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Wellhead protection program Management actions

A sound plan has a to do list that identifies a list of priority measures. The plan can be updated as actions are completed. Adopting a wellhead protection ordinance is the most fundamental protective action but it's just one of many possible measures. Select measures that your community is most likely to carry out.

Lake Michigan


Feedlots and manure management

Educate the public about feedlots and manure management.

  • Contact feedlot owners within the wellhead protection (WHP) area to personally talk with them about their feedlot operations.
  • Encourage feedlot owners within the WHP area to attend workshops and seminars on proper design and operation of feedlots.
  • Co-sponsor, with other units of government, workshops or seminars for feedlot operators in WHP areas.
  • Provide schedules of existing workshops and seminars available through counties, soil and water conservation districts, UW-Extension Service, Natural Resources Conservation Service and others to feedlot operators.
  • Provide cost-share assistance for workshop registrations.
  • Sponsor special events, such as a welcome to wellhead protection, and invite all interested audiences.
  • Work with a well-operated feedlot to host an open house for other feedlot operators, allowing feedlot operators to learn from each other.
  • Offer field days or farm tours on feedlot operation and manure application.
  • Encourage WHP area feedlot operators to attend existing programs.
  • Distribute a packet of printed material discussing feedlot design, operation and maintenance to all feedlots within the WHP area.
  • Make lists of locally available videos available to feedlot operators.
  • Arrange to purchase or copy videos related to feedlot operations and manure management and distribute to feedlot operators.
  • Consider developing a newsletter specifically for landowners in the WHP area, which could highlight a variety of issues including feedlots and manure management.
  • Provide articles to existing newsletters that are read by many landowners in the WHP area.

Provide the public services related to feedlots and manure management.

  • Assist in ensuring that new feedlots are designed and operated properly.
  • Act as an information and referral service and provide lists of feedlot design services available.
  • Arrange for design assistance from private consultants, soil and water conservation districts or Natural Resources Conservation Service staff for feedlots in the WHP area.
  • Arrange for periodic technical assistance visits for feedlots using below-ground manure storage systems.
  • Arrange for county, soil and water conservation districts or Natural Resources Conservation Service staff to provide audits and to assist in correcting any identified deficiencies.
  • Encourage proper manure management within WHP areas to prevent groundwater contamination.
  • Make information on manure testing services available to feedlot operators.
  • Arrange for and provide manure testing services to feedlots in the WHP areas at little or no cost.
  • Provide instruction on calibrating manure spreaders and arrange to have any necessary equipment accessible.
  • Assist feedlot operators and landowners in gaining access to and using manure application planning (MAP) software in WHP areas to prevent groundwater degradation from manure application.
  • Map through GIS existing manure application sites and their scheduled rotation to assist the landowner in meeting the application plan design for a specific feedlot operation.
  • Act as an information/referral resource to existing sources of grants and loans.
  • Actively seek funding for the community (e.g., apply for funding for feedlot upgrades area wide).
  • Create a city-owned fund for cost shares or loans.
  • Cooperate on private/public initiatives for fundraising.
Hazardous waste and household hazardous waste

Educate the public about hazardous waste and household hazardous waste.

  • Sponsor or participate in luncheon meetings for business people.
  • Sponsor or co-sponsor a booth at community fairs and festivals.
  • Work with a hazardous waste generator to host an open house to provide ideas for other local generators.
  • Work with county staff to offer tours of the county’s household hazardous waste facility.
  • Mail or drop off training and workshop schedules to hazardous waste generators.
  • Provide a reduction in utility bills to hazardous waste generators which receive training.
  • Provide scholarships for those generators which attend training.
  • Establish a city-sponsored recognition program for hazardous waste generators which attend training.
  • Require city staff to attend hazardous waste education.
  • Use personal visits to reach hazardous waste generators and households on hazardous waste issues.
  • Use direct mail and passive distribution methods to reach waste generators and households on hazardous waste issues through information packets.
  • Make videos available locally for hazardous waste generators and households.
  • Work with local cable access stations to develop a video about their wellhead protection (WHP) program.
  • Provide school programs on household hazardous waste.
  • Work with counties in designing school programs on household hazardous waste.
  • Work with technical colleges and arrange speakers on hazardous waste issues appropriate to the students.
  • Provide information on both hazardous waste and household hazardous waste to residents of a WHP area through the local newspaper and radio.
  • Provide articles on hazardous waste and household hazardous waste to local newsletters.
  • Set up displays on the WHP program.
  • Establish recognition programs for hazardous waste generators.

Provide the public with services relating to hazardous waste and household hazardous waste.

