LRP - Licenses

LRP - Regulations

LRP - Permits

Recreation - Statewide

Recreation - Trapping

Recreation - Fishing

Recreation - Hunting

Env. Protection - Management

Env. Protection - Emergency

Env. Protection - Resources

To sign up for updates or to access your subscriber preferences, please enter your contact information below.



 

Weekly News Published - March 28, 2017 by the Central Office

 

April public comment period will provide opportunity to give feedback regarding preliminary antlerless harvest quota recommendations

MADISON -- County Deer Advisory Councils have released their preliminary deer antlerless quota, permit level, and season structure recommendations for the 2017 deer hunting season., A public comment period will be open from April 3 - 13 to collect feedback on the preliminary recommendations.

To provide your feedback and to learn more about County Deer Advisory Councils, visit dnr.wi.gov and search keyword "CDAC."

Antlerless quota recommendations will help determine the number of antlerless permits available for the 2017 deer hunting season and help the Department of Natural Resources and councils work to achieve the three-year population objective in their county.

"CDACs are considering the three-year population objective and factors like harvest data, population trends, browse impacts on habitat, and winter severity when they discuss quota recommendations and permit levels," said Kevin Wallenfang, DNR big game ecologist. "Public input continues to be a critical component of CDAC recommendations."

Once the public comment period has ended, each council will reconvene to evaluate feedback received from the public and to determine final recommendations for the DNR. All meetings are open to the public, and provide the opportunity for attendees to address the council. Meetings will take place from April 17-20 and details for each county can be found at dnr.wi.gov and search keyword "CDAC."

People who would like to receive email updates and other information regarding deer hunting and season structure in Wisconsin, can visit the DNR website, dnr.wi.gov, and click on the email icon near the bottom of the page for "subscribe for updates for DNR topics." Follow the prompts and select "white-tailed deer" within the "hunting" list.

________________________

 

State National Archery in the Schools Program tournament to be held in Wisconsin Dells

MADISON - About 1,600 of Wisconsin's youth archers are set to gather this weekend to aim for top honors at the 2017 Wisconsin National Archery in the Schools Program state tournament at Wisconsin Dells.

The annual event is scheduled for March 31 - April 1 at the Woodside Convention and Expo center in Wisconsin Dells.

More than 1,500 attended the NASP tournament last year, and more than 1,600 are expected this year.
More than 1,500 attended the NASP tournament last year, and more than 1,600 are expected this year.
Photo Credit: DNR

About 1,600 boy and girl archers from grades 3 through 12 from 66 state schools will compete.

Department of Natural Resources Secretary Cathy Stepp says the program offers school children a chance to experience a sport they may not have known was available to them. "The schools themselves have been effective in keeping this program growing year after year by introducing students to the sport and encouraging them as teammates in competition," she said.

Students compete in individual and team categories.
Students compete in individual and team categories.Students compete in individual and team categories.
Photo Credit: DNR

Students at this year's state tournament will compete for individual and team awards in elementary, middle and high school divisions, as well as a chance to qualify for the program's national tournament in Louisville, Ky. That tournament is expected to attract more than 15,000 archers from all over the country.

The event also will feature a competitive NASP/IBO 3-D animal range, a bow fishing shooting area and several exhibitors.

Through NASP, archery is typically taught during the school day as part of a physical education curriculum. Every student uses identical, universal fit, equipment and is taught safety, proper form, shooting and scoring arrows and much more. Interested teachers can attend a one-day training session to receive Basic Archery Instructors certification. Archery equipment and a teaching curriculum is provided and grants are available to help offset any initial startup costs for schools. With the grants, schools can get started with minimal investment and budget strain.

For more information, visit the DNR website, dnr.wi.gov, and search keyword "NASP" or visit naspschools.org (exit DNR).

________________________

 

DNR, UW faculty, Walleyes for Tomorrow join forces to study value of Green Bay fishery

GREEN BAY -- Starting Saturday, anglers who fish in Green Bay will be asked to participate in a new study designed to calculate the social, recreational and economic impact of the region's fishery.

