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Weekly News Published - August 30, 2016 by the Central Office

 

Sept. 17 marks opening of archery and crossbow deer hunting seasons

Archery and crossbow seasons open Sept. 17.
Archery and crossbow seasons open Sept. 17.
Photo Credit: DNR archives

MADISON - Increased deer observations following another mild winter has hunters and state wildlife officials alike excited for fall hunting seasons - the 2016 archery and crossbow deer seasons run concurrently statewide from Sept. 17 to Jan. 8, 2017.

"Hunters should expect excellent hunting opportunities in most areas within the central and southern farmland zones, and hopefully see improvements in the forested zones," said Kevin Wallenfang, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources big game ecologist. "With another mild winter, reports of excellent antler growth and good fawn production are common."

Deer hunters in 10 predominantly forested counties will see buck-only hunting again this year as part of continued efforts to rebuild the deer herd in these areas. Throughout the remainder of the state, antlerless hunting opportunities are available through the use of Farmland Zone and bonus antlerless deer tags.

Archery and crossbow deer hunters have a continuous season framework that includes hunting during all gun deer seasons in November and December, plus the option to fill a gun deer tag using crossbow or archery equipment during open firearm seasons.

In its first two years, hunting with a crossbow has provided an additional opportunity for many hunters throughout Wisconsin, and accounts for the highest rate of participation by women than any other deer hunting method. Those interested in using both a conventional bow and crossbow may do so by paying full price for one of the licenses and purchasing a $3 upgrade for the second license. Hunters will use the same buck tag and antlerless tags issued with their first license of choice.

Tree stands and ground blinds used on DNR-managed lands must be removed daily. For other types of property such as county or federally owned lands, contact the property manager to learn about these rules.

Bonus antlerless tags remain available in many deer management units. Bonus tags may be filled with any weapon type during the appropriate season, but must be filled in the zone, county and land type designated on each tag. Bonus tags are available on a first-come, first-served basis at a cost of $12 each for residents, $20 each for non-residents, and $5 for youth hunters age 10-11.

In 2016, up to three Farmland (Zone 2) antlerless tags are included with each deer hunting license, depending on the Deer Management Unit of choice. Hunters who have not yet purchased a license for hunting deer will be prompted to select the unit and land-type for the Farmland (Zone 2) antlerless tags at the point of sale. Licenses may be purchased through the Go Wild website, GoWild.WI.Gov or at any of the more than 1,000 Go Wild license sales locations.

Hunters who purchased their deer hunting licenses earlier in the year, or who have yet to determine hunting location, may defer the Farmland (Zone 2) antlerless tag selection. When ready, hunters may:

2016 Wisconsin Fall Hunting and Trapping Forecast now available

Many fall hunting and trapping seasons in Wisconsin are just around the corner, and the 2016 Fall Hunting and Trapping Forecast [PDF] is now available.

To view this year's hunting and trapping forecast, visit dnr.wi.gov and search keywords "forecast [PDF]" or "hunt."

People who missed three August live chats regarding deer hunting can review chat records online - search keyword "expert" and choose the chat of your choice.

GameReg

All harvested deer will be registered electronically in 2016. GameReg is simple, fast and convenient for hunters. The system will prompt hunters to answer a series of questions, beginning with the carcass tag number and date of birth.

GameReg will generate a 10-character confirmation number, which must be written on the paper carcass tag that accompanies the harvested animal. Hunters are reminded to carry a pen or pencil to write the 10-character number on the tag. When this registration number is written on the tag, the animal is considered legally registered.

All deer must be registered by 5 p.m. the day after the deer is recovered, and hunters must retain the tag with confirmation number as proof of registration until the deer has been consumed.

Hunters will have three options for registering their deer:

A link to the GameReg system is available through the Pocket Ranger app for mobile devices. For more information regarding electronic registration, search the DNR website for keyword "GameReg."

To receive email updates regarding deer hunting in Wisconsin, visit dnr.wi.gov and click on the email icon near the bottom of the page titled "subscribe for updates for DNR topics," then follow the prompts and select the "white-tailed deer" distribution list (found within the "hunting" list).

Deer hunters are also encouraged to check out the frequently asked questions page for more information regarding changes for 2016. And, remember to check out the carcass tagging FAQ (search keywords "tag it").

For more general information regarding deer hunting in Wisconsin, search keyword "deer."

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Crossbow, archery hunters should review safety rules before the first trek in woods

MADISON - The Wisconsin archery and crossbow deer seasons run concurrently statewide from Sept. 17 to Jan. 8, 2017, and a few quick safety tips will help ensure another safe year in the field.