  • Use posters, flyers or water utility bill inserts to encourage residents of WHP areas to participate in county hazardous waste collection sites.
  • Contact county staff to explore the possibility of jointly sponsoring a hazardous waste collection day in the community.
  • Hire a contractor to provide a collection for very small quantity generators in the WHP area.
  • Promote collection programs available for very small quantity generators.
  • Work with a community business to sponsor a very small quantity generator collection.
  • Establish special waste collection programs for batteries, antifreeze, mercury switches and other mercury containing items.
  • Encourage residents of WHP areas to participate in existing special collection programs.
  • Publicize the availability of county product exchanges to WHP area residents through flyers, posters and notices.
  • Encourage local businesses to participate in self-audits.
  • Provide financial assistance to generators interested in hiring a private consultant to conduct an assessment.
  • Undertake a variety of tracking/evaluation activities of groundwater monitoring as part of a management strategy.
  • Survey hazardous waste generators and/or households in WHP areas to determine information needs.
  • Identify new businesses that may be hazardous waste generators.
  • Conduct periodic soil or groundwater sampling at businesses with large quantities of hazardous waste.
  • Act as an information and referral service for hazardous waste generators on available grants and loans.
  • Establish grant and loan programs for WHP activities.
  • Promote the availability of grants and loans to hazardous waste generators through flyers and direct mail.
Wellhead Protection (WHP) education and awareness

Educate the public about WHP.

  • Sponsor a workshop to educate property owners on the WHP plan.
  • Use a packet containing pamphlets and other printed information to inform property owners about WHP management techniques.
  • Create a video and show it through a local cable company.
  • Develop news releases, which can be used in newspaper articles, or as public service announcements.
  • Create newsletter articles about proper WHP and have them released in local or statewide newsletters.
  • Develop a newsletter specifically for landowners in the WHP area.
  • Set up a permanent display at a location where community members frequently visit.
  • Use a display at a seasonal event.
  • Contact each property owner in a WHP area to educate him or her directly.
  • Present WHP information to county boards, city councils and township boards.
  • Sponsor special events such as a welcome to wellhead protection.
  • Arrange a tour that demonstrates proper management techniques.
  • Create or help sponsor a children’s water festival, with hands-on activities.
  • Obtain a groundwater model and arrange to have demonstrations at local schools, churches, service clubs, fairs and other public activities.
  • Develop a slide or overhead presentation for local groups.

Provide the public services related to WHP education.

  • Send annual reminder notices to property owners reminding them of proper WHP management techniques.
On-site sewage systems

Educate the public about on-site sewer systems

  • Purchase videos on correct septic system operation/maintenance for each septic system owner in the WHP area.
  • Make several copies of a video available locally for loan.
  • Arrange for the airing of a video on your local cable station.
  • Develop news releases and public service announcements to be aired by local media.
  • Purchase paid advertising slots in news outlets.
  • Place articles in existing newsletters.
  • Consider developing a newsletter specifically for landowners in the WHP areas, which could highlight a variety of issues including septic systems.
  • Include information on septic system practices in existing newsletters.
  • Set up permanent displays.
  • Set up displays at seasonal events.
  • Contact domestic and commercial/industrial septic system owners within a WHP area to directly educate them about their systems.
  • Sponsor special events such as a welcome to wellhead protection, and invite all interested audiences to attend.
Urban stormwater

Educate the public about urban stormwater.

  • Work with city staff responsible for stormwater management, plot approval and building permits to ensure that new stormwater management structures are chosen with wellhead protection (WHP) in mind; existing stormwater management structures are properly maintained; stormwater structures have appropriate permits; and industrial ponds are lined.
  • Act as an information and referral source for developers, city staff and industrial pond operators.
  • Make available notices of upcoming training events, permit applications and information about proper design and operation of stormwater structures.

Provide the public with services relating to urban stormwater.

  • Work with city staff to ensure the design and operation of stormwater management structures proposed by industrial sites and developers will help prevent groundwater contamination.
  • Assist in designing new stormwater management structures that include pollution prevention plans to protect the WHP area and in assuring that pollution prevention plans for existing stormwater structures are up to date.
  • Assist organizations in implementing best management practices for outdoor vehicle and equipment washing, outdoor vehicle maintenance, outdoor hazardous materials storage and material loading and unloading.
  • Provide site visits to industries and construction sites to ensure that necessary permits have been secured, proper stormwater management practices are being followed and pollution prevention plans are in place.
  • Conduct periodic stormwater or groundwater sampling in the WHP area to alert the city of potential contamination before it reaches the water supply well.
  • Act as an information and referral service for available grants and loans.
  • Establish grant and loan programs for WHP activities.
  • Promote the availability of grants and loans through contacts with developers and others involved in stormwater management.
Aboveground and underground storage tanks

Educate the public about aboveground and underground storage tanks.

