Watershed - Trappers and Pine Creeks (BR12)
Trappers and Pine Creeks Watershed

Details

Trappers and Pine Creeks watershed is located in southeastern Taylor County, with a small section in Clark County. Nineteen miles of the Black River flow through this watershed. Woodlands and wetlands, with substantial areas of agricultural land concentrated in the southeastern two-thirds of the watershed, comprise the major land uses. No significant population centers exist in this watershed, hence no permitted point source discharges. A significant portion of the watershed is within the Chequamegon National Forest. Most of the watershed contains ground moraine, where soils are silt loams underlain by stony loams. A band along the watershed's northwest edge contains end moraine, where soils are stony sandy loams and loams. Most of the watershed's lakes are found in this area.

Date  1999

Nonpoint and Point Sources

Pine Creek and Trappers Creek have been identified as high priority candidates for nonpoint source pollution control efforts. Streambank pasturing and barnyard runoff have been identified as the primary causes of reduced in-stream habitat and water quality degradation.

Date  1999

Ecological Landscapes for Trappers and Pine Creeks Watershed

Ecological Landscapes

The Trapper and Pine Creeks Watershed is located primarily in the Forest Transition Ecological Landscape which lies along the northern border of Wisconsin's Tension Zone, through the central and western part of the state, and supports both northern forests and agricultural areas. The central portion of the Forest Transition lies primarily on a glacial till plain deposited by glaciation between 25,000 and 790,000 years ago. The eastern and western portions are on moraines of the Wisconsin glaciation. The growing season in this part of the state is long enough that agriculture is viable, although climatic conditions are not as favorable as in southern Wisconsin. Soils are diverse, ranging from sandy loam to loam or shallow silt loam, and from poorly drained to well drained. The historic vegetation of the Forest Transition was primarily northern hardwood forest. These northern hardwoods were dominated by sugar maple and hemlock, and contained some yellow birch, red pine and white pine. Currently, over 60% of this Ecological Landscape is non-forested. Forested areas consist primarily of northern hardwoods and aspen, with smaller amounts of oak and lowland hardwoods. The eastern portion of the Ecological Landscape differs from the rest of the area in that it remains primarily forested, and includes some ecologically significant areas. Throughout the Ecological Landscape, small areas of conifer swamp are found near the headwaters of streams, and associated with lakes in kettle depressions on moraines. Ground flora show characteristics of both northern and southern Wisconsin, as this Ecological Landscape lies along the Tension Zone.

Date  2010

Wildlife and Habitat

Aquatic dependent species of concern have been documented in this watershed. Management decisions should consider potential affects to these species. Other species may be present but not yet documented.

Date  1999

Monitoring & Projects

Projects including grants, restoration work and studies shown below have occurred in this watershed. Click the links below to read through the text. While these are not an exhaustive list of activities, they provide insight into the management activities happening in this watershed.

Trappers and Pine Creeks Watershed
Watershed Recommendations
Hire County Aquatic Invasives Coordinator
 
Date
Status
Hire Aquatic Invasives (AIS) County Coordinator - Clark
1/1/2011
Not Proposed
Projects
 
Monitor Aquatic Biology
Monitor biology on WBIC: 5008959
Date
Status
Conduct biological (mIBI or fIBI) monitoring on Unnamed, WBIC: 5008959, AU:3994532
5/21/2016
Proposed
 
Monitor Aquatic Biology
Monitor biology on WBIC: 1761000
Date
Status
Conduct biological (mIBI or fIBI) monitoring on Paradise Creek, WBIC: 1761000, AU:14298
5/21/2016
Proposed
 
Monitor Fish Tissue
Confirm FCA: IW listed from pre-year 2000 FCA data
Date
Status
10/28/2011
Proposed
 
Monitor and/or Protect Groundwater, Sourcewater
 
Date
Status
WDNR staff should continue to encourage communities to develop wellhead protection plans in the Watershed and the whole basin.
7/1/2010
Proposed
Projects
 
Trappers and Pine Creeks WatershedWatershed History Note

The Trappers and Pine Creeks Watershed has substantial woodland and wetlands and no significant population centers. There are numerous gravel pits throughout the watershed, a gift left behind from the last glaciation. This area would have been a quiet, perhaps lonely place to work, for those men who surveyed Clark and Taylor counties in 1936 and 1939 respectively, as part of The Wisconsin Land Economic Inventory (popularly known as the "Bordner Survey," after its director, John Bordner). This work officially began in 1929 and its mission was to document the current and potential use of land in all parts of the state of Wisconsin so that abandoned farms, cutover forests, and other "idle" land could be resettled, reforested, or otherwise put to productive use. Today, these maps document the history of the Wisconsin landscape, particularly during the Depression era. The Inventory operated as part of the Wisconsin Department of Agriculture and Markets until 1937, when it was placed under the direction of the State Planning Board. In 1941, it went back to the Department of Agriculture. It officially ended in 1947, though some maps continued to be updated by the Department of Agriculture after that time. Field workers, mostly trained forestry graduates, crossed the land at intervals of one-half mile. One of the goals was to set foot in every "forty" (40-acre quarter-quarter section) in the state. Hand-drawn field maps were produced for sections or groups of sections in a township. These maps, along with aerial photography and information from the original land survey of Wisconsin, provided the raw material for the published maps. The field maps are now housed in the Wisconsin Historical Society Archives Division. Each county was mapped separately, with a separate sheet for each township as defined by the Public Land Survey System (for example "T.5N. R.6E.," for "Township 5 North, Range 6 East"). The corresponding civil town or towns with jurisdiction over the area are usually indicated at the top of the map. Often, but not always, the date of the map sheet and the initials of the cartographer are given on the upper right corner of the map.

Date  2010