Given the area's world-class walleye fishing, Great Lakes spotted musky population, whitefish, bass, yellow perch, trout and salmon opportunities, the impact is significant. Green Bay represents a key destination for the 178,000 in-state and out-of-state anglers who participate in Wisconsin's Great Lakes sportfishing each year.

Peshtigo River walleye anglers take advantage of the spring bite.
Peshtigo River walleye anglers take advantage of the spring bite.
Photo Credit: DNR

According to the most recent data from the American Sportfishing Association, in 2011 these anglers contributed more than $114 million in direct retail expenditures and more than $12.5 million in state and local taxes. The research project's collaborators - including the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources; faculty from University of Wisconsin -Green Bay and University of Wisconsin -Whitewater; and members of Walleyes for Tomorrow - believe the impact is growing in size and scope in northeastern Wisconsin.

"Spring, summer, fall and winter all bring different angling opportunities and provide year-round enjoyment for many people," said Mike Donofrio, DNR fisheries team supervisor in Peshtigo. "We're excited to learn what people value most about the fishing here and how their widespread participation supports jobs in the region."

John Stoll, chair of the Public and Environmental Affairs Department at UW-Green Bay, said the project will use DNR creel clerks and other staff to randomly distribute the surveys over the next 12 months. The results will demonstrate the economic impact angling activities have on regional economies and provide a better understanding of the social benefits that arise from sound resource management in Wisconsin.

In addition to providing data that will help inform future resource management, Stoll said the project highlights the UW System faculty members' commitment to researching topics of statewide economic importance.

The study will continue over the coming year and examine all types of fishing throughout warm and cold weather seasons. The surveys are being returned to UW-Whitewater's Fiscal and Economic Research Center, which provides economic analysis for the state of Wisconsin and coordination for the project.

Questions include the number of times anglers visit Green Bay, the amount of equipment they own and the species they prefer to target. The subject matter is similar to a 2006 survey Stoll conducted on the Lake Winnebago fishery that calculated direct angler expenditures of $155.5 million and benefits such as increased tourism and downtown revitalization.

"We appreciate the support of DNR with this effort and we are particularly grateful to Walleyes for Tomorrow for funding the research," Stoll said. The angling group has committed to providing $15,000 of the $20,000 needed for the project. The remainder is being provided by the University of Wisconsin - Whitewater's Institute for Water Business, which promotes the nexus between water and commerce.

Mike Arrowood, chairman of Walleyes for Tomorrow, said support for the study fits well with the group's long-term commitment to the region's fishery. The survey will cover Brown, Door, Kewaunee, Marinette and Oconto counties.

"Our understanding of the fishery has continued to evolve even as the fishery itself has progressed," Arrowood said. "Thanks to water quality improvements and ongoing habitat work supported by our group and others in places including the Peshtigo and Oconto rivers, walleye restoration efforts continue to bear fruit today with a self-sustaining population in southern Green Bay. We hope the study will help document the importance of these trends to the region's economy and everyone who lives, works and recreates here."

________________________

 

Building bat houses now can aid bats that survive white-nose syndrome

MADISON - People can help bats that survive white-nose syndrome this winter by building a bat house where they can raise their young during summer months.

Stacy Schumacher of Madison builds a bat house. Wisconsin residents, Girl and Boy Scouts, conservation club members and volunteers have stepped up to build hundreds of bat houses in recent years.
Stacy Schumacher of Madison builds a bat house. Wisconsin residents, Girl and Boy Scouts, conservation club members and volunteers have stepped up to build hundreds of bat houses in recent years.
Photo Credit: Heather Kaarakka

"Bats surviving white-nose syndrome need all the help they can get to raise their young and help rebuild populations," said Heather Kaarakka, a Department of Natural Resources conservation biologist who works with Wisconsin's bat populations for the Natural Heritage Conservation Bureau.

