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Outdoor Report for May 19, 2016Published by the Central Office

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View current conditions for Wisconsin State Parks, Trails and Forests
Check out the Wisconsin Department of Tourism (exit DNR).

Sun and warmer weather during the day has returned in full force this week, though some late evenings and early mornings are still well below 50 degrees. While this has increased fire danger to "high" in the northeast and northwest parts of the state, counties in the central and southern regions are at "moderate" and "low" levels respectively.

Trilliums are in bloom this week near the campground at Potawatomi State Park
Trilliums are in bloom this week near the campground at Potawatomi State Park
Photo Credit: DNR

The current warm spell has increased water temperatures into the upper 50s to low 60s on many northern lakes and this has spurred on a slug of bass and panfish spawning activity. Both largemouth and smallmouth bass are starting their spawning period and many dished out areas have been observed in the shallows. Crappie are also full into their nesting period and many dark-colored males have been observed in the shallows along weed lines and brushy cover. Larger bluegill have also been congregating near shallow water and spawning colonies may start showing up in the next week or so.

Despite strong winds, a late week cool down and highly variable success, fishing pressure steadily increased last weekend into this week. Walleye success has been very erratic, but there have been a few reports of good catches. Jig and minnow combinations continue to be bait of choice -- though leaches and crawlers are quickly becoming more popular. Warming water temperatures have mayfly nymphs starting to move, which will help draw the fish up shallow.

Voyager Park in De Pere continues to see high fishing pressure with anglers catching freshwater drum and white bass with the occasional walleye and smallmouth bass mixed in. Walleye anglers launching from Bayshore Park had modest catch rates. Fishing pressure on both the bay side and lake side of the Door County Peninsula was far below average this past weekend due to poor weather conditions and extremely rough waters. With the spring Sturgeon Bay Open on last weekend, fishing pressure for smallmouth bass on Little Sturgeon Bay was high all week. Smallmouth bass catch rates were high with fish ranging from 14 to 20 inches, and weighed 3.4 to just under 7 pounds.

Along Lake Michigan, anglers lined the Kewaunee shorelines this past weekend for the 2016 Kewaunee International Carp Championship. The largest fish caught weighed just shy of 30 pounds. Due to windy conditions early this past week there was little fishing pressure from boats. Later in the week boats reported catching brown trout, lake trout, and chinook salmon trolling along the shoreline.

Does intentionally leave fawns alone in the woods for protection.  If you find one, leave it where it is and slowly back away.
Does intentionally leave fawns alone in the woods for protection. If you find one, leave it where it is and slowly back away.
Photo Credit: Contributed

Reports of white-tail fawns are now increasing significantly and remember, if you encounter a fawn in the wild, keep your distance and don't assume that the mother has abandoned it. Does intentionally leave fawns by themselves for protection and return to care for the fawn as needed.

As air and water temperatures are again warming, American toads, leopard frogs, and gray tree frogs are calling wildly.

The recent rains before the sun have prairie and forest flowers blooming away and reports of trilliums, violets and shooting stars are streaming in from trails across the state. In addition to the wildflowers, oak trees are leafing out and flowering, which attracts large numbers of insects. Not coincidentally, a strong portion of the bird migration is ongoing and warblers, orioles and tanagers are eagerly preying on the recently arrived bugs.

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Upcoming State Natural Area Workday

The prairie is blooming, come restore Chiwaukee Prairie State Natural Area. Help Chiwaukee Prairie Preservation Fund volunteers during a monthly workday [PDF] on the third Saturday and enjoy the beauty of this rich prairie in the process. Invasives like buckthorn, garlic mustard, lion's tooth, dame's rocket, hawkweed and others can spread and shade out uncommon plants at this site. We will remove these using a variety of techniques including herbicides, shovels, and our hands. - Jared Urban, conservation biologist, Dane

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Northern Region

Superior DNR Service Center area

Brule River State Forest - Dynamic is a word that would adequately describe what is happening in nature right now. Leaves are out and the forest floor is laden with green. The Last turkey season will end next Tuesday. Fisheries staff say that panfish and bass should be moving up in to the shallow water for spawning and may be more aggressively feeding during this time. The great weather we are having is more than a fair excuse to get out for a canoe/ fishing trip on the Brule USGS flow rate data and dnr.wi.gov are a couple helpful links to use before heading to the Brule. Wildlife staff spotted the first fawn of the season. We will start to see more fawns and other baby critters as the weeks progress. Remember, if you encounter a baby animal in the wild, keep your distance and don't assume that the mother has abandoned her babies just because you find them alone. Follow this link to at dnr.wi.gov to learn more about how to keep wildlife wild! Bugs and ticks are out in full force. Keep that in mind as you plan a trip outside. Dress appropriately and make sure you frequently check yourself over for ticks after you get in from being outside. - Edwin Koepp, visitor services associate

