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Wildlife and forestry research staff

Wildlife and forestry research staff are located at two research stations: Science Operations Center-Madison; and the Northern Forest Research Unit, Rhinelander.

Dustin Bronson, Forest Research Ecologist


Dustin Bronson

Education:

B.S., Zoology, Michigan State University, 2004

Ph.D., Forest Ecology; Minor: Soil Science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2008

Areas of Interest, Expertise:

Effects of climatic variation on forest ecosystem structure and function.

Current or Recent Research Projects:

Carbon sequestration; Managed old-growth silvicultural study (MOSS); Managing for old-growth attributes: Harvesting productivity and costs associated with restorative silvicultural practices; An ecological assessment of varying deer densities and forest habitat

Selected Publications:

Bond-Lamberty, B., D.R. Bronson, E. Bladyka, and S.T. Gower. 2011. A comparison of trenched plot techniques for partitioning soil respiration. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 43(10):2108-2114.

Van Herk, I.G., S.T. Gower, D.R. Bronson, and M. Tanner. 2011. Effects of climate warming on canopy water dynamics of a boreal black spruce plantation. Canadian Journal of Forest Research 41(2):217-227.

Bronson, D.R., and S.T. Gower. 2010. Ecosystem warming does not affect photosynthesis or aboveground autotrophic respiration for boreal black spruce. Tree Physiology 30(4):441-449.

Bronson, D.R., S.T. Gower, M. Tanner M, and I. VanHerk. 2009. Effects of ecosystem warming on boreal black spruce bud burst and shoot growth. Global Change Biology 15(6):1534-1543.

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Brian Dhuey, Wildlife Surveys Database Manager


Brian Dhuey

Education:

B.S., Biology, Ecology Emphasis, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, 1987

Areas of Interest, Expertise:

Wildlife harvest, permits, season lengths, and population information for most hunted and trapped species in Wisconsin. Citizen monitoring, trail camera based abundance indices for wildlife, web based data collection and survey techniques.

Current or Recent Research Projects:

Wildlife surveys and databases

Selected Publications:

Van Deelen, T.R., B.J. Dhuey, C.N. Jacques, K.R. McCaffery, R.E. Rolley, and K. Warnke. 2010. Effects of earn-a-buck and special antlerless-only seasons of Wisconsin's deer harvests. Journal of Wildlife Management 74:1693-1700.

Gilbert, J., J. Sausen, and B.J. Dhuey. 2010. Wisconsin Elk Habitat Suitability Analysis. Research Report 191 PUB-SS-591 2010, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison.

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Ron Gatti, Waterfowl Biologist


Ron Gatti

Education:

B.S., Fisheries and Wildlife Biology, Iowa State University, 1974

M.S., Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1979

Areas of Interest, Expertise:

Duck biology, ecology, and population management. Geese, pheasants, nongame birds in forests and grasslands, watershed modeling, GIS, and radio telemetry

Current or Recent Research Projects:

Evaluation of landscape management in the Stewardship Fund's Habitat Restoration Area Program; Evaluating factors limiting Blue-winged Teal production and survival in the Great Lakes region

Selected Publications:

Soulliere, G.J., B.A. Potter, J.M. Coluccy, R.C. Gatti, C.L. Roy, D.R. Luukkonen, P.W. Brown., and M.W. Eichholz. 2007. Upper Mississippi River and Great Lakes Region Joint Venture Waterfowl Habitat Conservation Strategy. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Yerkes, T., R. Paige, R. Macleod, L. Armstrong, G. Soulliere, and R. Gatti. 2007. Predicted distribution and characteristics of wetlands used by mallard pairs in five Great Lakes states. American Midland Naturalist 157:356-364.

Richardson, M.S., and R.C. Gatti. 1999. Prioritizing wetland restoration activity within a Wisconsin watershed using GIS modeling. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 54:537-542.

Gatti, R.C., D.W. Sample, E.J. Barth, A. Crossley, S.W. Miller, and T.L. Peterson. 1994. Integrating grassland bird habitat restoration in Wisconsin using GIS habitat modeling. Transactions of the North American Wildlife and Natural Resources Conference 59:309-316.

Gatti, R.C. 1992. Impacts of timber cutting on breeding birds in southern Wisconsin woodlots. Research Report 154, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison.

Gatti, R.C., J.O. Evrard, and W.J. Vander Zouwen. 1992. Electric fencing for duck and pheasant production in Wisconsin. Technical Bulletin 176, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison.

