributions, and through various public media.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
4/1/2001
Waters Involved
Antigo Lake (Kellog Pond)
Status
Complete

Antigo Lake District: Antigo Lake District - Fairgrounds Runoff Maint. Plan: The Antigo Lake District will enhance the current stormwater monitoring and management plan by focusing on the county fairgrounds (racetrack) and loading for nearby stormwater collection basins. The project will determine stormwater treatment alternatives to reduce sediment loading into Spring Brook and Antigo Lake from the racetrack.

Deliverables:
1. Detailed data on drainage are of fairgrounds and other contributing basins.
2. Map of all current stormwater systems and summary of how effective they are.
3. A written document outlining recommended measures to solve the sediment loading problem off the fairgrounds including, specific technical designs for recommended method(s), implementation strategy, economic analysis, and cost share programs available.

The Department of Natural Resources will be provided with both a paper copy and an electronic copy of the final report. The project results will be disseminated to the public by newsletter(s), public meeting(s), and local newspaper articles.



Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
4/1/2010
Waters Involved
Antigo Lake (Kellog Pond)
Status
Complete

Antigo Lake District: Antigo Lake Management Planning Project, Phase 1: Antigo Lakes Inland P&R District is sponsoring phased large scale lake planning grants to study Antigo Lake, in Langlade County. The project will focus on developing a Lake Management Plan (LMP) for Antigo Lake.

Phase 1 project activities include: 1) Stakeholder participation \2013 kick-off meeting, stakeholder survey, planning meetings (up to 2), wrap-up meeting, news release(s), and newsletter article; 2) Water quality sampling and analysis (Secchi, P, Chla, DO, temp, N, and Calcium); 3) Shoreline assessment; 4) Watershed assessment and P load modeling.

Project deliverables include: 1) Stakeholder survey, news release(s), and newsletter article; 2) Shoreland and water chemistry data; 3) Watershed maps and modeling data.

Specific conditions for this project: Draft of stakeholder survey needs to be submitted to Lakes Management Coordinator for review and approval before sending to public

WDNR Lakes Management Coordinator will be provided with an electronic (pdf or word) and hard copy of news release(s), newsletter article, stakeholder survey, data from watershed assessment, shoreland assessment, and water quality sampling, all maps from project, and all GIS data.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
4/1/2010
Waters Involved
Antigo Lake (Kellog Pond)
Status
Complete

Antigo Lake District: Antigo Lake Management Planning Project, Phase 2: Antigo Lakes P&R District is sponsoring phased large scale lake planning grants to study Antigo Lake, in Langlade County. The project will focus on developing a Lake Management Plan (LMP) for Antigo Lake.

Phase 2 project activities include: 1) Point-intercept (PI) aquatic plant survey, community mapping and analysis; 2) Curly-leaf pondweed survey; 3) Develop LMP.

Project deliverables include: 1) PI data; 2) Aquatic plant community maps; 3) Two sets of aquatic plant vouchers; 4) LMP.

Specific conditions for this project: LMP needs Dept review and approval

WDNR Lakes Management Coordinator will be provided with an electronic (pdf or word) and hard copy of LMP, data from PI survey, all maps from project, all GIS data, and vouchers.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
4/1/2010
Waters Involved
Spring Brook
Status
Complete

Antigo Lake District: Antigo Lake Management Planning Project, Phase 1: Antigo Lakes Inland P&R District is sponsoring phased large scale lake planning grants to study Antigo Lake, in Langlade County. The project will focus on developing a Lake Management Plan (LMP) for Antigo Lake.

Phase 1 project activities include: 1) Stakeholder participation \2013 kick-off meeting, stakeholder survey, planning meetings (up to 2), wrap-up meeting, news release(s), and newsletter article; 2) Water quality sampling and analysis (Secchi, P, Chla, DO, temp, N, and Calcium); 3) Shoreline assessment; 4) Watershed assessment and P load modeling.

Project deliverables include: 1) Stakeholder survey, news release(s), and newsletter article; 2) Shoreland and water chemistry data; 3) Watershed maps and modeling data.

Specific conditions for this project: Draft of stakeholder survey needs to be submitted to Lakes Management Coordinator for review and approval before sending to public

WDNR Lakes Management Coordinator will be provided with an electronic (pdf or word) and hard copy of news release(s), newsletter article, stakeholder survey, data from watershed assessment, shoreland assessment, and water quality sampling, all maps from project, and all GIS data.


Grant Details
Large Scale Lake Planning
Date
4/1/2010
Waters Involved
Spring Brook
Status
Complete

Antigo Lake District: Antigo Lake Management Planning Project, Phase 2: Antigo Lakes P&R District is sponsoring phased large scale lake planning grants to study Antigo Lake, in Langlade County. The project will focus on developing a Lake Management Plan (LMP) for Antigo Lake.

Phase 2 project activities include: 1) Point-intercept (PI) aquatic plant survey, community mapping and analysis; 2) Curly-leaf pondweed survey; 3) Develop LMP.

Project deliverables include: 1) PI data; 2) Aquatic plant community maps; 3) Two sets of aquatic plant vouchers; 4) LMP.

Specific conditions for this project: LMP needs Dept review and approval

WDNR Lakes Management Coordinator will be provided with an electronic (pdf or word) and hard copy of LMP, data from PI survey, all maps from project, all GIS data, and vouchers.


Monitoring & Projects

Projects including grants, restoration work and studies shown below have occurred in this watershed. Click the links below to read through the text. While these are not an exhaustive list of activities, they provide insight into the management activities happening in this watershed.