Park Falls DNR Service Center area

Upper Chippewa Basin fisheries report (Price, Rusk, Sawyer Taylor and inland Ashland and Iron counties) - Cold, changing and ever-variable weather conditions late last week continued to keep fishermen guessing on most waters across the Northwoods - but the recent warm and stable weather pattern should provide for more consistent fishing action in the coming week. The current warm spell has increased water temperatures into the upper 50s to low 60s on many lakes and this has spurred on a slug of bass and panfish spawning activity. Both largemouth and smallmouth bass are starting their spawning period and many dished out areas have been observed in the shallows - with the males often sitting tight and guarding the nests against predators. Crappie are also full into their nesting period and many dark-colored males have been observed in the shallows along weed lines and brushy cover. Larger bluegill have also been congregating near shallow water and spawning colonies may start showing up in the next week or so. Walleye fishing success has been very erratic - but there have been a few reports of good catches being made. Jig and minnow combinations continue to be bait of choice -- though leaches and crawlers are quickly becoming more popular. With the cold temperatures last weekend, most of the walleye were found in 12 to 18 feet of water and few were venturing up shallow. But look for that to change with warming water temps and the fact that the mayfly nymphs have started to move, which will help draw the fish up shallow. This also signals the time to rely more on leaches and crawlers, and this bite will only get better as the spring season progresses. Northern pike action has been good with the fish being very active with the warming water temperatures. Just look for newly emerging weed beds and roll a spinner bait over the tops the freshly growing weeds. - Skip Sommerfeldt, senior fisheries biologist, Park Falls

Flambeau River State Forest - The weather had been cold and wet but folks were still trying to catch some fish. This week there is a warming trend with sunny days which is just perfect for enjoying the lakes and river of the Flambeau River State Forest. The temperatures have been perfect for the seasonal raking and preparing the garden for planting. The trees and bushes are nearly all leafed out with the last precipitation. Spring flowers are abundant. Service berries, trilliums, spring beauties, bloodroot, and trout lilies are just to name a few that are blooming. The robins and swallows are nesting, Baltimore orioles, and red breasted grosbeaks have been spotted. Bears and cubs are out and about looking for food. It is close to the time that deer will be having fawns and a few have already been born. The elk are looking for a place to calve. This is the best time of year with all those youngsters being born! It is the season for bugs, so be prepared with appropriate bug proof clothing or spray. The ATV/UTV trail opened last weekend. There are four ATV/UTV trailheads that can accommodate vehicles and that offer other amenities: Dix Dox, Flambeau Hills, Fisherman's Landing and Tower Hill. Watch for wildlife while out on the trails and drive responsibly. Hiking trails are open throughout the forest. Lake of the Pines, Little Falls/Slough Gundy Scenic Area, Bass Lake Wilderness Area and the Ski Trail at the Flambeau Hills offer an abundance of scenic back country. If you choose to go to Little Falls/Slough Gundy Area be sure to read the signs carefully and if you are able to traverse boulders and cross the rocky river bed, try crossing to Slough Gundy. You will see some large white pines, cedars and hemlocks and the unusual rock formation called the elephant rock. It is a large boulder with a white pine that straddles over a boulder and it looks like a very large elephant with trunk. The cliffs on the north end of the island of Sough Gundy are a great place to sit and watch the river flow and listen to the wild world around you. The lakes and river were busier than usual. Check your 2016-17 Fishing Regulations for opening dates, daily limits and lengths. There also has been canoes and kayaks paddling the river. The water levels are perfect for an enjoyable ride down the river. - Diane Stowell, visitor services associate

Woodruff DNR Service Center area

Northern Highland-American Legion State Forest - It is a beautiful time in the forest. The trees are ablaze in the lovely pastel greens and pinks of their tiny leaves. The service berry is blooming profusely and the pin cherry is not far behind. Wood anemones and regular and barren strawberries join the many tiny sand and sweet white violets adorning the forest floor. A few trilliums are blooming if you know where to look for them. Blood roots and hepaticas are just about done blooming. Robins, hermit thrushes and winter wrens are serenating everyone just before dark. Warblers will be more abundant as the weekend arrives and will be harder to spot as the leaves get a little bigger. Male Ruby throated hummingbirds survived the snowy weekend and are visiting the feeders. We have some hungry black flies to remind one that the mosquitos are not far behind. - Rosalie Richter, visitor services associate