The four basic rules of firearm safety (TABK) also apply to crossbow use and hunting.

Treestand fall is the leading cause of injuries to archery hunters

Jon King , DNR hunter education administrative warden, says if a tree stand is part of your hunting tradition, it's best to review key safety tips.

"A treestand fall is the leading cause of injuries to archery hunters," King said.

To reduce chances of taking a treestand fall while archery hunting, King advises these two top tips:

For more information search the DNR website, dnr.wi.gov, for "Tree Stand Safety."

Here are a few more things Hunter Education Administrative Warden Jon King urges people to remember if they plan to hunt with a crossbow this year:

During open firearm seasons, a gun deer license will authorize bow and crossbow use. Crossbow and archer licenses include one statewide buck tag and up to three Farmland (Zone 2) antlerless tags, depending on the Deer Management Unit of choice. It is important to remember hunters purchasing a traditional bow (archer) and a crossbow license will receive only one set of tags.

In addition, tree stands and ground blinds used on DNR-managed lands must be removed daily. For other types of property such as county or federally owned lands, contact the property manager to learn about these rules.

For more information, check out the 2016 Deer Hunting Regulations, or visit dnr.wi.gov and search keyword "deer."

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Fall wild turkey, ruffed grouse and woodcock seasons set to open

MADISON - Prospects are good for fall wild turkey, ruffed grouse and woodcock hunting seasons, according to state wildlife officials who say hunters should look forward to another exciting year in the field.

Wild turkey

Fall turkey season opens Sept. 17
Fall turkey season opens Sept. 17
Photo Credit: DNR

"Fall turkey hunters can look forward to good opportunities this year," said Mark Witecha,Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources upland wildlife ecologist. "The fall turkey season definitely offers some variety in hunting tactics and strategy compared to the spring season, and you can't beat the backdrop of a Wisconsin autumn."

The fall turkey season runs from Sept. 17 to Nov. 18 statewide, with an extended fall season in Turkey Management Zones 1-5 continuing through Dec. 31.

Overall, Wisconsin's statewide wild turkey population remains strong. After 30 years of sustained population growth and expansion across the state, wild turkeys are now found statewide. Wild turkey numbers appear to be stabilizing at levels suitable to available habitat - they will likely ebb and flow around those levels in response to weather, food availability and other natural factors.

Biologists closely monitor harvest during the either-sex fall turkey hunting season, as excessive hen harvest can affect turkey populations. Recent hen harvests in Wisconsin have been very low, and Witecha says current hen harvest rates do not play a significant role in the dynamics of Wisconsin's turkey flock.

"We saw a 10 percent increase in harvest this spring compared to 2015, and hunters enjoyed high success rates across the state," said Witecha. "With the exception of a couple of heavy rain events in the northern part of the state earlier this summer, weather has been favorable across the state for much of the year, so the population should remain stable."

Turkey hunters are reminded that they are subject to the blaze orange requirement for ground blinds erected on DNR lands during any gun deer season. Ground blinds on DNR lands left unattended during legal hunting hours must display the owner's name and address or DNR customer ID number near the door opening. Ground blinds may not be left out overnight, and must be removed entirely from the property at the close of hunting hours each day.

Turkey ground blind rules do not apply to ground blinds being used for hunting waterfowl, or blinds built using only natural vegetation found on DNR property. However, all waterfowl blinds on state-owned property and used for waterfowl hunting must permanently display the name of the owner in lettering one-inch square or larger, including when a hunter is using the blind.

As in recent years, the use of dogs to hunt wild turkey is allowed statewide for the fall seasons.

To receive email updates regarding turkey hunting in Wisconsin, visit dnr.wi.gov and click on the email icon near the bottom of the page titled "subscribe for updates for DNR topics," then follow the prompts and select the "wild turkey" distribution list (found within the "hunting" list).

Ruffed Grouse

In Zone A, the ruffed grouse season opens Sept. 17 and runs through Jan. 31, 2016. In Zone B, the season will open Oct. 15 and close Dec. 8.

Ruffed grouse drumming surveys have been used since 1964 to help monitor ruffed grouse population trends in Wisconsin.