  • Encourage regulated tank owners in wellhead protection (WHP) areas to attend training workshops.
  • Mail or hand deliver training schedules to tank owners.
  • Provide a reduction in utility bills for attending training.
  • Provide scholarships for attending training.
  • Establish a city-sponsored recognition program for tank owners attending training.
  • Use information packets to educate tank owners on the importance of preventing leaks from tanks.
  • Work with the owner of a properly installed and maintained tank to host an open house to provide guidance to other tank owners.
  • Provide information on preventing leaks and proper tank maintenance to tank owners in WHP areas through local newspapers and radio.
  • Work with local cable access to produce a video on preventing leaks.
  • Provide articles to local newsletters.
  • Consider developing a newsletter specifically for landowners in the WHP area, which could highlight a variety of issues including storage tanks.
  • Set up displays on the WHP program at special events or on a long-term basis.

Provide the public with services relating to aboveground and underground storage tanks.

  • Offer workshops on conducting a farm or home assessment for interested farmers and homeowners.
  • Act as a local source of information and assistance for meeting regulatory requirements.
  • Send reminder notices to owners of new tanks about tank regulations and the importance of early leak detection.
  • Verify that newly installed regulated tanks meet state requirements.
  • Provide assistance to regulated and unregulated tank owners in properly maintaining tanks and detecting leaks.
  • For regulated underground storage tanks, work with tank owners on methods to use to check for leaks and how to keep records.
  • Assist regulated tank owners with leak detection and record keeping.
  • For aboveground storage tanks without secondary containment, arrange for a contractor to install containment structures at tanks in the WHP area during a specified time period.
  • For all aboveground storage tanks, take on monitoring of secondary containment structures for cracks and early detection of leaks and notify the tank owner of any cracks or leaks to ensure that proper repair and cleanup occurs.
  • For unregulated underground tanks, establish agreements with tank owners for access to their properties, take on the task of monitoring for leaks and work with the tank owners to ensure that proper repair and cleanup occurs.
  • Survey tank owners in WHP areas to determine information needs.
  • Identify new tanks installed in the WHP area and ensure that the tanks are installed to protect groundwater.
  • Make grants or loans available for tank owners.
  • Act as an information/referral service to available grants and loans.
  • Establish grant and/or loan funds for WHP activities.
Wells

Educate the public about wells.

  • Sponsor a workshop to educate property owners on the importance of properly filling and sealing unused wells.
  • Use a packet containing pamphlets and other printed information to inform property owners about well ownership responsibilities.
  • Create a video and show it through a local cable company.
  • Develop news releases which can be used in newspaper articles or as public service announcements.
  • Create newsletter articles about proper well management and have them released in local or statewide newsletters.
  • Develop a newsletter specifically for landowners in the wellhead protection (WHP) area which highlights well management practices.
  • Set up a permanent display at a location where community members frequently visit.
  • Use a display at a seasonal event.
  • Contact well owners in a WHP area to educate them directly.
  • Present well management information to county boards, city councils and township boards.
  • Sponsor special events such as a welcome to wellhead protection.

Provide the public services relating to wells.

  • Pay to replace damaged or missing sanitary well seals.
  • Assist well owners with collecting well water samples to insure that this is done correctly.
  • Be involved in coordinating local efforts to properly seal unused wells.
  • Assist well owners with obtaining funding for well sealing.
  • Review water connection information to identify properties that are not served by the public water supply system to identify wells which may need to be reconstructed or sealed.
  • Review building permits to identify homes or businesses that were supplied by a well when they were first connected, to further identify wells.
  • Identify businesses or homes that existed before the water distribution system was constructed or extended into that part of town, to further identify wells.
  • Conduct a survey to identify wells in the WHP area.
  • Ensure wells in WHP are constructed and compliant with applicable codes.
  • Monitor planning and zoning activities that may affect the WHP area.
  • Request notification of proposed land uses that may result in the installation of wells in the WHP area.
  • Work with the local water utility to address wells that do not meet the construction standards specified in the state well code.
  • Evaluate the water quality test results of wells within the WHP area to identify potential problems.
  • Financially assist well owners to insure that wells are properly installed, upgraded, maintained or sealed.
  • Act as an information and referral resource to identify existing sources of financial assistance such as grants, loans and cost-share programs.
  • Seek funding for the community to provide financial assistance to well owners.
  • Create a city-owned fund that would provide cost sharing or loans to well owners.
  • Consider buying certain wells that are strategically located for groundwater monitoring or pose a threat of funneling contaminants to the aquifer used by the public water supply.
  • Pay for the sealing of certain wells and the connection to the public water supply system.
Row crop farming

Educate the public about row crop farming.