Gatti, R.C., R.T. Dumke, and C.M. Pils. 1989. Habitat use and movements of female ring-necked pheasants during fall and winter. Journal of Wildlife Management 53:462-475.

Gatti, R.C. 1988. Trends in Wisconsin's spring duck surveys. Findings 10, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison.

Gatti, R.C. 1987. Duck production: the Wisconsin picture. Findings 1, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison.

Wheeler, W.E., R.C. Gatti, and G.A. Bartelt. 1984. Duck breeding ecology and harvest characteristics on Grand River Marsh Wildlife Area. Technical Bulletin 145, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison.

Gatti, R.C. 1983. Incubation weight loss in the mallard. Canadian Journal of Zoology 61:565-569.

Gatti, R.C. 1983. Spring and summer age separation techniques for the mallard. Journal of Wildlife Management 47:1054-62.

Gatti, R.C. 1981. A comparison of two hand-reared mallard release methods. Wildlife Society Bulletin 9:37-43.

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Richard Henderson, Plant Ecologist


Richard Henderson

Education:

B.A., Biological Aspects of Conservation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1977

M.S., Landscape Architecture: Natural Resources, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1981

Areas of Interest, Expertise:

Ecology of prairies, oak savannas, oak woodlands, sedge meadows, and purple loosestrife; and fire ecology and effects

Current or Recent Research Projects:

Ecology and control of purple loosestrife; Oak ecosystem management; Distribution and status in WI of Silphium gall-wasps and associated insects; Management impacts on and species composition of prairie invertebrate communities

Selected Publications:

Henderson, R.A., and S.B. Sauer. 2012. Silphium Gall Wasps: Little-Known Prairie Specialists. Pages 116-121 in D. Williams, B. Butler, and D. Smith, editors. Proceedings of the 22nd North American Prairie Conference, Cedar Falls, IA.

Henderson, R.A. 2012. Rosinweed Gall Wasp Response to Fire. Pp. 110-115 in D. Williams, B. Butler, and D. Smith, editors. Proceedings of the 22nd North American Prairie Conference, Cedar Falls, IA.

Henderson, R.A. 2011. Olson Oak Woods SNA - Can oak woodlands survive? DNR Wildlifer (December issue), DNR Bureau of Wildlife Management, Madison.

Henderson, R.A. 2010. Influence of Patch Size, Isolation, and Fire History on Hopper (Homoptera: Auchenorrhyncha) Communities of eight Wisconsin Prairie Remnants. Research Report 189, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison.

Rogers, D., T.P. Rooney, and R.A. Henderson. 2008. From the prairie-forest mosaic to the forest: dynamics of southern Wisconsin Woodlands. Pages 91-101 in D.W. Waller and T.P. Rooney, editors. The Vanishing Present: Wisconsin's changing lands, waters, and wildlife. University of Chicago Press, IL.

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Scott Hull, Upland Research Scientist


Scott Hull

Education:

B.S., Wildlife Management, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, 1991

M.S., Biology, Kansas State University, 1993

Ph.D., Zoology, The Ohio State University, 2002

Areas of Interest, Expertise:

Upland/Grassland wildlife management, wildlife habitat relationships, endangered resources management, bioenergy impacts on wildlife, farm-bill policy and conservation implications

Current or Recent Research Projects:

Analysis and implementation of population surveys and strategies for ring-necked pheasants at multiple scales in Wisconsin; Evaluating the impact of disease, habitat management treatments, dispersal barriers and genetic diversity and inbreeding on Sharp-tailed grouse populations in the Northwest Sands Ecological Landscape; Wisconsin sustainable planting and harvesting guidelines for nonforest biomass; An evaluation of the translocation of greater prairie-chickens from Minnesota to Central Wisconsin

Selected Publications:

Ventura, S., S.D. Hull, R. Jackson, G. Radloff, D.W. Sample, S. Walling, and C. Williams. 2012. Guidelines for sustainable planting and harvest of nonforest biomass in Wisconsin. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 67(1):17A-20A.

Fandel, S., and S.D. Hull. 2011. Wisconsin Sharp-tailed Grouse: A Comprehensive Management and Conservation Strategy. Final Report to the Natural Resources Board, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison.

