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Read
what's new in our current regional forest health updates.
Watch
how to identify and control invasive forest plants.
Learn
about gypsy moth and other spring leaf-eating caterpillars.
Contact information
DNR forest health staff

Suppression program quarantines and spray programs

Wisconsin has two different gypsy moth spray programs, each with different goals and operating procedures. These two programs are run by two different state agencies.

Gypsy Moth quarantined counties featured in red

Gypsy Moth quarantined counties featured in red.

Which program serves your county?

DATCP - Slow The Spread Program (western/unshaded/white)

In non-quarantined counties (white, or unshaded on the map), gypsy moth is still very rare and it would be unusual for this pest to be a problem. The Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection (DATCP) runs Wisconsin’s Slow The Spread (STS) Program [exit DNR] and works in these areas to keep this invasive pest from settling in and spreading.

  • The goal of DATCP’s STS Program is to attack isolated, small populations of gypsy moth--west of the area where the pest is well settled--to try to reduce the rate of this pest’s spread to new areas.
  • DATCP chooses the locations of their treatment areas (also called spray blocks) by closely monitoring gypsy moth populations west of Wisconsin’s quarantined counties. Where the data show that gypsy moth is present in isolated, small populations, DATCP will spray to slow the spread of this pest.
  • DATCP’s STS Program does not take requests from landowners or municipalities for spraying.

DNR - Suppression Spray Program (eastern/shaded/red)

If your property is in one of the quarantined counties (shaded red on the map), gypsy moths could be abundant enough to cause defoliation in your area. The DNR's Suppression Spray Program partners with each county to serve these areas.

  • Both programs use naturally occurring soil bacteria, Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (or Btk) sprayed from the air.
  • On sites with endangered species that would be affected by Btk, other gypsy moth specific treatments are used by both programs.
  • To reduce expenses, the programs share the same aerial spray contractor.

Similarities between programs

  • Both programs use naturally occurring soil bacteria, Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki (or Btk) applied by aerial spray.
  • On sites with endangered species that would be affected by Btk, other gypsy moth specific treatments are used by both programs.
  • To reduce expenses, both programs share the same aerial spray contractor.
Last revised: Thursday April 13 2017