Roughed grouse
Ruffed grouse
Photo Credit: Paul Carson

"While statewide trends were essentially stable, the two regions that make up the primary grouse habitat in the state showed increased drumming activity in 2016," said Brian Dhuey, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources wildlife survey coordinator. "Ruffed grouse populations are known to rise and fall over a nine- to 11-year cycle, and the last peak in Wisconsin's cycle occurred in 2011 -- survey results suggest that we have reached the low point in the population cycle and may have started the building phase, which should continue the next few years as the grouse population increases toward the next peak."

Grouse hunters are reminded to register with the Harvest Information Program if they plan to pursue woodcock, mourning doves or other migratory game birds. Registration is free and is available through all license vendors, as well as online.

In 2016, the woodcock season will be open from Sept. 24 to Nov. 7.

Go Wild

Leftover fall turkey permits can be purchased through the Online Licensing Center, license agents, and DNR Service Centers. Please note that telephone sales are no longer available.

Hunters who are still interested in obtaining fall turkey permits can check availability online at dnr.wi.gov, by searching for "fall turkey permits" or contact the DNR Customer Call Center, open 7 a.m. through 10 p.m., seven days a week, at 1-888-WDNRINFo (1-888-936-7463). For more information regarding Go Wild, visit GoWild.WI.Gov.

GameReg

All harvested turkeys and sharp-tailed grouse will be registered electronically [PDF] in 2016. GameReg is simple, fast and convenient for hunters. The system will prompt hunters to answer a series of questions, beginning with the carcass tag number and date of birth.

GameReg will generate a 10-character confirmation number, which must be written on the paper carcass tag that accompanies the harvested animal. Hunters are reminded to carry a pen or pencil to write the 10-character number on the tag. When this registration number is written on the tag, the animal is considered legally registered.

Hunters will have two options for registering their turkey or sharp-tailed grouse:

All turkeys and sharp-tailed grouse must be registered by 5 p.m. the day after harvest, and hunters must retain the tag with confirmation number as proof of registration until the meat has been consumed. A link to the GameReg system is available through the Pocket Ranger app for mobile devices. For more information regarding electronic registration, search "GameReg."

2016 Fall Hunting and Trapping Forecast

Many fall hunting and trapping seasons in Wisconsin are just around the corner, and this year's Fall Hunting and Trapping Forecast [PDF] is now available.

To view this year's hunting and trapping forecast, visit dnr.wi.gov and search keyword "forecast [PDF]."

FFLIGHT

The Fields and Forest Lands Interactive Gamebird Hunting Tool gives hunters an interactive summary of young aspen and alder habitat to find woodcock and ruffed grouse hunting areas, pheasant-stocked public hunting grounds, and dove fields found on public hunting lands throughout Wisconsin

Features available within the program help hunters locate DNR public parking areas, overlay township descriptions, and provide access to maps and aerial photos of prospective hunting areas. Users can also print maps and find GPS coordinates to assist in navigation and estimate acreage and walking distance.

The mapping application is compatible with all major desktop and mobile web browsers (internet access is required). Mobile users can use FFLIGHT on-the-go to find habitat suitable for the species they wish to pursue. To learn more, search keyword "FFLIGHT."

For more information regarding wild turkeys and ruffed grouse in Wisconsin, search keywords "turkey" and "ruffed grouse."

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Sturgeon hook and line season highlights sound management efforts

MADISON - Wisconsin's hook and line sturgeon season gets underway September 3, offering a chance to celebrate efforts to restore the majestic and valuable fish to more of its native range.

The sturgeon hook and line season runs until Sept. 30 and has generated strong angler interest in recent years. In 2015, the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources issued some 29,694 tags to anglers who intend to take to lakes and rivers of the state in pursuit of lake sturgeon, up from about 28,000 in 2014.

. The general hook and line season covers waters including parts of the Chippewa River; Flambeau River; Butternut Lake (Price County); Jump River; Yellow, Little Yellow and the Danbury Flowage chain (Burnett County); Menominee River (Marinette County); St. Croix River and portions of the Wisconsin River. The minimum length limit for lake sturgeon harvest is 60 inches.
The 2016 sturgeon hook and line season offers plenty of reasons for excitement. Among them: this 83.2" lake sturgeon was handled and safely released during recent survey work on the Turtle Flambeau Flowage.
The 2016 sturgeon hook and line season offers plenty of reasons for excitement. Among them: this 83.2" lake sturgeon was handled and safely released during recent survey work on the Turtle Flambeau Flowage.
Photo Credit: DNR

"We are pleased at the continued progress being made by DNR and its many partners to expand available habitat and reintroduce fish to areas where they have a chance at reproduction," said Justine Hasz, DNR fisheries bureau director. "Interest in hook and line sturgeon fishing has been strong in recent years and we know many anglers enjoy the opportunity to participate on a catch and release basis. This year we are offering several areas featuring extended catch and release opportunities."