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Northeast Region

Northern Lake Michigan fisheries team report

Marinette County - A few smallmouth bass were being caught by the dam at Peshtigo on crank baits or floating crawlers in the current seams. Carp, sheep head, and a few catfish were being caught on the lower Peshtigo River on live baits fished on bottom. A few browns and walleye are being caught out of little river trolling sticks and crawler/harness. Musky anglers were the majority of anglers on the Menominee River for the opener on Sunday. - Kevin King, fisheries technician, Peshtigo

Oconto County - Anglers at the dam at Stiles are catching bluegill and a few crappie using worms, minnows, and wax worms. Most of the action has been close to the dam or by the pilings. The walleye bite from Oconto Park II to Pensaukee Landing has been spotty at times and anglers report catching a few fish shallow using stick baits or crawler/harness. The best walleye success has been south of Oconto Park II down to Pensaukee with fish now showing up in 17 to 19 feet of water. Early morning and late afternoon have been the best times to fish. Pike are being caught from the breakwater using large shiner minnows fished with a three-way swivel. Some very large walleye are being caught off the end of the Breakwater casting stick baits after dark with the best bites coming around midnight. - Kevin King, fisheries technician, Peshtigo

Brown County - Voyager Park in De Pere continues to see high fishing pressure with more of the anglers throwing live bait or soft plastics trying to catch "anything that will bite." The anglers are catching freshwater drum and white bass with the occasional walleye and smallmouth bass mixed in. Anglers that have been trying there luck out in the bay have seen little to no success trolling and jigging for walleyes. They have been reporting high numbers of freshwater drum but can't seem to get any of the targeted species. Duck Creek fishing pressure continues to remain low with only one interview attained. From the interview it was reported that the common carp and northern pike have been biting fairly well. Baits being thrown were twister tails and crankbaits. The Suamico River boat launch saw heavy boating traffic this past week. Walleye anglers launching from Bayshore Park had modest catch rates. Several fish are being marked, but getting them to bite has been a bit tricky. Early mornings and late evenings produced the most fish. Crank baits are being trolled at higher rates than crawler harnesses. Walleye measured this week ranged from 16-24 inches and averaged 19.8 inches. Fishing pressure was high on the weekend and moderate during the week days. Incidental catches included freshwater drum, channel catfish, northern pike, white perch and brown trout. Pier anglers at Bayshore Park where primarily casting night crawlers under a bobber or off the bottom with gobies being the predominate catch. - Adrian Meseberg, fisheries technician, Green Bay

Door County - Fishing pressure was far below average this past weekend due to poor weather conditions and extremely rough waters on both the bay side and lake side of the Door County Peninsula. Very few anglers ventured out with little to no success and those fishing from the shores reported nothing biting at all. The rivers in Door County (Heins, Hibbards, Shivering Sands, Whitefish Bay Creek) continue to have good flow and water clarity, but the water levels are down from earlier in the year. A few steelhead were seen in the deeper pools at Heins Creek but they were all small in size according to the only angler spoken with. Fishing pressure in Rowleys Bay has been very high from both wading and boat anglers. Anglers wading the shallow weedy shorelines are having success catching smallmouth bass and a few small northern pike. The peak white sucker run on the Sugar Creek is done. Boats have been concentrating their efforts in the Mink River and out into the bay near the warmer water from the river. Anglers launching at the Stone Quarry had success later in the week catching walleyes and whitefish while trolling and vertical jigging. Boats returning to the Sunset Park ramp reported catching a few smallmouth bass that were from 4-5 pounds. Anglers fishing from boats and from shore around Sturgeon Bay have reported catching Walleyes mainly after dark. Walleye catch rates were hit or miss for boaters launching from Chaudoir's Dock. A few boaters were fishing for smallmouth bass. Using primarily plastics, their catch rates were low. A few brown trout were caught by Chaudoir's Dock boaters trolling north of the launch. Water clarity was several feet down. Fishing pressure was relatively light. With the spring Sturgeon Bay Open on the weekend of May 13-15, fishing pressure for smallmouth bass on Little Sturgeon Bay was high all week. Boaters filled the lower parking lot every day and those who arrived late were left to park in the over flow lot across the street. Smallmouth bass catch rates were high. Plastics were the most common lures. The walleye bite has been best in the evenings and into the night. Large walleye, including 30+ inchers, were being caught by trolling boaters. Side catches included freshwater drum, northern pike, musky and brown trout. Water clarity was more than 6 feet. Northern pike catch rates were fairly high on Sawyer Harbor this week. Pike harvested and measured were in the low to mid 20 inch range. Spinner baits and minnows both landed fish. Smallmouth bass catch rates were good this week as well. Anglers using plastics and suckers caught fish. Smallmouth harvested and measured this week ranged from 14-20 inches, and weighed 3.4 to just under 7 pounds. Fishing pressure was light throughout the week. Water clarity was high. - Lucas Koenig, fisheries technician, Sturgeon Bay