Hull, S.D., D.W. Sample, D. Drake, S. Fandel, L. Kardash, O. Ledee and S. Schwab. 2011. The Wisconsin Greater Prairie-Chicken Program: Integrating Research, Management, and Community Outreach in the 21st Century. Passenger Pigeon 173:89-99.

Reetz, M., S.D. Hull, S. Fandel, and R.S. Lutz. 2011. Northwest Sands Habitat Corridor Plan. Final Report, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Madison.

Hull, S.D., C. Bleser, A. Crossley, R. Jackson, E. Lobner, L. Paine, G. Radloff, D.W. Sample, J. Vandenbrook, S. Ventura, S. Walling, J. Widholm, and C. Williams. 2010. Wisconsin Sustainable Planting and Harvesting Guidelines for Nonforest Biomass. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection, and UW-Madison.

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Tricia Knoot, Forest Research Sociologist/Economist


Tricia Knoot

Education:

B.A., Zoology and Biological Aspects of Conservation,

University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1997

M.S., Ecology & Evolutionary Biology (emphasis in Wildlife Ecology),

Iowa State University, 2004

Ph.D., Forestry, Iowa State University, 2008

Areas of Interest, Expertise:

Human dimensions of natural resources, social and economic survey design and analysis, forest and wildlife ecology, landscape ecology, and GIS

Current or Recent Research Projects:

Managing for old-growth attributes: harvesting productivity and costs of restorative silvicultural practices; Oak regeneration and policy: a multi-state investigation of the Driftless Area; Building social networks to capture synergies in wood-based energy production and invasive pest mitigation; University of Iowa Biomass Partnership Project; Farmer capacity to mitigate and adapt to climate change; and Impact of social network structure on land management decisions and environmental outcomes.

Selected Publications:

Kittredge, D.B., M. Rickenbach, T. Knoot, E. Snellings, and A. Erazo. It's the network: How personal connections shaped decisions about private forest use. (In Revision: Northern Journal of Applied Forestry).

Knoot, T.G., and L.B. Best. 2011. A multiscale approach to understanding snake use of conservation buffer strips in an agricultural landscape. Herpetological Conservation & Biology 6(2):191-201.

Knoot, T.G., and M. Rickenbach. 2011. Best management practices and timber harvesting: The role of interpersonal networks in shaping landowner decisions. Scandinavian Journal of Forest Research 26:171-182.

Knoot, T.G. 2011. Book Review: Conservation psychology: Understanding and promoting human care for nature. Landscape Ecology 26(2):297-299.

Knoot, T.G., L.A. Schulte, J.C. Tyndall, and B.J. Palik. 2010. The state of the system and steps toward resilience of disturbance-dependent oak forests. Ecology and Society 15(4): 5.

Knoot, T.G., L.A. Schulte, and M. Rickenbach. 2010. Oak conservation and restoration on private forestlands: Negotiating a social-ecological landscape. Environmental Management 45(1): 155-164.

Knoot, T.G., L.A. Schulte, and B. Palik. Winter 2007-08. The potential loss of oak: A legacy and treasure of the Driftless Area landscape. BetterFORESTS Magazine Vol. IX, No.2:16-17, 19.

Knoot, T.G. 2009. Book Review: A love of the land, selected writings of John Fraser Hart, edited by J.C. Hudson. Landscape Ecology 24(10):1421-1423.

Knoot, T.G., L.A. Schulte, N. Grudens-Schuck, and M. Rickenbach. 2009. The changing social landscape in the Midwest: A boon for forestry and bust for oak? Journal of Forestry 107(5):260-266.

Knoot, T.G., L.B. Best, W. Hohman, and L. Owens. 2006. Grassland bird and snake use of Iowa grassed waterways is influenced by site and landscape characteristics. NRCS, Technical Note 190-60.

Knoot, T.G., N. Grudens-Schuck, and L.A. Schulte. 2006. Watershed learning activity: Coming to terms with geographic scale. Journal of Extension [On-line], 44(3).

