Western District Follow Up Monitoring for Impairment Decisions 2015

Purpose

Follow Up monitoring at sites where our data suggests that there might be an impairment but we do not have the minimum data requirements to make an impairment decisions based on WisCALM guidance.

Outcome

Impairment decisions on selected streams and lakes for Wisconsin's Impaired Waters list, 303(d).

QA Measures

Run Project Summary Report

TMDL/303d Projects
Identify Impaired Waters
West_FollowUp_2015
2015
Complete
 
Reports and Documents
Many of Wisconsin’s water quality standards require multiple visits to make an assessment decision. Every year, several stream sites are monitored and the field data collected during each visit are used to “flag” problem waters. In the next year, follow up monitoring is carried out on the “flagged” waters where the data suggest there is an impairment, but there are insufficient data to make that determination based on the State’s minimum data requirements. In 2015, Water Action Volunteers stream monitors who live nearby the recommended follow up sites were asked to assist in the monitoring process by collecting water samples to be analyzed for total phosphorus at the Wisconsin State Lab of Hygiene.
Many of Wisconsin’s water quality standards require multiple visits to make an assessment decision. Every year, several stream sites are monitored and the field data collected during each visit are used to “flag” problem waters. In the next year, follow up monitoring is carried out on the “flagged” waters where the data suggest there is an impairment, but there are insufficient data to make that determination based on the State’s minimum data requirements. In 2015, Water Action Volunteers stream monitors who live nearby the recommended follow up sites were asked to assist in the monitoring process by collecting water samples to be analyzed for total phosphorus at the Wisconsin State Lab of Hygiene.
Many of Wisconsin’s water quality standards require multiple visits to make an assessment decision. Every year, several stream sites are monitored and the field data collected during each visit are used to “flag” problem waters. In the next year, follow up monitoring is carried out on the “flagged” waters where the data suggest there is an impairment, but there are insufficient data to make that determination based on the State’s minimum data requirements. In 2015, Water Action Volunteers stream monitors who live nearby the recommended follow up sites were asked to assist in the monitoring process by collecting water samples to be analyzed for total phosphorus at the Wisconsin State Lab of Hygiene.
Many of Wisconsin’s water quality standards require multiple visits to make an assessment decision. Every year, several stream sites are monitored and the field data collected during each visit are used to “flag” problem waters. In the next year, follow up monitoring is carried out on the “flagged” waters where the data suggest there is an impairment, but there are insufficient data to make that determination based on the State’s minimum data requirements. In 2015, Water Action Volunteers stream monitors who live nearby the recommended follow up sites were asked to assist in the monitoring process by collecting water samples to be analyzed for total phosphorus at the Wisconsin State Lab of Hygiene.
Many of Wisconsin’s water quality standards require multiple visits to make an assessment decision. Every year, several stream sites are monitored and the field data collected during each visit are used to “flag” problem waters. In the next year, follow up monitoring is carried out on the “flagged” waters where the data suggest there is an impairment, but there are insufficient data to make that determination based on the State’s minimum data requirements. In 2015, Water Action Volunteers stream monitors who live nearby the recommended follow up sites were asked to assist in the monitoring process by collecting water samples to be analyzed for total phosphorus at the Wisconsin State Lab of Hygiene.
Many of Wisconsin’s water quality standards require multiple visits to make an assessment decision. Every year, several stream sites are monitored and the field data collected during each visit are used to “flag” problem waters. In the next year, follow up monitoring is carried out on the “flagged” waters where the data suggest there is an impairment, but there are insufficient data to make that determination based on the State’s minimum data requirements. In 2015, Water Action Volunteers stream monitors who live nearby the recommended follow up sites were asked to assist in the monitoring process by collecting water samples to be analyzed for total phosphorus at the Wisconsin State Lab of Hygiene.
Many of Wisconsin’s water quality standards require multiple visits to make an assessment decision. Every year, several stream sites are monitored and the field data collected during each visit are used to “flag” problem waters. In the next year, follow up monitoring is carried out on the “flagged” waters where the data suggest there is an impairment, but there are insufficient data to make that determination based on the State’s minimum data requirements. In 2015, Water Action Volunteers stream monitors who live nearby the recommended follow up sites were asked to assist in the monitoring process by collecting water samples to be analyzed for total phosphorus at the Wisconsin State Lab of Hygiene.