Kewaunee County - Fishing pressure on the piers has been low, but anglers lined the shorelines in town this past weekend for the 2016 Kewaunee International Carp Championship. The largest fish caught weighed just shy of 30 pounds. Due to windy conditions early this past week there was little fishing pressure from boats. Later in the week boats reported catching brown trout, lake trout, and chinook salmon trolling along the shoreline. Fishing pressure in Algoma this past week was very low. Boats launching from Algoma have been marking fish in 5-12 feet of water while trolling for brown trout. - Lucas Koenig, fisheries technician, Sturgeon Bay

Manitowoc County - Fishing in Manitowoc County has been very slow as a whole. The wind and temps are still making fishing difficult, keeping most fishermen at home. Boats have been fishing near shore and around the harbors but have not found any browns. Pier anglers have not done any better. Even catfish action in Manitowoc has slowed with the cool weather. Most fishermen are holding out for better weather. - Ben Thome, fisheries technician, Mishicot

Sturgeon Bay DNR Service Center area

Potawatomi State Park - Trees are leafing out. All hiking and biking trails are open. Visitors are finding morels. Trilliums are in bloom. The launch piers are in the water and the fish cleaning station is open. The park's accessible fishing pier was severely damaged by high waves in 2014 and removed from the water. The Friends of Potawatomi State Park plan to start a fundraising campaign in 2016 to support replacement of the accessible fishing pier in the picnic area. Please visit www.runwild.org for more information. - Lois M. Hanson, visitor services associate

Dwarf lake iris
Dwarf lake iris
Photo Credit: DNR

Whitefish Dunes State Park - Lots of bird activity at the bird feeder such as the downy, hairy, red-bellied woodpeckers, nuthatches, cardinals and chickadees. New at the feeder this week are Baltimore Orioles and indigo buntings. Red-breasted mergansers were also spotted out in the lake. Hepatica, bloodroot, dwarf lake iris, and trillium are in bloom. Due to above average water levels, there is limited beach compared to prior years. On high wave days, visitors can expect there to be very limited or no sand areas. The best way to access the beach is to hike the red trail behind the nature center and use the staircase to get down to the beach. Sturgeon Bay detour: The Bayview Bridge in Sturgeon Bay on Highway 42/57 is closed. The Department of Transportation expects the bridge to reopen by the Fourth of July weekend. For more information, see the detour map [exit DNR]. The recent sunny and warmer spring days have dried out most of the trails. The boardwalk on the Brachiopod Trail is closed until further notice due to safety concerns. - Jaclyn Moeri, visitor services associate

Wautoma DNR Service Center area

Waupaca County - Turkeys have been pretty quiet but are still strutting quite a bit. Ruffed grouse are still drumming. Trout streams running a bit a low, could use some rain to raise water levels. Trout biting well on crawlers and panther martin spinners. Not much pressure on area lakes in the last week due to a serious cold front that came through late last week. Rose breasted grosbeak and northern oriole were seen this week. Morel mushrooms are out in northern Waupaca County. The forecast is for temperatures in the 70s and sunny for the next week. - Karl Kramer, wildlife technician, Wautoma

