Find
a Wisconsin state park, forest, recreation area or trail.
Camping opportunities
in state parks and forests.
How to buy
a vehicle admission sticker or state trail pass.
Get Outdoors!
to attend a nature program or event with family and friends.
Contact information
For information, contact:
Richard Bong State Recreation Area
26313 Burlington Rd.
Kansasville, WI 53139
262-878-5600
Trail information line
For current trail availability, call:
262-878-5600

Richard Bong State Recreation Area Trail descriptions

Richard Bong State Recreation Area is open year-round and has over 41 miles of trails for hiking, mountain biking, cross-country skiing, horseback riding, snowshoeing and ATV and dirt bike riding.

ATVs Off-highway motorcycles All-terrain vehicle (ATV) and dirt bike trails

Motorcycle rider
A dirt bike rider ready to go.
DNR Photo

There are seven miles of ATV trails and 10 miles of dirt bike trails at the property. Availability of the trails is determined on a daily basis. Always call 262-878-5600 before you come to ride. The message is changed daily. If weather or trail conditions warrant, the trails may be closed during the day and the telephone message changed.

ATV/Dirt bike loops 1 and 2 open at 9 a.m. Loop 3 never opens before noon. All loops close at sunset. In March and April, the ATV/dirt bike trails are closed.

State trail pass is required for anyone riding a motorcycle or dirt bike ages 16 and older.

Hiking Visitor center nature trail (0.7 miles)

This self-guided nature trail is a limestone-surfaced trail. It can be walked in about 15-30 minutes. The trail is almost completely in the open grasslands and goes through a restored prairie. There is a small oak woodlot. This is a great place to see bobolinks in summer. A boardwalk overlooks beautiful Wolf Lake where you can spot migrating and resident waterfowl.

Hiking Vista nature trail (1.0 miles)

Enjoy its peacefulness of this less-used, self-guided nature trail. It can be walked in about 60-90 minutes. The trail is closed in winter. To get to the trail, park at the Vista parking lot off County Highway B. The trail enters a beautiful hardwood forest and goes past a small pond. This is an excellent birding area for woodland species. The trail ends at a shelter where there are vault toilets and a hand pump.

Hiking Biking Cross-country skiing Snowshoeing Trails north of Highway 142

You may hike, ski or bike (non-motorized bikes) on these northern trails. Bike riders 16 years of age and older need a state trail pass. Dogs are allowed on a leash eight feet or less.  When trails are snow covered, dogs are only allowed on the service roads and the portion of the Red Trail north of Highway BB (ask for “A Guide for You and Your Dog” for rules). Ski trails are not groomed. When ski tracks are present, please do not walk on them.

  • Gray Trail (1.7 miles): The Gray Trail is relatively flat with no steep grades. Crossing Highway 142, the trail passes a nice pond to the west before heading through a semi-wooded area. At the turnaround point, the trail turns south through a heavily wooded area then turns east again to complete the loop and rejoin the initial trail section leading back to the parking lot.
  • Yellow Trail (4.4 miles): The Yellow Trail is a generally level to moderately rolling trail traversing a nice mixture of grassland, woodland and wetland. This is a good trail for birding. The trail crosses a paved road at the north and south ends of the loop. The raised ridge portion of the trail was built as the entrance road to the planned Bong Air Force Base. The trail exits on the west side of the ridge via stairs.
  • Orange Trail (6.4 miles): The Orange Trail crosses Highway BB twice as well as a county road at its northern end. At the first crossing, a pit toilet, hand pump and picnic tables offer a shaded rest stop in a hardwood forest. This trail provides benches that overlook wetlands and it winds through grassland punctuated with scattered brush.  There are wooded areas as well. This trail gets very wet in the spring.
  • Red Trail (8.3 miles): The park's longest trail touches on many vegetative types.  On its far north end, the trail gives a nice overview of what much of the park’s topography looked like before the landscape was altered by the Air Force. After the trail leaves the west junction of the Red and Orange loops, it passes through some nice wetland areas before turning east toward the parking lot.  The northern-most portion is the best place in the park to spot bluebirds.

Hiking Cross-country skiing Snowshoeing Trails south of Highway 142

You may only hike or ski on these southern trails, no bikes are allowed. Dogs are allowed on a leash eight feet or less. When trails are snow covered, dogs are only allowed on the service roads and the portion of the Red Trail north of Highway BB (ask for “A Guide for You and Your Dog” for rules).  Ski trails are not groomed.  When ski tracks are present, please do not walk on them.

  • Green Trail (1.8 miles): The Green Trail is entirely north of Wolf Lake.  A boardwalk between two small ponds is at the start of the trail, a good place to look for waterfowl. This trail travels through a beautiful restored prairie and a small woodlot with good spring wildflowers.  One of the finest overviews of Wolf Lake exists on the return part of the loop, just past the turnoff for the Blue Trail.
  • Blue Trail (4.2 miles): The Blue Trail is one of the nicest trails, it takes you through prairie and woodland, past wetlands and around Wolf Lake. The trail crosses the dam (near Highway 75) that impounds Wolf Lake. Look here for recent beaver activity. The trail just south of the dam dips rather steeply towards the south shore of the lake.  This is an incredible place for spring wildflowers. The trail enters grassland after leaving the shore, skirting several small ponds before crossing the paved access road to the beach. Rest rooms, water and a playground are available at the beach.

Horeback Riding Horse trails

Horseback riding in Winter
Horseback riding along the trails in winter.
Photo by Janet Hermann

Richard Bong State Recreation Area has 13 miles of horse trails. You can get to those trails within the park from Parking Lot J. You must possess a valid state trail pass, which you can purchase at the park. If you bring your horse in a trailer or truck, you also will need a state park vehicle admission sticker.

The horse trails are usually open year-round, but may be closed in the spring when it is very wet. It's best to call before coming at that time of the year. Richard Bong Recreation Area and nearby stables do not rent horses, so you must bring your own horse. Please ride responsibly to not degrade the trails. You are required to take any droppings and hay with you from the parking lots when you leave so the natural beauty of the park is not compromised.

Snowmobiling Snowmobile connector trail

Snowmobilers must have a park admission sticker on their parked vehicle and may park and unload in the unloading area near the shelter at Parking Lot E. Snowmobiles in the property are restricted to the connector trail that leads to Kenosha County trails. Non-resident snowmobiles must be registered in Wisconsin or have annual trail stickers.

Last revised: Monday September 16 2013