For easy instructions and how-to videos, check out the Department of Natural Resources' bat house web pages at dnr.wi.gov, keyword "bat house." DNR's Bat House Building Handbook provides full instructions for building and installing bat houses.

White-nose syndrome poses serious threat for Wisconsin bats

White-nose syndrome, named for the powdery white fuzz that can develop on hibernating bats' noses, ears and wings after infection with the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, causes bats to awaken more often during hibernation, thus burning up critical stores of fat they need to survive winter.

Since white-nose syndrome was documented at a single Wisconsin site in April 2014, it has spread to more than 50 mines and caves in 20 of the 24 Wisconsin counties with known bat hibernacula. Bat populations in Wisconsin hibernacula where WNS has been present two or more years have declined 30 to 80 percent.

Wisconsin's little brown and big brown bats are the most likely species to take up residence in bat houses. A bat nursery house can provide shelter for 100 to 300 little brown bats. For easy instructions and how-to videos, check out the Department of Natural Resources' bat house web pages at dnr.wi.gov, keywords "bat house."

When built and placed correctly, bat houses offer safe, warm habitat for maternity colonies, Kaarakka says. Mother bats can give birth to their young there and the house provides shelter while mother bats leave the roost nightly to feed and while the pups remain in the roost until they are able to fly.

Properties where there are already bat roosts are good candidates for bat houses. Providing a bat house can help get bats out of old homes, barns and other buildings while helping keep these beneficial insect-eating mammals around. State law prohibits disturbing bat roosts from June 1 through Aug. 15 to protect mothers and pups, but placing a bat house during this time period can help begin the process of excluding bats from buildings because it offers an alternative habitat. More information on exclusion can be found in DNR's Bat Exclusion publication.

Builders are encouraged to paint the bat house dark brown or black to help the house heat up and stay warm through the night. A warmer house enables a shorter gestation period and faster maturation of the pups, Kaarakka says.


Kent Borcherding has now built more than 800 bat houses to aid bats in the Midwest, including more than 100 for Yellowstone Lake State Park.
Video Credit: DNR

Installing bat houses on sunny, south or east facing sites within one-quarter mile of lakes or rivers, where bats can drink water and find food at night, increases the chances the houses will be used. Bat houses should be mounted 10 to 15 feet in the air on a pole or a building and not trees, which provide too much shade and easy access to the bats from predators such as owls.

Finally, Kaarakka encourages patience in waiting for bats to take up residence in the new house. "If there is a colony within a mile or so, the bat house may get used within a couple of months, especially in the late summer and fall as juvenile bats are exploring and learning to forage," she says. "If there is no established roost in the area, it can sometimes take several years for bats to find and inhabit the bat house."

Learn about other ways to help Wisconsin bats and subscribe for free electronic updates online today - visit the Wisconsin Bat Program (exit DNR).

________________________

 

The ultimate birder adventure - head to Horicon Marsh May 12-15 for the 20th annual Bird Festival

HORICON, Wis. - Bird enthusiasts can experience the sights, sounds and natural beauty of birds in peak spring migration as the Horicon Marsh Bird Club hosts the 20th annual Bird Festival at Horicon Marsh Education and Visitor Center May 12-15.

This Black-throated Green Warbler was caught in a mist net during a previous Horicon Marsh Bird Festival bird banding demonstration.
This Black-throated Green Warbler was caught in a mist net during a previous Horicon Marsh Bird Festival bird banding demonstration.
Photo Credit: DNR

This Black-throated Green Warbler was caught in a mist net during a previous Horicon Marsh Bird Festival bird banding demonstration.

From the backyard birder to the world traveler, four days of adventure awaits by foot, boat, bus and bicycle at Horicon Marsh, one of the largest freshwater marshes in the United States. The Horicon Marsh Bird Festival is the oldest bird festival in Wisconsin.