  • Contact crop producers in the wellhead protection (WHP) area to personally talk with them about crop production methods and available financial assistance.
  • Work with local units of government to assess the feasibility of establishing on-farm demonstration projects.
  • Consider financing on-farm demonstration projects in the WHP area.
  • Encourage crop producers in the WHP area to attend agricultural workshops and seminars.
  • Co-sponsor, with other units of government, workshops or seminars on agricultural best management practices, financial assistance programs or other agricultural issues for crop producers in the WHP area.
  • Provide cost-share assistance for workshop registrants.
  • Sponsor special events, such as a welcome to wellhead protection, and invite all interested parties.
  • Offer field days or farm tours for crop producers within the WHP area.
  • Encourage crop producers to attend existing programs on timely agricultural issues.
  • Distribute a packet of printed material on financial assistance programs, particular crop production methods, fertilizers, rotations, soils and regions to crop producers within the WHP area.
  • Consider developing a newsletter specifically for crop producers within the WHP area, which could highlight a variety of agricultural issues related to crop production.
  • Provide articles to existing newsletters or newspapers that are read by many crop producers in the area.
  • Establish a recognition program to acknowledge crop producers that are wellhead protection friendly.”

Provide the public services related to row crop farming.

  • Assist in helping crop producers prepare and implement nutrient management plans.
  • Promote the use of certified agricultural technicians and professionals by providing lists of these individuals to crop producers.
  • Work with local units of government to support ongoing soil testing through promotion and cost sharing.
  • Work with local units of government to support manure testing through promotion and cost sharing.
  • Provide cost sharing for development of integrated pest management plans and weed and pest management plans for crop producers within the WHP area.
  • Support local unit of government grant applications geared towards addressing agricultural sources of nonpoint pollution sources in the WHP area.
  • Consider purchasing and leasing vulnerable acreages in the WHP area and enrolling the acreage in reserve programs.
  • Support crop producers in the WHP area by cost sharing in the cost of determining the financial impacts of shifting from row crop agriculture to perennial grass or forage production.
  • Assist in identifying qualifying acreage and providing technical and cost-share inputs to shift agricultural acreage out of row crop production and into perennial grasses or forage/cover crops for environmental benefit.
Turf management

Educate the public about turf management.

  • Contact residents in the wellhead protection (WHP) area to personally talk with them about turf, lawn and garden care.
  • Encourage homeowners and commercial turf and lawn care service providers in the WHP area to attend workshops and seminars relating to best management practices and any associated permits, licenses or certification.
  • Sponsor special events, such as a welcome to wellhead protection, and invite all interested audiences.
  • Work with a well-managed turf and lawn care property owner to host an open house for other residents and/or commercial businesses, allowing each to learn from one another.
  • Distribute a packet of printed information on turf, lawn and garden care best management practices to homeowners and commercial turf, lawn and garden care service providers.
  • Consider developing a newsletter specifically for homeowners and commercial turf, lawn and garden care service providers in the WHP area, which could highlight a variety of issues including best management practices, permit renewal guidance and training and workshop announcements.
  • Provide articles to existing newsletters that are read by many landowners in the WHP area.
  • Establish a recognition program to acknowledge homeowners and commercial turf, lawn and garden care service providers that are wellhead protection friendly.

Provide the public services related to turf management.

  • Collaborate with city planners, parks and recreation staff and public works officers to encourage their use of recommended practices on publicly owned turf and landscaped areas.
  • Encourage city personnel involved with turf and lawn management to attend workshops and periodically review educational materials on recommended management practices and then implement the practices.
  • Arrange for a highly visible school athletic field, public park, cemetery or golf course to establish a demonstration project incorporating best management practices, appropriate fertilizer rates and timing and assessment of phosphorus needs.
  • Post a highly visible school athletic field, public park, cemetery or golf course with educational signage that explains the demonstration project.
  • Promote waste pesticide collection services and programs.
  • Work with county planners, local soil and water conservation district staff and other agricultural related units of government to develop and support grant proposals that address turf, lawn and garden care.
  • Survey homeowners and commercial turf and lawn care service providers in the WHP area to determine information needs.
  • Identify new and existing suppliers of turf, lawn and garden products in order to target educational programs and enlist their cooperation.
  • Conduct periodic soil or groundwater sampling at or near facilities on publicly owned areas of turf and landscape management to determine if fine-tuning of management practices would be beneficial.

Last revised: Tuesday September 27 2016