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Southeast Region

Milwaukee DNR Service Center area

Kettle Moraine State Forest, Southern Unit - The spring bird migration is now in full swing in the southern unit, as evidenced by a field trip on June 15 from the Wisconsin Society of Ornithology (http://wsobirds.org/). Coordinated by Carl Schwartz, and ably led by Andrea Szymczak with assistance by Bill Volkert, the group saw a total of 92 bird species on the trip. Among the highlights were 21 species of warblers, notably prairie warbler, and the state-threatened hooded and cerulean warblers. Highlights among the 11 species of sparrows seen were the lark, grasshopper, and state-threatened Henslow's sparrows. In the woods, despite the shrub layer having fully leafed and the oaks flowering and leafing out, wild geranium and may apple are blooming. Incidentally, enormous quantities of insects are attracted to the oak flowers. It's not by chance that the bird migration coincides with blooming of oaks. Migrant birds seen in the woodlands for the first time this year, among others, include blue-winged, golden-winged, and chestnut sided warblers, scarlet tanager, orchard oriole, and white-crowned sparrow. Over the past month, staff has conducted prescribed burns on many of the prairies and oak openings in the southern unit. Fire is essential to the reducing competition from trees, shrubs, and invasive species with native wildflowers and grasses. Prairie plants now blooming include the state-threatened kitten tail, prairie violet, hoary puccoon and wood betony. In the wetlands, species making their first appearances for the year were Blanding's turtle, green frog, hooded merganser, and green heron. Join one of our naturalists in May on Saturdays at 10 a.m. for wildflower walks, and on Sundays at 8 a.m. for bird walks. (Meet at Forest Headquarters, off Rt. 59 between Eagle and Palmyra.) - Todd Miller, assistant naturalist guide

Southern Lake Michigan fisheries team report - Compiled from creel clerks by Cheryl Masterson and Jeffrey Zinuticz, fisheries technicians, Milwaukee

Sheboygan County - The Pigeon River was 50 degrees on Saturday; it is higher than last week. Many alewives remain around south pier in Sheboygan. Fishing pressure was relatively low this weekend with cold weather and occasional snow fall on Saturday. Earlier in the week there were a few brown trout and a coho caught from south pier, most success was seen further out on the pier. Anglers used alewives, minnows, and spoons.

Ozaukee County - Sauk Creek is high and very rapid after rains this week, it measured at 46 degrees on Saturday. There were many alewives around the lakeshore this week, some anglers targeting them to use as bait fish were successful near the power plant. Some brown trout and a few rainbow trout were caught from the south pier or nearby shoreline this weekend with alewives and spawn sacs. There was very high boating pressure on Sunday; boat anglers had high success catching coho. An occasional chinook and lake trout were also caught. Spoons and a wide variety of flies were the boaters baits of choice. The Army Corps of Engineers has started repairs on the breakwall of the north pier in Port Washington, and access to the pier is prohibited. Construction is projected to last until July 3.

Milwaukee County - The catch rate on the shoreline increased during the week. Large schools of baitfish continue to move into the area with chinook and coho salmon following close behind. Anglers are starting to see schools of alewives on the lake side of McKinley Pier. Nice catches of coho and a couple of chinook were landed on the pier during the week. Anglers fishing with alewives had better luck landing trout and salmon. The surface water temperature on the lake side of McKinley Pier decreased from 49 degrees last week to 46 on Sunday. Anglers landed a few brown trout, coho, and chinook while casting spoons and crank baits and soaking alewives in the harbor behind Summerfest. The surface water temperature in the lagoons was 58 degrees. Nice size kings (up to 17 pounds), brown trout, and coho were caught in the harbor and between the south gap and the Milwaukee River on crank baits and small spoons. Boats were marking large amounts of bait near the mouth of the Milwaukee River and in front of Jones Island. Boats that trolled outside the break wall on Sunday landed more fish than the boats in the harbor. Some of the charters reported good luck trolling in 200-250 feet of water at the start of the week but ended up in 100-120 feet of water by the end of the week. Fishing pressure on the shoreline was low at the start of the week due to strong winds off the lake, 4-6 foot waves, fog, and rain. The water along the shoreline was cloudy/turbid over half a mile offshore. Small craft advisories were in effect on Monday and Tuesday. The wind chill dropped to 29 degrees on the weekend with snow flurries on Saturday. The anglers targeted brown trout, smallmouth bass, and panfish but caught only gobies and a couple of carp. Anglers on the Grant Park shoreline have been targeting brown trout and coho with spawn sacks, crank baits, and spoons but the catch rate has been low due to the cloudy turbid water along the shoreline. The majority of the fishing pressure on the Oak Creek was at the pool below the dam. Most of the fish caught in the pool recently have been carp. The water temperature in the creek decreased from 62 degrees last week to 56 on Sunday. Nice catches of trout and salmon were landed on the Oak Creek Power plant fishing pier. Most of the fish were caught by anglers drifting crank baits in the current on the lake side of the pier. A few nice size carp (up to 15 pounds) were landed in the discharge chute by anglers fishing with bread dough. Boats out of Bender Park have been targeting coho salmon with crank baits, spoons, and peanut flies from Wind Point to the South Shore water treatment plant. The anglers had good luck landing coho in 200-250 feet of water earlier in the week. Menomonee River water level and flow rate increased with over 1.5 inches of rain falling at the start of the week. The water temperature at Miller Park was the same as last week at 56 degrees. The water temperature at MMSD was 62 degrees. Most of the fishing pressure continues to be downstream from Miller and Three Bridges Park. The fishing pressure increased at the MMSD fishing site. The catch rate for crappies has tapered off with only 1-2 occasionally being landed. Weed beds near the river bank held most of the panfish. The river restoration project above Miller Park is almost finished. The brush, buckthorn, and large vines along the shoreline at 45th and State Street fishing area will be removed this summer (in July and August). All of the trees will be removed except for the smaller willows.