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Karl Martin, Scientist and Chief


Karl Martin

Education:

B.S., Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1991

M.S., Wildlife Science, Oregon State University, 1994

Ph.D., Forest Science, Oregon State University, 1998

Areas of Interest, Expertise:

Forest and wildlife management, wildlife habitat relationships, silviculture, and endangered resources management

Current or Recent Research Projects:

An assessment of the vulnerability and adaptation strategies of Wisconsin's wildlife to climate change; An environmental and economic assessment of forest biomass harvesting in Wisconsin; Managed old-growth silvicultural study (MOSS); Managing for old-growth attributes: Harvesting productivity and costs associated with restorative silvicultural practices; Responses of avian communities to management for old-growth characteristics; Spruce grouse habitat use in Wisconsin; Evaluation of marten translocation into North-Central Wisconsin; An ecological assessment of varying deer densities and forest habitat; Habitat selection of flying squirrels in managed old-growth forests; Interspecific habitat selection of Golden-winged Warblers and Blue-winged Warblers in northern and central Wisconsin; Estimating survival and cause-specific mortality of adult male white-tailed deer in Wisconsin; Impact of predation, winter weather, and habitat on white-tailed deer fawn recruitment in Wisconsin

Selected Publications:

Rittenhouse, T.A.G., D.M. MacFarland, K.J. Martin, and T.R. Van Deelen. 2012. Downed wood associated with roundwood harvest, whole-tree harvest, and unharvested stands of aspen in Wisconsin. Forest Ecology and Management 266:239-245.

Steinhoff, S.G., T.R. Van Deelen, K.J. Martin, D.M. MacFarland, and K.R. Witkowski. 2012. Nesting patterns of southern flying squirrels in managed northern hardwoods. Journal of Mammalogy 93(2):532-539.

Jacques, C.N., T.R. Van Deelen, W.H. Hall, Jr., K.J. Martin, and K.C. VerCauteren. 2011. Evaluating how hunters see and react to telemetry collars on white-tailed deer. Journal of Wildlife Management 75:221-231.

LeDee, O.E., W. Karasov, K.J. Martin, M.W. Meyer, C.A. Ribic, and T.R. Van Deelen. 2011. Envisioning the future of wildlife in a changing climate: collaborative learning for adaptation. Wildlife Society Bulletin 35:508-513.

Martin, K.J., R.S. Lutz, and M.L. Worland. 2007. Golden-winged warbler habitat use and abundance in Northern Wisconsin. The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 119(4):523-532.

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Michael Meyer, Wildlife Toxicologist


Michael Meyer

Education:

B.S., Biology, University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, 1978

M.S., Animal Sciences, Texas A&M University, 1982

Ph.D., Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1989

Areas of Interest, Expertise:

Impacts of contaminant exposure on Wisconsin wildlife populations, impacts of development on northern lakes wildlife populations, climate change impacts on wildlife and habitat.

Current or Recent Research Projects:

An assessment of the vulnerability and adaptation strategies of Wisconsin's wildlife to climate change; Ashland/Chequamegon Bay Shoreland Restoration Project 2010-2012; Assessing the potential population effects of Botulism E toxin and Gulf oil exposure on migrating Wisconsin waterbirds; Develop Wisconsin Wildlife Mercury monitoring plan and promote Wisconsin as a National Mercury Monitoring site; Evaluate the impact of legacy polychlorinated bioaccumulating toxic substances (PCBs, DDE, PBDE, PFOS, PFOA) on Wisconsin's Great Lakes bald eagle population - Wisconsin Bald Eagle Biosentinel Project; Evaluating the risk to native fisheries of the use of liquid herbicides (2,4-D) to control Eurasian Watermilfoil in Wisconsin lakes; Potential effects of climate change on inland glacial lakes and implications for lake-dependent biota in Wisconsin; Measure the value of wildlife habitat restoration on northern Wisconsin Lakes: The Wisconsin Shoreland Restoration Project; Assess the impact of mercury exposure on Wisconsin's Common Loon population; Assessing the population effects of lead fishing tackle on fish-eating wildlife in Wisconsin; The Wisconsin Lakes and Wildlife Citizen Science Project

Selected Publications:

Custer, T.W., C.M. Custer, W.E. Thogmartin, P.M. Dummer, R. Rossmann, K.P. Kenow, and M.W. Meyer. 2012. Mercury and other element exposure in tree swallows nesting at low pH and neutral pH lakes in northern Wisconsin USA. Environmental Pollution 163:68-76.

Haskell, D., D. Flaspohler, C. Webster, and M.W. Meyer. 2012. Variation in soil temperature, moisture, and plant growth with the addition of downed woody material on lakeshore restoration sites. Restoration Ecology 20:113-121.

Evers, D.C., K.A. Williams, M.W. Meyer, A.M. Scheuhammer, N. Schoch, A.T. Gilbert, L. Siegel, R.J. Taylor, R. Poppenga, and C.R. Perkins. 2011. Spatial gradients of methylmercury for breeding common loons in the Laurentian Great Lakes region. Ecotoxicology 20:1609-1625.

