LRP - Licenses

LRP - Regulations

LRP - Permits

Recreation - Statewide

Recreation - Trapping

Recreation - Fishing

Recreation - Hunting

Env. Protection - Management

Env. Protection - Emergency

Env. Protection - Resources

To sign up for updates or to access your subscriber preferences, please enter your contact information below.



 
Share your observations

Share your observations of plants or non-game animals with the Natural Heritage Inventory.

Rare animals
Find rare and non-game animals.
Rare plants
Learn about plants on the Natural Heritage Working List.
Rare lichens
Discover Wisconsin's lichens.
Natural communities
Explore Wisconsin's natural communities.
Other features
Discover unique resources.
Eagle license plate

Help care for rare plants and animals by ordering an Endangered Resources plate.

Contact information
For information on Wisconsin's rare animals, contact:
Rich Staffen
Conservation Biologist
608-266-4340

Wing Snaggletooth (Gastrocopta procera)


Overview

Overview

Wing Snaggletooth (Gastrocopta procera) State Threatened, these terrestrial snails are distinguished by a pupa-shaped shell and several to many "teeth" or folds within the aperture. Shell size is approximately 2.2-3mm long. The somewhat glossy shell is cinnamon-brown in contrast to others of the genus which are white or transparent. This snail is a calciphile and occurs on hill or "goat" prairies with southern or western exposures in western Wisconsin. Populations may exist in an area of only a few square meters. The animals probably prefer to live under organic debris.

State status

Status and Natural Heritage Inventory documented occurrences in Wisconsin

The table below provides information about the protected status - both state and federal - and the rank (S and G Ranks) for Wing Snaggletooth (Gastrocopta procera). See the Working List Key for more information about abbreviations. Counties shaded blue have documented occurrences for this species in the Wisconsin Natural Heritage Inventory database. The map is provided as a general reference of where occurrences of this species meet NHI data standards and is not meant as a comprehensive map of all observations.

Note: Species recently added to the NHI Working List may temporarily have blank occurrence maps.


Documented locations of Gastrocopta procera in the Natural Heritage Inventory Database as of July 2015.
Summary Information
State StatusTHR
Federal Status in Wisconsinnone
State RankS3
Global RankG5
Tracked by NHIY
WWAP SGCN

Species guidance


Note: a species guidance document is not available at this time. Information below was compiled from publication PUB-ER-085-99 (now out-of-print).

Identification: Several species of snaggletooth snails occur in Wisconsin. They are distinguished by a pupa-shaped shell and several to many "teeth" or folds within the aperture. The lip of the rounded aperture of G. procera is heavily callused within and the 5 folds, of which the upper is bifed (two-pronged), are prominent but not nearly filling the aperture. The somewhat glossy shell is cinnamon-brown in contrast to others of the genus which are white or transparent. The shell is marked by lightly impressed striate lines, has five to six whorls with sutures that are noticeably deep, and measures less than 1/8th inch (2.5 mm) in length.

Habitat: This snail is a calciphile and occurs on hill or "goat" prairies with southern or western exposures in western Wisconsin. Populations may exist in an area of only a few square meters. The animals probably prefer to live under organic debris. In states to the south, the species inhabits woodland areas as well, but is restricted in Wisconsin to open sites, which warm early enough in the spring to provide a growth season of at least 160 frost-free days, typical of the western Wisconsin hill prairies and glades.

State Distribution: Occurs in Buffalo, Crawford, Grant, La Crosse, Pierce and Trempealeau and Vernon Counties of Wisconsin.

Management Guidelines: Prairie burn management, which removes the thatch layer, will cause snail mortality. However, closure of the open prairie habitat by invasion of woody plants will eventually result in the loss of many species of the grassland community including this snail. Brush cutting and direct herbicide applications on basal bark and stumps are useful in occupied sites. Heavy grazing is detrimental to habitat and snail populations. Where burning is necessary, use long rotations and multiple units of snail habitat.

Other resources

Links to additional Wing Snaggletooth information

Other links related to aquatic and terrestrial snails

Photos/Video

Photos


Wing Snaggletooth

Chicago Field Museum Specimen. Marks are mm.

Photo by Terrell Hyde and W.A. Smith, WDNR.


Last revised: Thursday, May 04, 2017