Throughout the festival, the Horicon National Wildlife Refuge Visitor Center, Marsh Haven Nature Center and Horicon Marsh Education and Visitor Center will be buzzing with interactive displays, programs, and opportunities for viewing birds at their observation areas.

The festival will begin with a Habitat Birding Bus and Boat Tour. Popular favorites include the Hot Spot Birding Bus Tour & Hike, Beginners Bird Hike, Birding Adventure Boat Tour, and 20+ other tours and activities planned by the Horicon Marsh Bird Club.

Highlights of the 2017 festival include:

At over 33,000 acres, Horicon Marsh provides habitat for endangered species and is a critical rest stop for thousands of migrating songbirds and waterfowl. It is recognized as a Wetland of International Importance and as Global and State Important Bird Areas. More than 300 bird species are on the Horicon Marsh checklist.

The ultimate birder adventure - head to Horicon Marsh May 12-15 for the 19th annual Bird Festival - Wisconsin's oldest bird festival!
The ultimate birder adventure - head to Horicon Marsh May 12-15 for the 19th annual Bird Festival - Wisconsin's oldest bird festival!
Photo Credit: DNR

Many tours require advanced registration and fees and spaces are filling up fast. Partners for this event include the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Marsh Haven Nature Center, Horicon Marsh Boat Tours, Friends of Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, and Friends of Horicon Marsh Education and Visitor Center.

To plan your birding adventure, visit www.horiconmarshbirdclub.com [EXIT DNR] and click on the Bird Festival link for a complete list of events, descriptions and registration information. For additional registration information, contact Liz Herzmann, DNR wildlife conservation educator, at 920-387-7893.

Remember to check out the Explorium while visiting the marsh

Have you ever driven an airboat? Head to the Horicon Marsh Explorium and explore the virtual marsh!
Have you ever driven an airboat? Head to the Horicon Marsh Explorium and explore the virtual marsh!
Photo Credit: DNR

While at Horicon Marsh for the Bird Festival, be sure to check out the Explorium and learn more about the history of the marsh while enjoying a number of interactive exhibits.

Have you ever driven an airboat? Head to the Horicon Marsh Explorium and explore the virtual marsh!

The Horicon Marsh Education and Visitor Center is located between Horicon, Wis. and Mayville, Wis. on Hwy. 28. For a detailed list of all Horicon Marsh Education and Visitor Center special events, please visit the Friends of Horicon Marsh website at www.horiconmarsh.org (exit DNR). For more information regarding Horicon Marsh education programs, contact Liz Herzmann, DNR educator, at 920-387-7893.

________________________

 

Lake Michigan Fisheries Forum set to discuss Green Bay fisheries, organization's governance

GREEN BAY -- Highlights of the Green Bay fishery and other updates on Lake Michigan will be shared by leaders from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources at the April 8 meeting of the Lake Michigan Fisheries Forum.

The agenda includes presentations by DNR fisheries biologists Tammie Paoli and Steve Hogler as well as by Dan Isermann, an assistant professor of fisheries and water resources at UW-Stevens Point. A major focus of the meeting will be the forum's governance structure with discussion and approval of the terms of reference.

The public meeting runs from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the at the Weyers-Hilliard Branch of the Brown County Library, 2680 Riverview Drive, Green Bay, 54313.

The Lake Michigan Fisheries Forum offers opportunities for citizens and stakeholders to hear the latest research findings, management news and trends affecting the lake. The forum is facilitated by the University of Wisconsin Sea Grant Institute with support from DNR. Representatives from major sport fishing clubs on Lake Michigan and Green Bay, commercial fishers, the Conservation Congress and the University of Wisconsin System are formal members of the forum.

A copy of the proposed terms of reference as well as background information on Lake Michigan fisheries management can be found by visiting the DNR website, dnr.wi.gov and searching "Lake Michigan Fisheries Forum."

________________________

Read more: Previous Weekly News

Last Revised: Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Contact information

For more information about news and media, contact:
James Dick
Director of Communications
608-267-2773