Kenow, K.P., M.W. Meyer, R. Rossman, A. Gendron-Fitzpatrick, and B. Gray. 2011. Effects of injected methylmercury on the hatching of common loon (Gavia immer) eggs. Ecotoxicology 20:1684-1693.

LeDee, O.E., W. Karasov, K.J. Martin, M.W. Meyer, C.A. Ribic, and T.R. Van Deelen. 2011. Envisioning the future of wildlife in a changing climate: collaborative learning for adaptation. Wildlife Society Bulletin 35:508-513.

Meyer, M.W., P. Rasmussen, C. Watras, K. Kenow, and B. Fevold. 2011. Bi-phasic trends in mercury concentrations in blood of Wisconsin common loons during 1992-2010. Ecotoxicology 20:1659-1668.

Dykstra, C., M.W. Meyer, W. Route, and P. Rasmussen. 2010. Contaminant Concentrations in Bald Eagles Nesting on Lake Superior, the Upper Mississippi River, and the St. Croix River. Journal of Great Lakes Research 36:561-569.

Kenow, K.P., R.K. Hines, M.W. Meyer, S.A. Suarez, and B.R. Gray. 2010. Effects of methylmercury exposure on the behavior of captive-reared Common Loon (Gavia immer) chicks. Ecotoxicology 19:933-944.

Grear, J.S., M.W. Meyer, J.H. Cooley, A. Kuhn, W. Piper, K. Taylor, K. Kenow, M. Mitro, H. Vogel, and D. Nacci. 2009. Population Growth and Demography of a Long-lived Piscivorous Bird in Lakes of the Northern United States. Journal of Wildlife Management (73) 1108-1113.

Kenow, K.P., J. Wilson, and M.W. Meyer. 2009. Techniques for capturing Common Loons during pre-nesting and nesting periods. Journal of Field Ornithology 80(4):427-432.

Burgess, N.M., and M.W. Meyer. 2008. Methylmercury exposure associated with reduced productivity in common loons. Ecotoxicology 17(2):83-91.

Kenow, K.P., D. Hoffman, R.K. Hines, and M.W. Meyer. 2008. Effects of methylmercury exposure on gluthathione metabolism and oxidative stress in common loons. Environmental Pollution 156:732-738.

Mitro, M.G., D.C. Evers, M.W. Meyer, and W.H. Piper. 2008. Mercury and Common Loon survival rates in Wisconsin and New England. Journal of Wildlife Management 72(3):665-673.

Fournier, F., W.H. Karasov, K.P. Kenow, and M.W. Meyer. 2007. Growth and energy requirements of captive-reared common loon chicks (Gavia immer). The Auk 124(4):1158-1167.

Karasov, W.H., K.P. Kenow, M.W. Meyer, and F. Fournier. 2007. Bioenergetic and pharmacokinetic model for exposure of common loon chicks to methylmercury. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 26:677-685.

Kenow, K.P., K.A. Grasman, R.K. Hines, M.W. Meyer, A. Gendron-Fitzpatrick, M. Spalding, and B.R. Gray. 2007. Effects of methylmercury exposure on the immune function of juvenile common loons. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 26:1460-1469.

Kenow, K.P., M.W. Meyer, R.K. Hines, and W.H. Karasov. 2007. Distribution and accumulation of mercury in tissues and organs of captive-reared common loon (Gavia immer) chicks. Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry 26(5):1047-1055.

Pollentier, C.D., K.P. Kenow, and M.W. Meyer. 2007. Common loon eggshell thickness and egg volume vary with acidity of nest lake in northern Wisconsin. Waterbirds 30(3):367-374.

Scheuhammer, A.M., M.W. Meyer, M.B. Sandheinrich, and M.W. Murray. 2007. Effects of Environmental Methylmercury on the Health of Wild Birds, Mammals, and Fish. Ambios 36(1):12-18.