New catch and release opportunities for this year include:

Ryan Koenigs, DNR fisheries biologist and sturgeon team leader, said the hook and line season also offers anglers the opportunity to harvest the fish of a lifetime. For example, in 2015, anglers harvested six sturgeon from the Flambeau River and one from the Chippewa withthe largest fish being 68 inches and 83 pounds..The 2014 season also produced some very large fish from the area with one measuring 70 inches and weighing in at 70.5 pounds.

"We appreciate angler participation in the hook and line sturgeon season as the money collected from the sale of the sturgeon harvest tags goes right back into funding our stocking and restoration efforts," Koenigs said. "The sturgeon is part of our state's rich natural heritage and sturgeon enthusiasts are now able to enjoy more opportunities to pursue this fish."

The Wild Rose State Fish Hatchery serves most waters in the state and has been producing as many as 40,000 sturgeon each year since the second phase of its renovation was completed in 2010.

A complete list of inland waters with a hook and line sturgeon season can be found in the 2016-2017 Fishing Regulations. In addition to a fishing license for non-exempt anglers, those who intend to harvest a sturgeon must purchase a sturgeon harvest tag before bringing in a fish. (The harvest tags are not required for catch and release.)

Harvest tags cost $20 for residents and $50 for nonresidents and can be purchased by visiting GoWild.wi.gov. Harvest tags can be held by the angler as long as the angler remains with the fish but otherwise must be attached. Harvest tags must be immediately validated after catching a sturgeon of legal length that the angler wishes to keep. A harvested sturgeon must be registered at a designated registration station by 6 p.m. of the day following harvest.

Anglers pursuing the catch and release option are encouraged to use special care in handling the fish. Although it is not illegal to boat a sturgeon and quickly take a photo, the fish may grow to be more than six feet long and live more than 100 years so if it is a large fish, consider leaving it in the water.

Do not tether or tie the sturgeon by the tail to weigh it, as this can cause physical damage to the fish. Also, avoid lifting the fish by the head as this can stress or damage the gill plates. If a smaller sturgeon is caught, simply hold the fish under the belly when handling. After landing the fish and taking any photos or measurements, release it quickly to reduce stress and ensure survival.

More information is available by searching dnr.wi.gov for "lake sturgeon" or visiting Sturgeon Inland Fishery.

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2016 Wisconsin wild rice harvest season outlook

MADISON - Wild rice abundance across northern Wisconsin will vary for the 2016 ricing season -- reports from the field note that the rice crop is "well below average" to "poor" throughout much of the state, while a handful of lakes hold quality crops.

Wild rice
Wild rice abundance across northern Wisconsin will vary for the 2016 ricing season.
Photo Credit: DNR

"Harvesting wild rice continues to gain attention as a great way to gather your own food while enjoying some of the best areas of the state," said Jason Fleener, Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources wetland habitat specialist. Noting the rice conditions this year, Fleener added, "gathering wild rice this year will require early scouting and patience."

Fleener also encourages those interested in harvesting wild rice to speak with local ricers or rice finishers to find out when rice is ready for harvesting, as well as which lakes in the region have harvestable beds of rice.

Wild rice is considered ripe when it begins to fall off the stalk with little effort stroking the flails (ricing sticks) across the rice plants. If little rice is falling with minimal effort, ricers should consider finding a new area to harvest or return at a later time to prevent damage to immature rice beds.

Wild Rice waters are divided into two separate categories for harvest: date-regulated and non-date-regulated. Date-regulated lakes are located within the Chippewa Indian Ceded Territory in off-reservation areas in the northern part of the state. One exception is Lake Noquebay in Marinette County, a date-regulated lake outside of the Ceded Territory.

Opening harvest dates for date-regulated waters are determined jointly by DNR and tribal officials. Once a particular date-regulated lake is opened, the wild rice harvesting season will last 60 days. All date-regulated waters are posted at access points at least 24 hours in advance of opening day. Many date-regulated waters will be closed for the 2016 season due to poor rice conditions. Closures protect and replenish seed stock and help promote rice growth for future years.

A list of date-regulated lakes with harvesting status can be found on the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife Commission's wild rice website [exit DNR]. This webpage provides rice abundance information for each body of water listed based on annual aerial and ground survey information.