Racine County - A few boats were out this weekend, most of which concentrated their efforts around the water treatment plant to the south. Most of these boats were getting a few coho. The boats were using the standard coho flasher/fly rigs and some also trolling flicker shads. Water temperature was 47 degrees. A few anglers have been fishing the piers this weekend, with most success coming off the south pier. Coho were being caught using alewives on the bottom or under bobber, casting little cleo spoons, or casting crankbaits. Water temperature was 47 degrees. Fishing pressure on the Root River is way down, with most anglers targeting smallmouth bass or suckers. One angler reported seeing a few steelhead in the river, but the water clarity then went way down with last week's rain. Bait of choice was primarily worms with a split shot and hook.

Kenosha County - A few boats were trolling close, but the more consistent bite for the boats this past week has been out in 210 to 260 feet of water (12 miles out) for coho. These boats were fishing 50 to 70 feet down using any sort of flasher/fly combo, with no particular colors standing out. Water temperature was 47 degrees. The best baits were alewives on bottom rigs, jigs and white fluke minnows, or casting spoons. Water temperature was 47 degrees. A few anglers were fishing various spots around the harbor this week. No fish were examined, but one angler had said that a few browns had been caught earlier in the week. Baits of choice were spoons and crank baits. Water temperature was 50 degrees inside the harbor. No anglers were interviewed fishing the Pike River this weekend despite the warm weather. The river was fairly turbid from the rain this week. Water temperature was up to 58 degrees.

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South Central Region

Fitchburg DNR Service Center area

Dane County - White-tailed deer fawns are starting to appear with multiple reports since last weekend. Bird migration is in full swing. Trees are starting to fully leaf out now but still good migration days to come. Last week brought multiple days of 20-plus warbler species mornings. Flycatchers, cuckoos, dickcissel, and other late migrants are expected now as we progress through the month of May. Early nesting birds are now feeding young including sandhill cranes, meadowlarks, chickadee, woodpeckers, woodcock amongst others. Waterfowl broods are now conspicuous on area marshes and ponds. Prairie species currently in flower include golden alexander, puccoon, violets, blue-eyed grass, and shooting stars. - Andy Paulios, wildlife biologist, Fitchburg

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West Central Region

La Crosse DNR Service Center area

Vernon County - As air and water temperatures are again warming, American toads, leopard frogs, and gray tree frogs are calling wildly. Green frogs and bull frogs should begin calling toward the end of May as water temperatures approach 65-70 degrees. Turkey hunters participating in the fifth hunting period battled cold, rainy, windy weather and reported minimal successes. Gobblers remain active and pretty receptive to calling, as most hens are now incubating. - Dave Matheys, wildlife biologist, Viroqua

Wisconsin Rapids DNR Service Center area

Buckhorn State Park - Sandhill cranes, osprey and spring peepers have been seen and heard around the park as well as grouse, bald eagles, bats, and dragonflies. Hunting in the state park and Buckhorn Wildlife Area are now closed for the season. - Heather Wolf, park manager

Roche-A-Cri State Park - Join the Friends of Roche-A-Cri for Breakfast with the Birds this Saturday, May 21 from 9-11 a.m. at the stairway shelter. Breakfast provided by the friends group, bird ID program and hike will be led by a volunteer naturalist. - Heather Wolf, park manager



Last Revised: Thursday, May 19, 2016

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