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Mike Mossman, Forest Community Ecologist


Mike Mossman

Education:

B.S., Biology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1976

M.S., Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1984

Areas of Interest, Expertise:

Effects of land use on bird, amphibian, and small mammal populations; history of Wisconsin landscapes and wildlife populations

Current or Recent Research Projects:

Comparison of old-growth and managed forest communities; Effects of houses and roads on abundance and productivity of breeding forest birds in the Baraboo Hills; Developing a system for adaptive management on the Leopold-Pine Island Important Bird Area; Developing and piloting a long-term monitoring protocol for breeding forest and barrens birds on the Lower Wisconsin State Riverway, Wisconsin; Characterizing Cerulean Warbler distribution and habitat in the Lower Wisconsin State Riverway; Evaluating the prevalence of tiger salamander neoteny and its significance to conservation; Monitoring small mammal response to barrens management

Selected Publications:

Matteson, S.W., M.J. Mossman, and D.A. Shealer. 2012. Population Decline of Black Terns in Wisconsin: a 30-year Perspective Waterbirds 35:185-193.

Swenson, S., Y. Steele, and M. Mossman. 2010. A big vision for a broad landscape. Wisconsin Natural Resources Magazine June 2010.

Sample, D.W., and M.J. Mossman. 2008. Two centuries of changes in grassland bird populations and their habitats in Wisconsin. Pages 301-329 in D.W. Waller and T.P. Rooney, editors. The Vanishing Present: Wisconsin's changing lands, waters, and wildlife. University of Chicago Press, IL.

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Robert Rolley, Wildlife Population Ecologist


Robert Rolley

Education:

B.S., Wildlife and Fisheries Biology, University of California-Davis, 1977

M.S., Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1979

Ph.D., Wildlife Ecology, Oklahoma State University, 1983

Areas of Interest, Expertise:

Wildlife population dynamics, monitoring wildlife population trends, effect of harvest on wildlife populations, modeling population response to management strategies, viability and management of small populations, Chronic Wasting Disease management

Current or Recent Research Projects:

Relationships of deer ecology, disease ecology, and hunter behavior to manage chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Wisconsin; An evaluation of the usefulness of deer-vehicle collision data as indices to deer population abundance

Selected Publications:

Rolley, R.E. 2012. Wisconsin Checklist Project: 1982-2010. Passenger Pigeon 74:9-25.

Storm, D.J., M.D. Samuel, T.R. Van Deelen, K.D. Malcolm, R.E. Rolley, N.A. Frost, D.P. Bates, and B.J. Richards. 2011. Comparison of visual-based helicopter and fixed-wing forward-looking infrared surveys for counting white-tailed deer. Wildlife Biology 17(4):431-440.

Van Deelen, T.R., B.J. Dhuey, C.N. Jacques, K.R. McCaffery, R.E. Rolley, and K. Warnke. 2010. Effects of earn-a-buck and special antlerless-only seasons of Wisconsin's deer harvests. Journal of Wildlife Management 74:1693-1700.

Joly, D.O., M.D. Samuel, J.A. Langenberg, R.E. Rolley, and D.P. Keane. 2009. Surveillance to detect chronic wasting disease in Wisconsin white-tailed deer. Journal of Wildlife Diseases 45:989-997.

Osnas, E.E., D.M. Heisey, R.E. Rolley, and M.D. Samuel. 2009. Spatial and temporal patterns of an emerging epidemic: fine scale mapping of a wildlife epidemic in Wisconsin. Ecological Applications 19:1311-1322.

Wasserberg, G., E.E. Osnas, R.E. Rolley, and M.D. Samuel. 2009. Host culling as an adaptive management tool for chronic wasting disease - a modeling study. Journal of Applied Ecology 46:457-466.

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David Sample, Grassland Community Ecologist


David Sample

Education:

B.A., Philosophy, Bowdoin College, 1978

M.S., Land Resources, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1989

Areas of Interest, Expertise:

Birds and other vertebrates of grasslands and savannas: community ecology, habitat preferences, and impacts of habitat management and land use changes; ecology of the American Badger; grassland habitat management on public and private lands - including the production of biomass energy crops; population monitoring; grassland and agricultural ecosystems research.

Current or Recent Research Projects:

Impacts of wooded fencerow removal on bird density and nest productivity in cool season idle grasslands; Evaluation of the Wisconsin Grassland Bird Conservation Area concept; American Badger genetics, population size, distribution, and ecology in Wisconsin; Grassland bird density and nest productivity in potential warm season grass bioenergy crops in southern Wisconsin; A comparison of the relative abundance of Eastern and Western Meadowlarks in southern Wisconsin in 1952-53 and 2003; Grassland birds in Dane County, Wisconsin: 48 years of changes in rural land use and bird populations; Impacts of non-forest biomass production on wildlife in Wisconsin; An assessment of the vulnerability and adaptation strategies of Wisconsin's wildlife to climate change

Selected Publications:

Ribic, C.A., M.J. Guzy, T.R. Anderson, D.W. Sample, and J.L. Knack. 2012. Bird productivity and nest predation in agricultural grasslands. Pages 119-134 in C.A. Ribic, F.R. Thompson, and P.J. Pietz, editors. Video surveillance of nesting birds. University of California Press, Berkeley.