Ricers may encounter other recreationalists on the water, including anglers, boaters and early season teal hunters. Boaters are encouraged to create no wake in the vicinity of rice beds and avoid direct contact with areas that contain wild rice.

Those harvesting wild rice should be aware that wild rice growing along rivers, streams, and flowages adjacent to private land may be privately owned. Ricers are encouraged to check local land ownership records before beginning their harvest.

The department recently updated the wild rice webpage to include new information about harvesting wild rice, including a question and answer section. Additionally, a short video was created that offers an introductory look at the tools and techniques of wild rice harvest. The video can be viewed on the department's Youtube page, or by dnr.wi.gov, keywords "wild rice."


How to harvest wild rice.
Video Credit: DNR

To receive email updates regarding wild rice in Wisconsin, visit dnr.wi.gov and click on the email icon near the bottom of the page titled "subscribe for updates for DNR topics," then follow the prompts and select the appropriate distribution list.

For more information regarding wild rice licensing and harvest regulations, search keywords "wild rice."

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Starry stonewort verified in Door County's Sturgeon Bay; first confirmed discovery in Lake Michigan

STURGEON BAY, Wis. - Starry stonewort, an aquatic invasive species, has been verified in the Sturgeon Bay Channel in Door County.

It is the first confirmed discovery of the invasive macroalgae in Lake Michigan and the first occurrence in the state outside of six southeastern Wisconsin lakes.

Stary stonewort
Starry stonewort
Photo Credit: Scott Brown

The population was discovered during routine aquatic plant monitoring survey by a lake management contractor for the city of Sturgeon Bay. The contractor provided photos and live specimens to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources and invasive species staff confirmed the finding through a verification process involving staff and independent experts from the New York Botanical Garden.

Bob Wakeman, DNR aquatic invasive species program coordinator, said the discovery reinforces the need for boaters to take action to stop aquatic invasive species. To prevent the spread of starry stonewort and other aquatic invasive species, Wisconsin law requires all boaters to:

"Given Sturgeon Bay's popularity as a destination for recreational boaters and anglers from across the region, starry stonewort has the potential to spread to many new lakes," Wakeman said. "All boaters have the ability to stop the spread of invasive species by removing plants and draining water before leaving the boat landing."

To help communities respond to this new threat and other aquatic invasive species, DNR can provide grants of up to $25,000 to start Clean Boats, Clean Waters watercraft inspection programs and fund management actions for recently discovered pioneer populations. Clean Boats, Clean Waters programs often use community volunteers to serve as watercraft inspectors at local boat launches. DNR also encourages citizens to become engaged in the Citizen Lake Monitoring Network, which provides access to training from lake experts from across the state.

Starry stonewort was first discovered in the U.S. in the St. Lawrence River in 1978 and has been documented in portions of the eastern Great Lakes as well as various inland lakes in Michigan, Indiana, and Minnesota. It was discovered in Wisconsin 2014 and has negative effects similar to other invasive aquatic plants, including clogging waterways and outcompeting native plants.

To learn more about starry stonewort, visit dnr.wi.gov, and search for "regulated invasive algae."

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DNR issues permit for Enbridge Line 3 Replacement Project

SUPERIOR, Wis. - The Wisconsin Department of Natural has issued a permit for wetland and waterway crossings required for Enbridge to replace a 14-mile segment of pipeline known as "Line 3" in Douglas County.

Line 3 extends from Alberta, Canada through North Dakota and Minnesota to Superior. The project in Wisconsin involves replacing the 1960s vintage 34 inch pipe with a new 36 inch diameter pipeline that could carry up to 760,000 barrels per day. The pipeline would cross approximately 14 miles of land mostly following the old pipeline route in the town of Superior, village of Superior and city of Superior, terminating at the Enbridge Superior Terminal.

Enbridge has also proposed construction of a new 30-inch diameter crude oil pipeline, called "Sandpiper" that could carry up to 375,000 barrels per day and extend 600 miles from the Bakken Shale region in North Dakota through Minnesota to Superior.

"At this time we are only addressing the permits for Line 3. The next steps for our review of the Sandpiper permit application will depend on the regulatory decision process in the state of Minnesota," said Ben Callan, DNR project manager. "We do not know how recent reports of investment by the company in a pipeline through Iowa and Illinois will affect the Sandpiper project proposal at this time."

Before any construction can occur on Line 3, permits from the US Army Corps of Engineers will be addressed through a separate federal process.

The DNR has completed an environmental impact statement (or EIS) process to evaluate the potential impacts of both Line 3 and Sandpiper to provide information to the public and decision makers in advance of any regulatory decisions.

