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Examples

The following are examples of three common drinking water related violations that require public notification.

Example 1: Bacteriological Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) Violation

In this example, you take your routine bacteriological sample and it comes back from the lab "positive" or "unsafe" and the fecal coliform or E. coli test of that sample is also "positive" or "unsafe". You take repeat samples as required. The results from one or more of the repeat samples comes back from the lab "total coliform positive". You now have an acute bacteriological MCL violation that needs your immediate attention! You must disinfect the entire system including the well and all water distribution piping and you must notify your customers.

An acute bacteriological MCL violation requires a Tier 1 public notice "Boil/Bottle Water Advisory". You have up to 24 hours to notify your customers, via radio, television, hand delivery or posting. Posting typically works best for transient systems. You also need to contact your DNR Rep within 24 hours to learn if additional public notice requirements apply. Don't forget to send a copy of each notice and certification to your DNR Rep within 10 days of providing the notice to your customers.

Example 2: Nitrate MCL Violation

In this example, you get a nitrate MCL violation. You need to address the nitrate MCL violation and you need to notify your customers.

A nitrate MCL violation requires a Tier 1 public notice. You have up to 24 hours to notify your customers. You may do this via radio, television, hand delivery or posting. Posting typically works best for transient systems. You also need to contact your DNR Rep within 24 hours to learn if additional public notice requirements apply. Don't forget to send a copy of each notice and certification to your DNR Rep within 10 days of providing the notice to your customers.

Example 3: Missed Bacteriological Sample

In this example, you didn't take your bacteriological sample on time, which results in a monitoring and reporting violation (M/R violation). You need to collect your bacteriological sample and you need to notify your customers.

An M/R violation requires a Tier 3 public notice. You have up to 1 year to notify your customers. You may do this via mail, hand delivery, posting or any other method that reaches your customers. Tier 3 notices may also be combined into an annual report if the violations are less than 1 year old. Community systems may add Tier 3 notices to their Consumer Confidence Report (CCR) if the violations that are less than 1 year old. Don't forget to send a copy of each notice (or annual report or CCR) and certification to your DNR Rep within 10 days of providing the notice to your customers.

Last revised: Thursday August 30 2012