Ventura, S., S. Hull, R. Jackson, G. Radloff, D. Sample, S. Walling, and C. Williams. 2012. Guidelines for sustainable planting and harvest of nonforest biomass in Wisconsin. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 67:17A-20A.

Hull, S.D., D.W. Sample, D. Drake, S. Fandel, L. Kardash, O. Ledee, and S. Schwab. 2011. The Wisconsin Greater Prairie-Chicken Program: Integrating Research, Management, and Community Outreach in the 21st Century. Passenger Pigeon 173:89-99.

Hull, S.D., C. Bleser, A. Crossley, R. Jackson, E. Lobner, L. Paine, G. Radloff, D.W. Sample, J. Vandenbrook, S. Ventura, S. Walling, J. Widholm, and C. Williams. 2010. Wisconsin Sustainable Planting and Harvesting Guidelines for Nonforest Biomass. Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection, and UW-Madison.

Ribic, C.A., M.J. Guzy, and D.W. Sample. 2009. Grassland bird use of remnant prairie and Conservation Reserve Program fields in an agricultural landscape in Wisconsin. American Midland Naturalist 161:110-122.

Ribic, C.A., R.R. Koford, J.R. Herkert, D.J. Johnson, N.D. Niemuth, D.E. Naugle, K.K. Bakker, D.W. Sample, and R.B. Renfrew. 2009. Area sensitivity in North American grassland birds: Patterns and processes. The Auk 126(2):233-244.

Sample, D.W., and M.J. Mossman. 2008. Two centuries of changes in grassland bird populations and their habitats in Wisconsin. Pages 301-329 in D.W. Waller and T.P. Rooney, editors. The Vanishing Present: Wisconsin's changing lands, waters, and wildlife. University of Chicago Press Chicago IL.

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Dan Storm, Ungulate Research Ecologist


Dan Storm

Education:

B.S., Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences, South Dakota State University, 2002

M.S., Zoology, Southern Illinois University Carbondale, 2005

Ph.D., Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2011

Areas of Interest, Expertise:

Ungulate ecology and management, ecology and management of wildlife diseases, wildlife population monitoring.

Current or Recent Research Projects:

Estimating survival and cause-specific mortality of adult male white-tailed deer in Wisconsin; Impact of predation, winter weather, and habitat on white-tailed deer fawn recruitment in Wisconsin; Evaluation of Wisconsin's deer population monitoring and management system; An evaluation of the usefulness of deer-vehicle collision data as indices to deer population abundance; Relationships of deer ecology, disease ecology, and hunter behavior to manage chronic wasting disease (CWD) in Wisconsin.

Selected Publications:

Storm, D.J., M.D. Samuel, R.E. Rolley, P. Shelton, N.S. Keuler, B.J. Richards, and T.R. Van Deelen. 2013. Deer density and disease prevalence influence transmission of chronic wasting disease in white-tailed deer. Ecosphere 4(1):10.

Anderson, C.W., C.K. Nielsen, D.J. Storm, and E.M. Schauber. 2011. Modeling habitat use of deer in an exurban landscape. Wildlife Society Bulletin 35:235-242.

Storm, D.J., M.D. Samuel, T.R. Van Deelen, K.D. Malcolm, R.E. Rolley, N.A. Frost, D.P. Bates, and B.J. Richards. 2011. Comparison of visual-based helicopter and fixed-wing forward-looking infrared surveys for counting white-tailed deer. Wildlife Biology 17(4):431-440.

Schauber, E.M., D.J. Storm, and C.K. Nielson. 2007. Effects of joint space use and group membership on contact rates among white-tailed deer. Journal of Wildlife Management 71:155-163.

Storm, D.J., C.K. Nielson, E.M. Schauber, and A. Woolf. 2007. Space use and survival of white-tailed deer in an exurban landscape. Journal of Wildlife Management 71:1170-1176.

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Last revised: Monday May 05 2014