The environmental impact statement is meant to inform decision makers, agencies, tribes, local governments and the public about the environmental effects associated with the construction, operation and maintenance of the pipelines in Wisconsin.

The department prepared a draft environmental impact statement in compliance with NR 150, Wis. Adm. Code. The draft statement was available for public review from February 24 to March 25, 2016. A public hearing was held at the Superior Public Library on March 10, 2016, with more than 70 individuals attending. The department has summarized and responded to all the public comments received.

The comment and response document is included in the final environmental impact statement. Both the final environmental impact statement and the DNR permit for the Line 3 project can be found by searching the DNR website for "Enbridge."

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$5 New Buyer's License: fun for a bargain

MADISON -- One of the best outdoor fun bargains around is the $5 New Buyer's License at the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, according to Keith Warnke, the agency's hunting and shooting sports coordinator.

Residents and nonresidents who have not been issued a license, or a conservations patron or sports license, in the last 10 years are eligible to participate. New buyer residents pay $5 for their license, and nonresidents can buy theirs for half price.

"This is an excellent value," Warnke said. "There's a banquet of options out there."

The following licenses are available through this program:

Warnke says buyers can purchase as many of these licenses as eligible for, and can do so during the same year. GoWild.WI.Gov or at any of the more than 1,000 Go Wild license sales locations.

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Recruiter Rewards: Discounts for mentors who introduce hunting to novices

MADISON -- Experienced hunters who share this Wisconsin tradition with novices may be eligible for half-price license discounts under a state program recognizing the importance of mentors.

Keith Warnke, hunting and shooting sports coordinator for the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, says the program acknowledges how hunters form special bonds. "Whether they are family, friends or coworkers, hunting together creates a lifetime of fun and memories."

Implemented in 2012, the recruiter rewards program operates as follows:

All license- buying conservationists can participate in this program (hunters, anglers and trappers) since it applies to any first-time buyer purchase across all types. Once three first-time buyers identify the same mentor as their recruiter for any hunting, angling or trapping license, GoWild will offer the mentor a recruiter license.

A few other details apply:

For more information about mentored hunting, search the DNR website for keywords "mentored hunting."

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Plan learn to hunt events now; pheasants a popular, budget-saving pick

MADISON -- September 1 kicks off fall hunting, making it what the state's hunting and shooting sports coordinator calls the ideal time to start planning learn to hunt events.

"While hunters are planning their own outings, they can also think about planning Learn to Hunts events," Keith Warnke of the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources said. "There's still time to get applications in."

An often-overlooked benefit of Learn to Hunts, and hunting in general, is the food harvested. From tender small game like rabbits and squirrels to flavorful gamebirds and hearty big game like deer, hunting puts lean, naturally raised protein on the table. "Hunters get exercise when they participate," Warnke said. "On top of that, the food just can't be beat."

Deer, waterfowl and spring turkey Learn to Hunts are traditional favorites, Warnke says, adding a very popular, economical choice is the pheasant. Kelly Macguire, Poynette Game Farm director, agrees.

"Remember, if you're hosting a Learn to Hunt pheasant, sponsors can get free pheasants from the DNR game farm for the event," Maguire said.

She said the State Game Farm in Poynette supplies two birds per participant, up to 50 birds per event. The newly renovated facility produces an impressive 75,000 pheasants a year for release on public hunting grounds.

"It's a great deal and helps our partners put on fantastic events," Maguire said. She reminds those planning pheasant hunting events to submit completed, signed Learn to Hunt applications in order to get their pheasants.

For more information on all your Learn to Hunt needs, search the DNR website for keyword "LTH."

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Online bobcat chat Sept. 15 at noon

MADISON - Join Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources experts Thursday, Sept. 15 at noon for an online chat about bobcats in Wisconsin.

Bobcat
Bobcat
Photo Credit: DNR

Bobcats can be found throughout much of the state, and are a species of great curiosity due to their secretive nature. Staff will be on hand to answer questions ranging from habitat to upcoming studies and behavior.

Visit dnr.wi.gov and search keyword "chat" to submit questions and view responses from DNR experts. Here, you can also view past chats and sign up to receive email notifications.

For more information regarding bobcats in Wisconsin, visit dnr.wi.gov and search keyword "furbearers."

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The Weekly News is updated every Tuesday at noon.
Read more: Previous Weekly News

Last Revised: Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Contact information

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James Dick
Director of Communications
608-267-2773