Monitoring Studies

Fisheries projects include a wide variety of “baseline” monitoring and targeted fieldwork to gain specific knowledge related to Wisconsin’s fish communities in/on Antigo Lake (Kellog Pond), Spring Brook Aquatic Invasive Species (AIS) Monitoring: In close cooperation with UW Extension and Wisconsin Sea Grant, education efforts focus on working with resource professionals and citizens statewide to teach boaters, anglers, and other water users how to prevent transporting aquatic invasive species when moving their boats. Additional initiatives include monitoring and control programs. Spring Brook Impairment Monitoring 2009: Monitoring was proposed to include water chemistry monitoring at four sites during summer, fall, and winter. Biologists proposed deploying sondes for a month period during the summer months and conducting fish IBI surveys at the same sites.

Date  2010

Grants and Management Projects
Springbrook Creek Watershed

Goals

9/20/2010
Work with landowners and managers to reduce runoff and point sources of agricultural / urban pollutant sources, particularly suspended solids and phosphorus.
9/20/2010
Maintain trout waters, particularly naturally reproducing class I and class II trout streams.
9/20/2010
Maintain quality of Outstanding and Exceptional Waters.
9/20/2010
Identify, restore and protect quality in-stream habitat for fish and other aquatic life, including macroinvertebrates.

Priorities

9/20/2010
Evaluate and restore impaired waters in the watershed if they exist.
9/20/2010
Identify, restore and protect remaining wetlands in the watershed.
9/20/2010
Preserving coldwater fisheries and spawning areas of the watershed, primarily Spring Brook.
9/20/2010
Restore and maintain quality trout waters in the stretch of stream known to be degraded.
Watershed Recommendations
Fish Management, Access
 
Date
Status
DNR Fisheries Management should look into developing some type of restricted harvest regulation so the quality and trophy brook trout fishing is maintained on Spring Brook.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Information and Education
 
Date
Status
Inform the public of habitat loss and the impacts of those losses upon fish and wildlife populations, water quality, flood control and the quality of life.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Information and Education
 
Date
Status
Educate the public on the installation and use of rain gardens and rain barrels.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Information and Education
 
Date
Status
Educate the public concerning AIS and ways to reduce the spread of these via human activities.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Master Planning
 
Date
Status
Land Conservation Department personnel and DNR staff should continue to encourage farmers to implement Best Management Practices for groundwater water quality. These include nutrient management, manure storage facilities, barnyard runoff management, animal lot relocation, animal waste storage abandonment, manure storage facilities, and wetland restoration.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Monitor Targeted Area
 
Date
Status
Stream sediment and water should be collected for bioassessment toxicity testing above and below the old coal gas plant.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Monitor to Evaluate Projects
 
Date
Status
DNR Water Resources and R & R Programs should continue to monitor water quality during the clean-up phase of contaminated soils associated with the old coal gasification plant adjacent to Spring Brook.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Monitor to Evaluate Stream Baseflow
 
Date
Status
Potential impacts of high capacity irrigation wells should be studied to see if their cumulative impact is resulting in lower than normal stream flows.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Monitor with Baseline Survey
 
Date
Status
Sediment monitoring should be conducted in Spring Brook, and tested for Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons, Volatile Organic Compounds and metals.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Natural Areas Protection
 
Date
Status
Encourage sports clubs (e.g. Trout Unlimited) and agricultural producers to work together to plant cover crops on recently harvested potato fields to keep water and wind from moving the soil away and into Spring Brook.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Protect Riparian or Shorelands
 
Date
Status
Educate the public concerning shoreline preservation and restoration.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Restore Riparian Habitat
 
Date
Status
DNR Staff should continue to pursue land acquisition or leases along Spring Brook for streambank protection and habitat improvement.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Restore Wetlands
 
Date
Status
DNR Staff should determine the cause of excessive plant growth (Reed Canary Grass) below Antigo and evaluate control options and conduct dissolved oxygen studies.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Runoff Evaluation
 
Date
Status
Land Conservation Department personnel and DNR staff should continue to encourage farmers to implement soil and water quality conservation practices. These include the installation of grassed waterways and runoff detention ponds in the watershed to reduce flooding potential, erosion, sedimentation, and chemicals from reaching the stream. Stormwater detention basins could be farmed and would help slow runoff to Spring Brook during high runoff events such as spring melt and large rainfall events.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Runoff Grant
 
Date
Status
Spring Brook Watershed should remain a high priority for future grant eligibility under the State Nonpoint Source Pollution Abatement Program.
9/29/2010
Proposed
 
Stormwater Planning, Implementation
 
Date
Status
Educate the public concerning the impacts of stormwater to Antigo Lake and Spring Brook.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Stormwater Planning, Implementation
 
Date
Status
Encourage the use of rain gardens and rain barrels in the City of Antigo.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Urban Growth Planning
 
Date
Status
Encourage the fairgrounds racetrack managers to install stormwater control measures such as detention ponds.
8/18/2010
Proposed
 
Springbrook Creek WatershedWater Plans and PartnershipsRead the Watershed Plan

Watershed Planning in Springbrook Creek (CW21) was conducted in 2010.

Date  2011

Watershed History Note

The Spring Brook Creek watershed, located in Langlade and Marathon counties includes the City of Antigo.The name "Antigo" comes from the Chippewa Indian name for the river that flows through the area, "Nequi-Antigo-sebi" meaning "spring river" or "evergreen". The city was founded in 1878 by 1878 by Civil War veterans Francis Deleglise and George Eckart. The log cabin in which Deleglise lived is preserved and on display at the Langlade County Museum. A street in Antigo also bears his name. The city gained its charter in 1883. In the early part of the 1900s, Antigo was best known for its saw mills. At the turn of the millennium, the city's economy had a balance of industry and agriculture. High on the list were potatoes, dairy products, fur, shoes, fertilizer, steel and aluminum products, along with the lumber and wood product industries established in the earlier years.

Date  2010